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Management Strategies for Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries-- 2013 and Beyond Oregon and Washington Agency Analysis and Recommendations.

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Presentation on theme: "Management Strategies for Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries-- 2013 and Beyond Oregon and Washington Agency Analysis and Recommendations."— Presentation transcript:

1 Management Strategies for Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries and Beyond Oregon and Washington Agency Analysis and Recommendations for Workgroup November 15, 2012

2 Premise: Recreational and commercial fisheries economically vital to OR and WA Objective: Optimize economic value within conservation framework Key Elements/Principles: Prioritize recreational fisheries in mainstem; commercial in off- channel Develop selective commercial gear and techniques; phase out non-selective gill nets in the mainstem Enhance off-channel commercial fisheries Secure conservation benefits (e.g., reducing hatchery fish on spawning grounds) Provide a transition period for full implementation Avoid significant economic loss during transition; ensure overall economic gains long-term Background

3 Complete policy development in 2012 Revisit issue in future and adjust course if key assumptions prove wrong Key elements are a package and should be considered as a whole Flexibility to extend transition slightly if necessary Flexibility to moderate 70:30 shift (summer and fall) if necessary to lessen commercial economic loss and reasonable recreational objectives can be met Provide conservation benefits by selective mainstem commercial harvest of lower river hatchery coho and Chinook Additional Clarification/Guidance

4 Most elements consistent w/Joint-Agency Report Summer Chinook: No transition; end targeted commercial fisheries in 2013 Sturgeon: If no uptick in 2012, end targeted commercial fishery and allow only catch-and-release recreational fishery Upriver Bright Chinook: Retain mainstem large-mesh gillnet option above Lewis River in the fall season only Seines: Begin pilot mainstem commercial fishery 2013 Target mark-selective coho fishery in October Spring Chinook: Tangle-net only beginning in 2013 Washington Recommendations ( )

5 Incorporate WA recommendations into Joint- Agency Report and reconcile differences Analyze scenario to achieve 0-5% overall impact to commercial fisheries during transition (5-10% now) Clarify adaptive management strategy and identify elements of a commercial buy-back program Identify some elements of commercial advisor recommendations to incorporate into Joint-Agency Report Ask HSRG for review of conservation benefits and risks WG Directions From Last Meeting

6 Modified Joint Agency Report w/appendices Incorporated WA Workgroup member recommendations, and reconciled differences into single path forward Analyzed scenario to achieve no more than 0-5% overall economic harm to commercial fishery for transition Incorporated several elements from Commercial Advisor recommendations (10/10/12) Preliminary draft conservation analysis from HSRG Tangle net regulations Materials Provided

7 Transition ( ) Allocations: 70:30 sport:commercial for spring Chinook and sockeye 60:40 initially ( ) for summer Chinook, then 70:30 65:35 for tule fall Chinook Upriver Bright: depends on run size and meeting sport obj. (model shows ~40:60 for large runs meets sport objectives and provides commercial access) No substantive change for coho Off-Channel Enhancements: M spring Chinook (750k OR, 250k WA): 83% increase 920k coho (720k OR, 200k WA): 24% increase 500k select area bright fall Chinook (OR): 33% increase Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

8 Transition ( ) “Reasonable” fall Chinook sport fishery objectives: Buoy 10 through Labor Day Tongue Pt to Warrior Rock through mid September (MSF?) Warrior Rock to Bonneville full fishery Commercial characteristics: Mainstem opportunity spring, summer and fall Tangle and gill nets allowed in mainstem; plus alt gear if approved 25% more adult Chs in off-channel immediately; ~25% more adult coho and 33% more SABs mid way through transition Substantive upriver bright Chf opportunity in mainstem New opportunity for hatchery tule and coho if alt gear approved Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

9 Transition ( ) Recreational Fishery Impacts: 45k angler trip (15%) increase Commercial Fishery Impacts: $200k to $1.1M (5-30%) increase Includes alt gear harvest of hatchery tules and coho Includes full harvest of available Upriver Bright fall Chinook Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

