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471.122005 Winter 8 Business Communication Providence College 471.12 Winter 2005 Bruce Duggan.

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Presentation on theme: "471.122005 Winter 8 Business Communication Providence College 471.12 Winter 2005 Bruce Duggan."— Presentation transcript:

1 Winter 8 Business Communication Providence College Winter 2005 Bruce Duggan

2 2005 Winter BC Resumes Resumes 101  this Friday  right after this class  1 hr Follow-up?

3 2005 Winter BC Last quiz Ch 5 & 6  Average 68%  that’s not good enough  3 people got 100%  4 got less than 50%

4 2005 Winter BC Next quiz This Friday  Ch 7  Ch 9  Handbook 4.1Frequently confused words 1.1Nouns 1.2Pronouns

5 2005 Winter BC Case Intel  General comments Analysis  Generally quite good Presentations  Most groups dressed up!!!  Fairly polished  Sometimes too many words Write-ups  Some read like a first draft

6 2005 Winter BC Case Intel  General comments Analysis  Generally quite good Presentations  Most groups dressed up!!!  Fairly polished  Sometimes too many words Write-ups  Some read like a first draft

7 2005 Winter BC Analysis Opening Summaries  The problem facing Intel is that they have distributed a defective product and, as a result, their customers are dissatisfied. Intel has to regain the trust that was lost.

8 2005 Winter BC Analysis Opening Summaries  Having a defective product will hurt any company, but the damage done can largely be controlled. How the company reacts will either minimize or amplify the effect of the defect. Intel’s response.

9 2005 Winter BC Analysis Opening Summaries  Intel has dismissed a Pentium chip flaw as a small problem, even when customers complained. Intel must accept that they made a mistake and take steps to rectify the problem in order to maintain customer trust.

10 2005 Winter BC Analysis Christian Perspective  Innovative & surprising offer hospitality to one another without grumbling.  Intel failed to be a hospitable company to their customers. …the fruit of the Spirit is…kindness…  Intel seems to have misplaced this fruit when it comes to customer relations.

11 2005 Winter BC Analysis Christian Perspective  Innovative & surprising To act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with our God.  To act justly, Intel could have replaced the chip for anyone who complained. To love mercy, Intel could have handled their customers with more care. To walk humbly, Intel could have acted more openly, avoiding the disgrace that came from arrogance.

12 2005 Winter BC Analysis Christian Perspective  Innovative & surprising But suppose the ox had a reputation for goring, and the owner had been informed but failed to keep it under control. If the ox then kills someone, it must be stoned, and the owner must also be put to death.

13 2005 Winter BC Case Intel  General comments Analysis Presentations  Most groups dressed up!!!  Fairly polished  Sometimes too many words Write-ups  Some read like a first draft

14 2005 Winter BC Retailer Contract Customer can go to the local retailer A place for repairs or replacements, with no charge to the customer This shows that Intel know they made a mistake and is ready to take responsibility and fix it as soon as possible Presentations

15 2005 Winter BC Case Intel  General comments Analysis Presentations Write-ups  Some read like a first draft

16 2005 Winter BC Write-ups  Write  Rehearse  Rewrite  Re-rehearse

17 2005 Winter BC

18 2005 Winter BC

19 2005 Winter BC

20 2005 Winter BC 1a  The problem, although it was small and it did not affect anyone, it became big because of other problems.

21 2005 Winter BC 1b ...personal customers were being charged extra for replacing defective chip, which is not their fault but company’s.

22 2005 Winter BC 2a  Intel’s credibility at the moment is poor. We suggest that Intel build back its credibility. By hiring a well know trusted computer guru to publish something that will convince the public that Intel has solved the problems they had with the chips.

23 2005 Winter BC 2b  To deal with conflict there are many ways. Some ways of dealing with conflict is talking it through. Or, figuring out what both parties want and come up with an arbitrary solution. Or, battling it out until some one loses or gives up. Some ways end better than others.

24 2005 Winter BC 3a  It was suggested that Intel run high profile ads to fully explain the issue and to commit to replace the chip for any consumer who asked

25 2005 Winter BC 3b  This will provide Intel’s customers with information by: Explain the technical problem Admit mistakes Describe the process involved to fix the problem

26 2005 Winter BC 4a  Intel also tried to hide the fact that the chip was defective and when one of their customers came to them with the problem, they said that it wouldn’t matter and that is would only happen once every 27,000 years.

27 2005 Winter BC 4b  In another situation, Intel’s president and CEO used discourtesy verbal language to IBM when they announced stop shipments for Intel PCs.

28 2005 Winter BC 5a  Later on when the company was dealing with the problem of what to do later on, and they shied away from total recall, or replacing every faulty chip, the company was looked upon as a company that didn’t really care about the individual—which in the personal computer business, is a big problem.

