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National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Ethics in Financial Aid.

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Presentation on theme: "National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Ethics in Financial Aid."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Ethics in Financial Aid

2 Slide 2 Ethics A set of moral principles or values, a theory or system of moral values; the principles of conduct governing an individual or group. (Webster Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary) Standards of right and wrong that prescribe what humans ought to do, usually in terms of rights, obligations, benefits to society, fairness, or specific virtues.

3 Slide 3 Ethics Choosing between 2 rights: An ethical dilemma is a situation that often involves an apparent conflict between moral imperatives, in which to obey one would result in transgressing another.

4 Slide 4 Wisdom We do not receive wisdom. It is something we must discover for ourselves through a journey that no one can take for us nor spare us. It comes from perspectives on things.

5 Slide 5 Three Perspectives on Ethics in Financial Aid We as educators serve a noble purpose: keeping America strong. We are under constant scrutiny, serving many masters with different expectations and different moral imperatives. The moral principles or values by which we are judged and by which we may negotiate our course are universal and unchanging.

6 Slide 6 Three Perspectives on Ethics in Financial Aid 1st Perspective: We as educators serve a noble purpose: keeping America strong.

7 Slide 7 We serve a noble purpose. Horace Mann, writing in the mid-1800’s, called education, “…beyond all other devices of human origin…the great equalizer of the conditions of men—the balance-wheel of the social machinery.”

8 Slide 8 Education: A Noble Purpose Purposes of HE –Create “human capital” –Advance and disseminate knowledge –Promote “civic virtue” –Enable “social mobility” Equity and Excellence in Higher Education, Bowen, Kurzweil and Tobin, 2005

9 Slide 9 Education: A Noble Purpose Complementary Nature of Equity and Excellence –Schools want excellent students –Every pool of talent is needed –Quality of learning is enhanced by diversity –Democracy needs capable participants (Equity and Excellence in Higher Education, Bowen, Kurzweil and Tobin, 2005)

10 Slide 10 Education: A Noble Purpose Institute for Higher Education Policy, 1998 People with a college education: –Participate more effectively in governance –Contribute more liberally of their time and money to community –Consume fewer public services –Contribute more to economic growth and productivity, resulting in a larger economic pie for all

11 Slide 11 Education: A Noble Purpose See Education Pays 2004: The Benefits of Higher Education for Individuals and Society; and Education Pays Update 2005 from College Board’s Trends Reports (http://www.collegeboard.com/press/article/0,,48884,00.html)

12 Slide 12 Education: A Noble Purpose We make dreams come true: –For Individuals –For Democracy We exist for public good. Therefore…….

13 Slide 13 Paying for College Is a Shared Responsibility! Partners Family Governments School Private Sector

14 Slide 14 2nd Perspective We are under constant scrutiny, serving many masters with different expectations and different moral imperatives. Three Perspectives on Ethics in Financial Aid

15 Slide 15 Under Scrutiny of Many Masters Support for HE, Flowing from The Various Sources, Creates Stakeholders Who: –Have vested interests in our choices and actions –View us from different perspectives

16 Slide 16 Under Scrutiny: Stakeholders Students and parents Federal Govt. (ED and Congress) HE Authority and Legislature School (Board, Administration, Colleagues) Donors Professional Associations YOU

17 Slide 17 Under Scrutiny: Valuables Entrusted Families: lives, future, funding Governments: allocations, intent, economic and social well-being School: operating resources (budget, equipment, space, supplies) information, relationships, mission, reputation, future

18 Slide 18 Under Scrutiny: Valuables Entrusted Donors: funds, beneficent intent Prof. Assoc.’s: mission, reputation You: integrity, purpose, happiness

19 Slide 19 “Good intentions randomize behavior.”

20 Slide 20 Financial Need Institutional Priorities Civic Needs Beneficence Achievements Under Scrutiny: Eligibility Criteria

21 Slide 21 Under Scrutiny: Roles We Perform Steward: cultivate and maximize resources entrusted to us—human, financial, physical and consumables Authority: share information and intent; knowledge and values; exercise expertise, including judgment Champion: “Ride for the brand”

22 Slide 22 3rd Perspective The moral principles or values by which we are judged and by which we may negotiate our course are universal and unchanging. Three Perspectives on Ethics in Financial Aid

23 Slide 23 Ethics 1) the discipline of dealing with what is good and bad and with moral duty and obligation; 2) a set of moral principles or values, a theory or system of moral values; the principles of conduct governing an individual or group. (Webster Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary)

24 Slide 24 Moral Principles or Values Where do we turn for guidance? NASFAA Statement of Ethical Principles (http://www.nasfaa.org/annualpubs/NEthical599.ht ml)http://www.nasfaa.org/annualpubs/NEthical599.ht ml The 4-H Club “Work Ethic Guidelines” from Character Counts, LSU Ag Center Research and Extension, Louisiana 4-H

25 Slide 25 NASFAA Statement of Ethical Principles Make every effort to assist students with financial need. Ensure equity by applying all need analysis formulas consistently. Respect the dignity and privacy of students. Do not discriminate. Promote the free expression of ideas and opinions - respect diverse viewpoints. Commit to the highest level of ethical behavior and refrain from conflict of interest.

26 Slide 26 Moral Principles or Values Trustworthiness Respect Responsibility Fairness Caring Citizenship

27 Slide 27 Moral Principles or Values Trustworthiness –Work with little supervision, yet seek guidance as needed. –Be honest and reliable in all dealings. –Refuse to steal, misuse or abuse company time, property or equipment. –Refuse to lie, cheat, deceive, manipulate, exploit or take advantage of others.

28 Slide 28 Moral Principles or Values Respect –Value and honor all people. –Respect the dignity, privacy and freedom of all. –Use good manners. Be courteous and polite. –Listen to and communicate openly with others. –Be friendly and cooperative.

29 Slide 29 Moral Principles or Values Responsibility –Show initiative. Pay attention to detail. Pursue excellence. –Be loyal. –Strive to improve abilities, learn new skills and take on broader responsibilities. –Be accountable. Fulfill commitments, persevere and get the job done.

30 Slide 30 Moral Principles or Values Fairness –Listen. Know your job. Communicate honestly. –Consider all stakeholders and the possible short- and long-term consequences of decisions. –Be free of bias, just, without favoritism or prejudice. –Use tact and courtesy. –Share knowledge, ideas and skills with others.

31 Slide 31 Moral Principles or Values Caring –Strive for harmonious, mutually beneficial relationships. –Show kindness and sensitivity to the feelings of others. –Express gratitude. –Show personal concern for others. –Take time to help others. –Be kind. Be kind. Be kind.

32 Slide 32 Moral Principles or Values Citizenship –Understand and contribute to the organization. –Take care of equipment and resources. –Pursue life-long learning. –Volunteer without expectation of recognition or reward. –Be a role model and mentor to new employees.

33 Slide 33 Education: A Noble Purpose We make dreams come true: –For Individuals –For Our Nation We exist for public good.

34 Slide 34 Under Scrutiny: Roles We Perform Steward: cultivate and maximize resources entrusted to us—human, financial, physical and consumables Authority: share information, knowledge and values; exercise expertise, including judgment Champion: “Ride for the brand”

35 Slide 35 Universal and Unchanging Moral Principles Trustworthiness Respect Responsibility Fairness Caring Citizenship

36 Slide 36 Final Thoughts Desiderata Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexations to the spirit.

37 Slide 37 Final Thoughts If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism.

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