Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

2008 ASTM WISE Presentation By James Bryce 2008 ASTM WISE Intern Civil Engineering - University of Missouri Developing Sustainable Infrastructure; Exploring.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "2008 ASTM WISE Presentation By James Bryce 2008 ASTM WISE Intern Civil Engineering - University of Missouri Developing Sustainable Infrastructure; Exploring."— Presentation transcript:

1 2008 ASTM WISE Presentation By James Bryce 2008 ASTM WISE Intern Civil Engineering - University of Missouri Developing Sustainable Infrastructure; Exploring the Implementation of Green Highway Classifications

2 2 Americans combine to drive over 3 trillion miles on more than 4 million miles of roads last year. Many people strive to drive more efficient cars for environment and wallet. Few people realize that the roads we drive on can be more economically and environmentally sustainable.

3 3 Presentation Points 1. Purpose of Study 2. Sustainability 3. Role of Green Highways 4. Current Activities 5. Designing a Rating System 6. Questions

4 4 Purpose of Study 1. To define sustainability in highway design. 2. To evaluate current green highway practices. 3. To evaluate the design of a green highway rating system.

5 5 What is Sustainability? The WCED defines sustainable development as, “…meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

6 6 Why Care About Sustainable Development? Today’s needs have outgrown yesterdays projections. There has been much concern about mans impact on the environment. A way to build now without consuming excessive resources.

7 7 What is the Role of a Green Highway in Sustainable Infrastructure? Highways are the most vast piece of civil infrastructure. America has over 4 million miles of roads. Green highways will ensure that highway infrastructure is functional for future.

8 8 The Role of Ratings and Classifications Green highway classifications will help steer research needs and resources. Classifications will provide goals for highway departments to strive towards.

9 9 Green Highways Partnership The GHP is comprised of many public/private agencies. Goal is to incorporate environmental stewardship in all highway projects.

10 10 Rating Systems in the U.S. Green Roads was developed in Washington State. It contains a point system much like the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Many officials are concerned with its’ ability to be implemented outside the Northwest.

11 11 Needs for a Dynamic System We need to recognize the importance of a dynamic system by understanding; 1. We cannot group every highway under the same classification system. 2. Should encourage continued research by setting a moving standard always above industry practices

12 12 How Should the System be Designed? A general set of key areas need to be developed Regional experts should present the needs for their particular area Individual topics within each key area should be developed

13 13 Key Areas for the Development of a Green Highway

14 14 Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Lifecycle Energy and Emissions Reduction Recycle, Reuse and Renewable Overall Societal Benefits Conservation and Ecosystem Management Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Divert and Treat Storm Water Runoff Natural treatment methods also reduce peak flows into streams and reduce scouring.

15 15 Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Lifecycle Energy and Emissions Reduction Recycle, Reuse and Renewable Overall Societal Benefits Conservation and Ecosystem Management Energy & Emissions Reduction Energy – Given projected cement production, using 50% fly ash can save the equivalent energy in 6.4 billion gallons of gas annually. Emissions sets a standard to mitigate congestion. – 2.9 billion gallons of gas was wasted due to vehicles in congestion in 2007.

16 16 Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Lifecycle Energy and Emissions Reduction Recycle, Reuse and Renewable Overall Societal Benefits Conservation and Ecosystem Management Recycle Reuse and Use Renewable Many recycled/renewable materials produce a cost benefit. – INDOT to be discussed soon Extensive studies have been implemented. – 2004 to 2005 study showed Avoided equivalent CO2 emissions of 4.2 million tons Water savings over 55 million gallons

17 17 Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Lifecycle Energy and Emissions Reduction Recycle, Reuse and Renewable Conservation and Ecosystem Management Overall Societal Benefits Conservation and Ecosystem Management Provide animal crossing structures. Wildlife buffer zones Reduce animal vehicle crashes by 97%

18 18 Watershed Driven Storm Water Management Lifecycle Energy and Emissions Reduction Recycle, Reuse and Renewable Conservation and Ecosystem Management Overall Societal Benefits Overall Societal Benefits Highways are tied to the quality of life in a particular area. Highways have an important economic role. Many benefits are presented in the previous four areas.

19 19 How to Rate a Highway 1. Determine minimum current industry practices. 2. Determine the maximum feasible improvement. 3. Rate the highway.

20 20 Step 1 – Determine Current Industry Practices Important to develop a baseline to reference. Will keep the system updated to only give credit for exceeding industry standards.

21 21 Step 2 – Determine the Maximum Feasible Improvement Will provide a “Closed End” to the rating scale. As technologies advance, the ceiling will get higher and higher.

22 22 Step 3 – Grade the System Determine where the highway falls on the relative rating scale. Allows evaluation of best practices on a case by case basis.

23 23 How to Achieve Green Highways Research needs to be recognized as key to the future of our infrastructure. INDOT case study cited a savings of over $151,000 in one month because of a particular highway research project. Fly ash was extended to be used further into the year.

24 24 How to Achieve Green Highways Cont’d Develop a national research database on the topic of sustainable infrastructure Too many research results are difficult to find, resulting in time and money to be lost searching.

25 25 How to Achieve Green Highways Cont’d Have a clearly defined role for federal programs. – Many FHWA officials stay away from overly influencing state agencies. – FHWA role is to being leaders in national mobility, stewards for national highway programs, and innovators for a better future GAO report GAO sites the need to restructure federal infrastructure programs.

26 26 A Future for the Nations Infrastructure Green construction has been implemented in the structural market successfully. We need innovative ways to solve environmental issues while maintaining a strong infrastructure.

27 27 Recommendations 1. A Unified Research Database 2. Continued Research Funding 3. More FHWA involvement 4. Incentives for green highways 5. Designing a dynamic – sliding scale – rating system

28 28 Questions? Thanks to the WISE program; ASTM (especially Jim O, Kevin, and Jeff); Dr. Jeffrey King FMR, Erica Wissolik, and Melissa Carl. Special Thanks to Rebecca for support and encouragement. Mostly thanks to my fellow interns who became family to me.


Download ppt "2008 ASTM WISE Presentation By James Bryce 2008 ASTM WISE Intern Civil Engineering - University of Missouri Developing Sustainable Infrastructure; Exploring."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google