29 2005 Winter BC 5b  Intel failed to communicate that they were recognizing the problem and were taking steps to fit it and as such the public viewed Intel as ignorant.

30 2005 Winter BC 6a  It is important that when there is a problem or defect that Intel make an announcement and bring awareness about it rather than the press because they may confuse the situation and it make Intel look bad. But it is important that Intel does this because other wise the may get a bad image rather than if they do this then the customers see that they take responsibility and want to do what they can to fix the problem as soon as possible.

31 2005 Winter BC 6b  The recommendation that is advised to Intel is to take the three alternatives available to them and implement them all.

32 2005 Winter BC Next Case Perrier  Hand out This Fri  Presentation Fri 1 Apr  (note change)  everyone to read by this Tuesday

33 Winter 8 9B

34 Winter 8 Quiz Ch 7 Ch 9

35 2005 Winter BC Resumes Resumes 101  right after this class  1 hr

36 2005 Winter BC Case 2 Perrier Everyone read by this Tuesday  Write-up  Note changes  Use formats from textbook  Presentation Fri 1 Apr  Note date change

37 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages ch 9 Let’s not talk about ads  Writing and speaking to convince Internal External

38 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages Opening capture attention benefits Body build interest create desire to agree then >> main idea Closerequest action Remember…? A I D A

39 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages Opening capture attention benefits Body build interest create desire to agree then >> main idea Closerequest action Remember…? A I D A

40 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages Opening capture attention benefits Body build interest create desire to agree then >> main idea Closerequest action Remember…? Attention Interest Desire Action

41 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze  Gauge  Establish  Strive  Choose

42 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience  Establish credibility  Strive for ethical standards  Choose an approach

43 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose goal merits

44 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience What will move them? needs desires hopes fears interests goals values beliefs

45 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience What will move them? Will they be resistant? needs desires hopes fears interests goals values beliefs

46 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience What will move them? Will they be resistant? Can I reduce resistance? needs desires hopes fears interests goals values beliefs

47 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience What will move them? Will they be resistant? Can I reduce resistance? Should I? needs desires hopes fears interests goals values beliefs

48 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience  Establish credibility Support with facts Name your sources Build expertise Establish common ground

49 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Analyze purpose  Gauge audience  Establish credibility  Strive for high ethical standards

50 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Strive for high ethical standards “avoid fraud” “try to persuade without manipulating” not good enough too negative too vague too low

51 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Strive for high ethical standards …whatever is true whatever is noble whatever is right whatever is pure whatever is lovely whatever is admirable… needs desires hopes fears interests goals values beliefs

52 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Strive for high ethical standards  Choose an approach

53 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach direct indirect

54 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach direct indirect

55 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach direct indirect logical emotional

56 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach direct indirect logical emotional

57 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach direct indirect logical emotional

58 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach Preferences  audience  organization  you Probable reactions  audience  unintended audiences direct indirect logical emotional

59 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach Logical  Inductive  Deductive  Precedent  Analogy logical emotional

60 2005 Winter BC Persuasive Messages 1.Plan  Choose an approach Emotional  desires  hopes  fears  values  beliefs logical emotional

61 2005 Winter BC Next Week One class only  discuss Perrier

62 2005 Winter BC Guidelines for a Logical, Sound Argument Avoid hasty generalizations Avoid begging the question Avoid attacking your opponent Avoid oversimplifying a complex opponent Avoid assuming a false cause Avoid faulty analogies Avoid illogical support

63 2005 Winter BC How to Grab Your Audience’s Attention Provide a piece of genuine news. Appeal personally to the reader’s emotions. Tout your product’s most attractive feature. Provide some intriguing numbers. Include a sample of the product. Reinforce a concrete illustration with some story appeal. Share a specific trait with the audience. Issue a challenge. Provide a solution to a problem.

64 2005 Winter BC How to Strengthen a Persuasive Message Use semantics effectively. Be moderate. Focus on your goal. Use simple language. Anticipate opposition. Provide support. Be specific. Create a win-win situation. Time your message to be effective. Speak metaphorically and use anecdotes.

65 2005 Winter BC Overcoming Resistance Don’t use a hard-sell. Don’t resist compromise. Don’t rely solely on great arguments. Don’t assume persuasion is a one-shot effort. Objective 4 Objective 4

66 2005 Winter BC Selling Points and Benefits Establish value in the minds of your audience by  Including the “what’s in it for me?” information  Triggering and channelling emotional responses

67 2005 Winter BC What are some questions to ask when gauging the audience’s needs during the planning of a persuasive message? What role do demographics and psychographics play in audience analysis during the planning of a persuasive message? What are four ways you can build credibility with an audience when planning a persuasive message? Let’s Assess Test Your Knowledge continued


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