10 Long Term (2017+) Allocations: 80:20 sport:commercial for spring Chinook and sockeye 80:20 for summer Chinook; if <90k run no commercial < 80:20 for tule fall Chinook (model shows 65:35 will meet sport obj. and provide commercial access to hatchery fish) < 80:20 for Upriver Bright; depends on run-size and meeting sport obj. (model shows ~40:60 for large run sizes will meet sport objectives and provide commercial access) No substantive change for coho Off-Channel Enhancements: Up to 1.25 M spring Chinook (1M OR, 250k WA): ~100% increase Up to 4.7 M coho (4.5M OR, 200k WA): ~100% increase 750k select area bright fall Chinook (OR): ~50% increase Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

11 Long Term (2017+) “Reasonable” fall Chinook sport fishery objectives: Buoy 10 through Labor Day Tongue Pt to Warrior Rock through mid September (MSF?) Warrior Rock to Bonneville full fishery Commercial characteristics: Tangle nets and other selective gear in mainstem Infrequent opportunity for Chs in mainstem Off-channel: ~100% more adult Chs; 50% more SAB and coho Substantive upriver bright Chf opportunity in mainstem New substantive opportunity for hatchery tule, coho and upriver bright fall Chinook in mainstem Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

12 Long Term (2017+) Recreational Fishery Impacts: 67k angler trip (23%) increase Commercial Fishery Impacts: : $550k (15%) increase 2021+: $840k (23%) increase Includes alt gear harvest of hatchery tules, coho and upriver bright fall Chinook in mainstem Includes full harvest of available Upriver Bright fall Chinook Includes increased harvest of off-channel salmon Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

13 Sturgeon (2013+) 10% additional conservation buffer set aside from harvestable surplus Remaining harvestable surplus allocated 80:20 sport: commercial If abundance does not increase, allow only non- retention fisheries until decline is reversed Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

14 Additional Measures for Recreational Fishery (Based on Commercial Advisor input) Barbless hooks Rubber landing nets Recovery boxes in guide boats (>20 ft length) Restricted sport fishing w/in and adjacent to off-channel areas until economic benefits verified 5-fish seasonal limit for CR spring Chinook CR Endorsement for OR to help fund plan Create limited-entry guide program for CR Require guide logbooks Joint-Agency Report/Appendices (11/9/12)

15 Continues conservation progression Small escapement increase for some wild runs (e.g., spring Chinook) Increased harvest rate on hatchery salmon Reduced hatchery fish on spawning grounds, particularly tules, coho and spring Chinook (Sandy/Willamette) Increased protection of white sturgeon Monitoring and adaptive management important Conservation Impacts

16 Adaptive Management Commissions track implementation and results; initial review end of 2014, comprehensive review end of transition If initial assumptions prove wrong (e.g., >0-5% negative overall economic impact during transition), determine causes and make adjustments to correct course to stay on track Significantly lower than expected returns to off- channel sites Insufficient space in off-channel sites to accommodate the commercial fleet Significantly lower than expected mainstem commercial harvest using selective gears

17 Adaptive Management (cont’d): Circumstances that delay or preclude implementation Significantly lower than expected economic return to commercial fishers Conflicts with terms of the US v Oregon Management Agreement Failure to meet conservation needs

18 WG recommendations to WA and OR commissions Commissions consider policy adoption / OARs at December meetings Budget needs incorporated into GRB and considered by Legislature in New authorities (e.g., gear, ESA coverage) acquired as needed Next Steps

19 Questions?

20 20 Columbia River Warrior Rock – Lewis R Tongue Point – Rocky Point Buoy 10 Astoria- Megler Bridge

21 Multnomah Channel Youngs Bay Deep River Blind Slough / Knappa Slough Tongue Point / South Channel Cowlitz River Select Area Sites Washington Oregon


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