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Extreme Makeovers: Histories of Self-Fashioning in the Mid-Atlantic November 4, 2006 Historical Society of Pennsylvania Patrick M. Erben “In these Seven.

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Presentation on theme: "Extreme Makeovers: Histories of Self-Fashioning in the Mid-Atlantic November 4, 2006 Historical Society of Pennsylvania Patrick M. Erben “In these Seven."— Presentation transcript:

1 Extreme Makeovers: Histories of Self-Fashioning in the Mid-Atlantic November 4, 2006 Historical Society of Pennsylvania Patrick M. Erben “In these Seven Languages”: Francis Daniel Pastorius and the Writing of the Multilingual Self

2 Pastorius, Bee-Hive. Ms. Codex 726. Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania.

3 In these Seven Languages I this my Book do own, [...] Friend, if thou find it, Send the same to Germantown; Thy Recompense shall be the half of half a Crown: But, tho’ it be no more than half the half of this, Pray! Be Content therewith, & think it not amiss. Yea and if, when thou com’st, my Cash perhaps is gone, (For Money is thus scarce, that Often I have none) A Cup of Drink may do [...]. (Bee-Hive 3)

4 Pastorius, Ship-Mate-Ship. An Omer full of Manna, For Mary, Rachel, Hannah [...]. Ms. Pastorius Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. I’m far from Flattering! and hope, ye read my Mind, Who can’t, nor dare forget a Ship-mate true & kind, As he your Father was to me, (an Alien) My Lot being newly cast among such English men, Whose Speech I thought was Welsh, their Words a Canting Tune, Alone with him I could in Latin then commune: Which Tongue he did pronounce right in our German way, Hence presently we knew, what he or I would say. Moreover to the best of my Rememberance, We never disagreed, or were at Variance; Because God’s sacred Truth, (whereat we both did aim,) To her indeared Friends is every where the same. (Ship-Mate-Ship 4)

5 Pastorius, “Letter to Isaac Norris. Germantown, March 15, 1716/7.” MS. George W. Norris Papers. HSP. My Rare and Real Friend, as I at present may Justly Stile thee according to the Old & true Saying, A Friend In Need is a Friend IN deed. The Letter, which I joyfully received from thy hands the Night before yesterday, abounding in extraordinary Cherishing and refreshing Terms, Seemed little Inferior to me, than if thou hadst Personally Visited thy poor Friend.

6 Pastorius, Henry Bernhard Koster, William Davis, Thomas Rutter &Thomas Bowyer, four Boasting Disputers Of this World briefly Rebuked, And Answered according to their Folly, which they themselves have manifested in a late Pamphlet, entituled, Advice for all Professors and writers. New York: William Bradford, 1697.

7 Pastorius, A New Primmer or Methodical Directions To attain the True Spelling, Reading & Writing of ENGLISH. Whereunto are added, some things Necessary & Useful both for the Youth of this Province, and likewise for those, who from forreign Countries and Nations come to settle amongst us. New York: William Bradford, [1698].

8 Pastorius, Bee-Hive. Ms. Codex 726. Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania. By adding [a] few lines I do expect No Briths [sic.] by birth to teach, but to direct My loving Countrymans (:the Dutch’s:) defect. Who English’d does himself to them connect. (Bee-Hive, “Silvula Rhytmorum Germanopolitanorum” # 48).

9 Pastorius, Bee-Hive. Ms. Codex 726. Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania. How happy could men be in all their Course of life, If they did strive to love as they do love to strive. = Wie klüglich könnten wir Ja glücklich allhier leben, Wann Lieben uns so lieb wolt seÿn als widerstreben. (“Silvula” #71)

10 Pastorius, Bee-Hive. Ms. Codex 726. Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania. The language nowadays spoken in England & Colonies thereunto belonging is not the ancient Britain-Tongue, No not the least Offspring thereof; But a Mingle-mangle of Latin, Dutch & French: Relicks or Remains of the Roman, Saxon & Norman Conquests. Most Mono Syllables are of a Dutch Origin, ax, ox [...] Words of many syllables are either brought by the Romans [...] Or by the Normans [...] And besides those there are also Hebrew, Arabick, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Danish and Welsh words in the said English Tongue. [...] Hence it is that when other Europeans cannot deliver their minds but by expressing one thing by one word ye English may do it commonly by two; Oftentimes three or four. (4)


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