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Personal Priorities Practical Strategies for Managing Your Life and Your Work A Presentation for the 2004 SOMC Respiratory Therapy Seminar Kendall L. Stewart,

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Presentation on theme: "Personal Priorities Practical Strategies for Managing Your Life and Your Work A Presentation for the 2004 SOMC Respiratory Therapy Seminar Kendall L. Stewart,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Personal Priorities Practical Strategies for Managing Your Life and Your Work A Presentation for the 2004 SOMC Respiratory Therapy Seminar Kendall L. Stewart, M.D. March 25, 2004

2 What’s in this for me? There is always more to do than anyone can possibly get done. Because of this, everyone—intentionally or mindlessly—decides on certain priorities and conducts his or her life accordingly. The question is, who is setting your priorities? If you are not, then someone else is, and that is not a prescription for a happy life. After this presentation, you will be able to –Identify three of the demanding “priority setters” in your life, –Describe three unpleasant feelings you experience when you permit others to set your priorities for you. –Specify three practical strategies for taking charge of your own life. –Explain how you can implement these strategies and begin living a more satisfying life—today.

3 What people are doing their very best to set the priorities in your life? Your family Your friends The people at work The people at school Religious people Political people Advertising people Sales people And a lot of other people

4 How do you feel when you live your life according to others’ priorities? Tired Resentful Angry Overwhelmed Hopeless Depressed Unsatisfied And a lot of other unpleasant feelings

5 What are some practical, behavioral strategies for taking charge of your life? Identify your values.* Write clear behavioral expectations.* Identify measurable outcomes.* Examine your daily life. Learn to say, “No”.* Make lists. Discipline yourself. Seek progress instead of perfection. Become more efficient. Delegate appropriately. Avoid distractions. Deal effectively with information overload. Invest in good relationships. Limit pointless rumination. Strive for excellence.* Embrace technology carefully. Blend work and hobbies. Refuse to be held hostage by others’ expectations. Work on your attitude.

6 Develop a blueprint for your life. Why should I? –Sets you apart –Puts you in charge –Clarifies your obligations –Defangs unreasonable guilt –Justifies your decisions –Molds others’ expectations –Holds you accountable –Minimizes distractions –Increases your likelihood of success How can I? –Create three columns on one page. –List your top 10 values in column one. –List three specific behavioral objectives for each value in column two. –List one measurable indicator for each value in column three. –Discuss this with the important people in your life. –Review and revise this document annually.

7 Learn to say, “No.” Why should I? –Fends off demands and requests –Discourages unreasonable expectations –Rebuffs the exploiters –Demands others stop taking you for granted –Builds respect and self- respect –Keeps you in charge –Helps you manage your life How can I? –Recognize the necessity for improvement. –Refuse to let your feelings call the shots. –Exercise your right to reconsider your decisions. –Adopt temporizing phrases. “Let me think about it.” “I don’t know.” “Thank you for asking but.. I’m already swamped.”

8 Strive for excellence. Why should I? –Adds meaning to work –Sets you apart –Puts you in good company –Produces sustained motivation –Provides recurring accomplishments –Decreases your sensitivity to criticism –Strengthens your focus on what matters –Minimizes the distractions in your work How can I? –Write a behavioral description of the excellent RT. –Select a mentor and pick his or her brain. –Become a customer service zealot. –Learn about process improvement. –Serve on a process improvement team. –Identify meaningful process indicators. –Document improvement. –Celebrate.

9 What have I learned? You can’t do it all. If you don’t set your own priorities, others will. You can’t set them if you don’t know what they are. You can’t rely on your feelings to tell you what to do. It pays to figure out what your priorities are. Sticking to your priorities will give you the best chance for a joyful, satisfying life. Perfection is not possible, but progress is.

10 Where can I learn more? Stewart, Kendall L., et. al. A Portable Mentor for Organizational Leaders, SOMCPress, 2003 (This book can be ordered from Stewart, Kendall L., “Physician Traps: Some Practical Ways to Avoid Becoming a Miserable Doctor” A SOMCPress White Paper, SOMCPress, July 24, 2002 Stewart, Kendall L. et. al, “On Being Successful at SOMC: Some Practical Guidelines for New Physicians” A SOMCPress White Paper, SOMCPress, January 2001 Stewart, Kendall L., “Bigwigs Behaving Badly: Understanding and Coping with Notable Misbehavior” A SOMCPress White Paper, SOMCPress, March 11, 2002 (For a limited time, this White Paper can be downloaded from Stewart, Kendall L., “Relationships: Building and Sustaining the Interpersonal Foundations of Organizational Success” A SOMCPress White Paper, SOMCPress, March 11, 2002

11 How can I contact you? Kendall L. Stewart, M.D. Medical Director Southern Ohio Medical Center President & CEO The SOMC Medical Care Foundation, Inc th Street Portsmouth, Ohio

12 Southern Ohio Medical Center   Safety Safety  Quality Quality  Service Service  Relationships Relationships Performance  What questions remain?


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