Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

How To ACE This Class Paul G. Young, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor - Ohio University-Lancaster Past President of the National Association of Elementary School.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "How To ACE This Class Paul G. Young, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor - Ohio University-Lancaster Past President of the National Association of Elementary School."— Presentation transcript:

1 How To ACE This Class Paul G. Young, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor - Ohio University-Lancaster Past President of the National Association of Elementary School Principals and the National AfterSchool Association

2 Your education is priceless and you must decide to make the most of every learning opportunity You must commit to LEARN To learn, you must WORK

3

4

5 Typical Distribution of Students Within a College Class One sixth MediocresC Two thirds Backbones B- B B+ A- One sixth SuperstarsA In which group do you want your professors to see you? Quiet sitters and getters who do what is expected Absent whiners and complainers Growth mindset

6

7 Work ethic can be defined as what you are willing to do when no one is watching

8 You Need to Demonstrate Ten Work Ethic Virtues in Every Class 1.Attitude 2.Common Sense 3.Competence 4.Gratitude 5.Initiative 6.Integrity 7.Perseverance 8.Professionalism 9.Reliability 10.Respect Adapted from Eric Chester (2012), Reviving Work Ethic: A Leader's Guide to Ending Entitlement and Restoring Pride in the Emerging Workforce. Austin, TX: Greenleaf Book Group Press

9 Attitude The foundational virtue The foundational virtue Displayed through a smile, body language, manners, courtesy, habits, optimism, and enthusiasm Displayed through a smile, body language, manners, courtesy, habits, optimism, and enthusiasm Future employers look for desirable attitude traits (people skills) during interviews Future employers look for desirable attitude traits (people skills) during interviews Focus on the positive, remove negativity Focus on the positive, remove negativity Negative attitudes create an infectious work culture Negative attitudes create an infectious work culture

10 1.Posture 2.Eye contact 3.Body language 4.Preparation/Organization 5.Positive facial expressions (smile) 6.Occasional nodding of head; display of interest 7.Constant attention (no multitasking) 8.Consideration of others 9.Note-taking 10.Pleasant speaking voice (tone of voice) and proper grammar

11 Make A Good First Impression People typically shape their opinions in seconds People typically shape their opinions in seconds Characteristics that shape opinions include: Characteristics that shape opinions include: Personality (smile) Personality (smile) Level of sophistication (confidence) Level of sophistication (confidence) Trustworthiness (punctuality; reliability) Trustworthiness (punctuality; reliability) Dress (professionalism) Dress (professionalism) Posture (body language) Posture (body language) Sense of humor (small talk) Sense of humor (small talk) Show pride in who you are both personally and professionally Show pride in who you are both personally and professionally It’s hard to shake a bad first impression It’s hard to shake a bad first impression Make a good first impression in EVERY class

12 What Is Your Personal Brand?

13 Who makes the best impression?

14

15 Come to Class with a Growth Mindset From the work of Carol S. Dweck Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, 2006

16

17 Common Sense Life is a series of ordinary events that follow the laws of logic and probability Ordinary events require careful, accurate navigation with common sense Avoid getting lost in your fantasies Avoid getting lost in your fantasies Pay attention to the obvious Pay attention to the obvious KNOWLEDGE + COMMON SENSE = WISDOM KNOWLEDGE - COMMON SENSE = NONSENSE

18 Do you think you have common sense? What do others think? This week, ask someone that you trust for feedback.

19 Competence Ability to READ Ability to READ Ability to WRITE Ability to WRITE Ability to SPEAK in public settings Ability to SPEAK in public settings Mastery of a major discipline (content) Mastery of a major discipline (content) Pursuit of personal continuous improvement Pursuit of personal continuous improvement Employers will assess your initial competence by reviewing your college transcript

20 Gratitude Gratitude and appreciation are similar Gratitude and appreciation are similar Treat others fairly and in a friendly manner Treat others fairly and in a friendly manner Accept and value others Accept and value others Let people know they matter Let people know they matter Become part of the solution to problems rather than part of the problem Become part of the solution to problems rather than part of the problem Live by the principle of The Golden Rule Live by the principle of The Golden Rule

21 Showing Gratitude… Promotes understanding and draws others to you Creates unity and harmony with those you acknowledge Builds trust and sensibility Generates happiness and a sense of safety When expressing gratitude, be genuine No one respects a suck-up

22 Initiative Add value to the class Add value to the class Display passion Display passion Do more than is expected Do more than is expected The syllabus outlines minimal standards The syllabus outlines minimal standards Be better than mediocrity and status quo; change is inevitable Be better than mediocrity and status quo; change is inevitable Those with initiative take risks and are not afraid to make mistakes Those with initiative take risks and are not afraid to make mistakes You can’t wait until job interview time to begin showing initiative

23 Simple Initiative Strategies Raise your hand and ask at least one question in every class (Let the professor know you are present) Strive to take such an active role in your classes that if you have to be absent, everyone misses you - especially the professor 5 pages required in a paper? Write six Help out in anyway you can with others

24 Integrity Bring both personal honesty and cultural integrity to every class Bring both personal honesty and cultural integrity to every class Tell the truth and don’t point fingers Tell the truth and don’t point fingers Avoid white lies Avoid white lies Celebrate honesty and integrity Celebrate honesty and integrity Avoid students who are dishonest and irresponsible Avoid students who are dishonest and irresponsible Set the tone for your fellow classmates Set the tone for your fellow classmates

25 Perseverance (Grit) Finish what you start Finish what you start Finish work that might seem hard and/or boring Deliberate practice makes perfect with the “Rule of 10,000 Hours” Eliminate distractions Eliminate distractions Multitasking is a myth Multitasking is a myth When you get knocked down (and you will!), get back up When you get knocked down (and you will!), get back up

26

27 Professionalism Professionalism at work is a business virtue Professionalism at work is a business virtue Use proper grammar, pronunciation, writing skills, and manners Use proper grammar, pronunciation, writing skills, and manners Clarity is crucial Clarity is crucial Become aware of what to say and when and where to say it Become aware of what to say and when and where to say it Dress first class, think first class, act first class

28 Social Signaling You send a message everyday by how you choose to dress, groom, attend in class, interact with classmates, and display personal body language First impressions are powerful What message and lasting impression do you intend others to have of you?

