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Dr. Hilary Fletcher United States Military Academy West Point, NY Department of Mathematical Sciences Developing Our Students’ Habits of Mind.

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Presentation on theme: "Dr. Hilary Fletcher United States Military Academy West Point, NY Department of Mathematical Sciences Developing Our Students’ Habits of Mind."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. Hilary Fletcher United States Military Academy West Point, NY Department of Mathematical Sciences Developing Our Students’ Habits of Mind

2 How Do You Define (+) HOM? “…dispositions that are skillfully and mindfully employed by characteristically intelligent, successful people when they are confronted with problems, the solutions to which are not immediately apparent.” The Institute of Habits of Mind 2

3 What are some HOM? Why are HOM so important? How can we incorporate HOM into our programs/courses/classrooms? How do we assess HOM? Agenda 3

4 The Habits of Mind as Identified by Costa and Kallick are: What are some +HOM? Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision Managing Impulsivity Gathering Data Through all Senses Persisting Creating, Imaging and Innovation Thinking Flexibly Taking Responsible Risks Questioning and Posing Problems Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision Managing Impulsivity Gathering Data Through all Senses Persisting Creating, Imaging and Innovation Thinking Flexibly Taking Responsible Risks Questioning and Posing Problems Striving for Accuracy Thinking Interdependently Applying Past Knowledge to New Situations Thinking about Thinking (Metacognition) Finding Humor Responding with Wonderment and Awe Listening with Understanding and Empathy Remaining Open to Continuous Learning Striving for Accuracy Thinking Interdependently Applying Past Knowledge to New Situations Thinking about Thinking (Metacognition) Finding Humor Responding with Wonderment and Awe Listening with Understanding and Empathy Remaining Open to Continuous Learning Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick, Habits of Mind: A Series, Copyright ©

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6 HOM at USMA Curiosity Reasoning/Critical Thinking Creativity Work Ethic Thinking Interdependently Life Long Learning

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8 WPLDS 3. Demonstrate a broad perspective that is open to new ideas and experiences. Remain curious and dedicated to a lifetime of learning. View situations from perspectives that combine the knowledge gained from a robust liberal-arts education with personal experiences. Interpret experiences using multiple viewpoints while appreciating the diversity and nuance of human behavior. Seek to increase personal and professional knowledge and remain open to experiences that push them beyond their comfort zone. 4. Understand ambiguous situations and solve complex problems. Think critically and pursue innovative and creative solutions. Identify the essential aspects of a situation. Employ available resources and seek additional information when needed. Draw upon mathematics, basic science, engineering, social sciences, humanities, and technology to anticipate change, understand ambiguous situations, and solve complex problems. Make meaningful connections between disparate experiences. Monitor, assess, and refine solutions to optimize outcomes. Learn from success and failure alike.

9 Calendar Outcomes What does this mean for us as educators?

10 With a partner, choose one HOM you strive to develop in your students. Define the HOM for your classroom. Develop some student outcomes and supporting student activities to accomplish these outcomes. Outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do. Share as a large group. 10 How Might We Incorporate HOM Into Our Classrooms?

11 An Example - Thinking Interdependently Too much lecture Lack of classroom interaction Over-reliance on group members Divide-and-conquer approach Barriers to Thinking Interdependently Definition: working with and learning from peers

12 HOM: Thinking Interdependently STUDENT OUTCOME: Act responsibly in fulfilling group commitments Student Activity #1 Student team of two solve problems during class. Each team presents their solution to the class. Student Activity #2 Student teams of three select a project and submit one written project report. How Might We Incorporate HOM Development Into Our Classrooms?

13 HOM: STUDENT OUTCOME 1: Student Activity STUDENT OUTCOME 2: Student Activity How Might We Incorporate HOM Development Into Our Classrooms?

14 With a partner, choose one HOM you strive to develop in your students. Define the HOM for your classroom. Develop some student outcomes and supporting student activities to accomplish these outcomes. Outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do. Share as a large group. 14 How Might We Incorporate HOM Into Our Classrooms?

15 Assessing HOM HOM: Thinking Interdependently STUDENT OUTCOME : Act responsibly in fulfilling group commitments. Student Activity #1 Student team of two solve problems during class. Each team presents their solution to the class. Assessment of Outcome for Student Activity #1 Indicator: Ask questions of both students, even if both students do not present the solution. Target: Each student is able to answer questions about the problem. Student Activity #2 Student teams of three select a project and submit one written project report. Assessment of Outcome for Student Activity #2 Indicator: Give an individual quiz on the project’s content. Also ask each student to provide feedback on the other group members. Target: All students earn > 65% while 80% earns a 75% or better. Positive feedback on all team members.

16 Assessment of Outcome(s) for Student Activity Indicator: Target: Assessment of Outcome(s) for Student Activity Indicator: Target: Assessment Worksheet

17 Why Are HOM So Important? PS & HOM Critical Thinking Thinking Interdependently Gathering Data Through All Senses Managing Impulsivity Creativity Curiosity Applying Past Knowledge Life long Learning Work Ethic

18 “Think about the significance of not just preparing our students for a life of tests…”

19 “…but rather for the tests of life.”

20 References The Best Of The Teaching Professor, Magna Publications, Inc Glatthorn, A. & Baron, J. (1985). The Good Thinker. In A. L. Costa (Ed.), Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Feuerstein, R, Rand, Y, Hoffman, M and Miller, R. (1980) Instrumental Enrichment: an Intervention Program for Cognitive Modifiability. Baltimore, MD. University Park Press. DeBono, E. (1991) The Cort Thinking Program in A. Costa (Ed) Developing Minds: Programs for Teaching Thinking. Alexandria, VA pp : Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Ennis, R. (2001) An Outline of Goals for A Critical Thinking Curriculum and Its Assessment in Costa, A. (Ed.) Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Whimbey, A. and Whimbey L. S. (1975) Intelligence Can Be Taught. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Sternberg, R. (1984). Beyond I.Q.: A Triarchic Theory of Human Intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press. Resnick, L (2001) Making America Smarter: The Real Goal of School Reform. In Costa, (Ed) Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking: Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Charbonneau, P., Jackson, H., Kobylski, G., Roginski, J., Sulewski, C., & Wattenberg, F., “Developing Student’s Habits of Mind in Mathematics Programs,” PRIMUS, Vol 19, issue 2, 105, March


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