29 Ohio State Linebacker Gets Serious in Effort to Impress Joshua Perry cares about how he looks. Although his Ohio State teammates might straggle to 5 a.m. workouts wearing sweatpants, the sophomore linebacker from Olentangy High School doesn’t want to look scruffy. he said. “I don’t think it takes that much to throw a shirt with a collar on, some khakis and some dress shoes,” he said. Perry believes that if he looks good, he will feel good, even at dawn. The Columbus Dispatch, November 14, 2013

30 “Like, eliminate ‘Ums’ and ‘Ahs’, Right?”

31 Reliability Reliability must be part of your Reliability must be part of your personal brand personal brand Reliability is consistency of measure Reliability is consistency of measure Reliability is trustworthiness Reliability is trustworthiness Reliability is either present or absent - there is no in between Reliability is either present or absent - there is no in between There is no place for the prevalent “Yeah, but” societal mentality in this class or a professional workplace There is no place for the prevalent “Yeah, but” societal mentality in this class or a professional workplace

32 What should reliability mean to you? Be in the classroom and in your seat at least 5 minutes before class begins Never miss! Get assignments turned in on time Take good notes Study Utilize Blackboard Accept responsibility No excuses

33 What do these pictures say about reliability?

34 Respect Respect = obedience, acceptance, conformity Respect = obedience, acceptance, conformity Obey and play by the rules Obey and play by the rules Respect the professor Respect the professor Respect fellow students Respect fellow students Respect the line between class work and social time Respect the line between class work and social time Strive for authenticity, accomplishment, competence, and tolerance of differences Strive for authenticity, accomplishment, competence, and tolerance of differences Self-discipline is a principle of greatness Self-discipline is a principle of greatness

35 Text your friends after class Don’t force me to take your phone

36

37 Do what you say you will do when you say you will do it

38

39 We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act, but a habit - Aristotle

40 The most promising students and most effective employees are those who develop a growth mindset Employers hire candidates with the best work ethic over talent and skills A key work ethic virtue: “Do what you say you will do when you say you will do it” Initiative isn’t something that you can wait to develop once you get a job When you get knocked down, show your GRIT. Pull yourself and your attitude back up Generational barriers will exist in the workforce for decades. Adapt and show flexibility and cooperation Develop a vision of what you want your future to become

41 Professional Reading Chua, Amy & Rubenfeld, Jed Chua, Amy & Rubenfeld, Jed (2014). The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America. New York: Penguin Press. Colvin, Geoff Colvin, Geoff (2008). Talent is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else. New York: Penguin Group. Davis, Vicki Davis, Vicki (2014). True Grit: The Best Measure of Success and How to Teach It. Edutopia, January 9, 2014.True Grit: The Best Measure of Success and How to Teach It Duckworth, Angela Duckworth, Angela. Google 8- Item Grit Scale. Dweck, Carol Dweck, Carol (2007). Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House. Elmore, Tim Elmore, Tim (2012). Artificial Maturity: Helping Kids Meet The Challenge of Becoming Authentic Adults. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass. Elmore, Tim Elmore, Tim (2010). Generation iY: Our Last Chance to Save Their Future. Atlanta: Poet Gardener Publishing. Elmore, Tim Elmore, Tim (2014). 12 Huge Mistakes Parents Can Avoid: Leading Your Kids to Succeed in Life. Eugene, OR: Harvest House Press. Gladwell, Malcolm Gladwell, Malcolm (2008). Outliers: The Story of Success. New York: Little, Brown & Company. Gladwell, Malcolm Gladwell, Malcolm (2013). David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants. New York: Little, Brown & Company. Gorksi, Paul Gorksi, Paul (2013). Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity Gap. New York: Teachers College Press.

42 Professional Reading Hoerr, Thomas R Hoerr, Thomas R. (2013). Fostering Grit: How Do I Prepare My Students For The Real World? Virginia: ASCD. Jensen, Eric Jensen, Eric (2013). Engaging Students with Poverty in Mind: Practical Strategies for Raising Achievement. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Kohn, Alfie Kohn, Alfie (2014). The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting. Boston: Da Capo Press. Pappano, Laura Pappano, Laura (2013). “Grit” and The New Character Education. Harvard Education Newsletter Vol. 29, Number 1—Jan./Feb. Payne, Ruby Payne, Ruby (1996, 2005) A Framework for Understanding Poverty. 4th Edition. Highlands, TX: aha! Process, Inc. Ricci, Mary Cay Ricci, Mary Cay (2013). Mindsets in The Classroom: Building a Culture of Success and Student Achievement in Schools. Waco, TX: Purfrock Press, Inc. Roberts, Yvonne Roberts, Yvonne (2009). Grit. The Skills for Success and How They Are Grown. London: Young FoundationGrit. The Skills for Success and How They Are Grown Tough, Paul Tough, Paul (2012). How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Tulgan, Bruce Tulgan, Bruce (2009). Not Everyone Gets a Trophy: How to Manage Generation Y. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Wormeli, Rick Wormeli, Rick. Perseverance and Grit. AMLE Magazine, Jan. 2014, Vol. 1, #5


Download ppt "How To ACE This Class Paul G. Young, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor - Ohio University-Lancaster Past President of the National Association of Elementary School."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google