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WATER 101 Elijah Standing Warrior. Advances in Source/Treatment Management March 30, 2011 CANV AWWA San Dieguito Water District www.ci.encinitas.ca.us/Government/CityD/SanDWD/

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Presentation on theme: "WATER 101 Elijah Standing Warrior. Advances in Source/Treatment Management March 30, 2011 CANV AWWA San Dieguito Water District www.ci.encinitas.ca.us/Government/CityD/SanDWD/"— Presentation transcript:

1 WATER 101 Elijah Standing Warrior

2 Advances in Source/Treatment Management March 30, 2011 CANV AWWA San Dieguito Water District Santa Fe Irrigation District Ops Manager:Cor Shaffer Chief Operator:Elijah Standing Warrior Maint. Super.:David Harris Laboratory: Tim Bailey

3 13 MGD Clearwell Flocculation and Sedimentation Ops. Bldg. And Filters Sludge Processing Chem. Storage SDR Raw Water Pipeline LH - Raw Water Pipeline Filter Backwash Water Recovery Treated Backwash and LH Return Line to SDR Treated Water to SFID/SDWD Hydroplant CWA Flow Control Facility Imported Water Aqueducts

4 Service Area and Facilities Treat and Deliver drinking water to 60,000 SFID and SDWD customers Operate a 40 MGD Conventional Water Treatment Plant Utilize Local Water Resources Over 60% of the water delivered to our Customers (10,500 AF/Year) Variable Yield and Quality Inexpensive and Locally Controlled/Available Generate Electricity (imported water)

5 Outline 1.Discuss sources of imported water, which Agencies are involved and what their roles are. 2.Information on the San Diego County Water Authority’s (CWA) Emergency Storage Project (ESP) And their goals to diversify the County’s water sources. 3.Information on the rules and regulations that public water systems have to follow. 4.Information on different types of treatment used in the county. Site specific details of the challenges in the Santa Fe Irrigation District.

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7 Have you ever wondered where the water you drink and use comes from? To reach many of us, water must travel long distances through complex delivery systems such as the California State Water Project. The SWP is the nation's largest state-built water and power development and conveyance system. Planned, designed, constructed and now operated and maintained by the California Department of Water Resources, this unique facility provides water supplies for 25 million Californians and 750,000 acres of irrigated farmland. Scope The California State Water Project is a water storage and delivery system of reservoirs, aqueducts, powerplants and pumping plants. Its main purpose is to store water and distribute it to 29 urban and agricultural water suppliers in Northern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the San Joaquin Valley, the Central Coast, and Southern California. Of the contracted water supply, 70 percent goes to urban users and 30 percent goes to agricultural users. The Project makes deliveries to two-thirds of California's population. It is maintained and operated by the California Department of Water Resources. The Project is also operated to improve water quality in the Delta, control Feather River flood waters, provide recreation, and enhance fish and wildlife.

8 Here's a statistic: the State of California consumes more energy pumping water around, than some other states use for their entire energy needs.

9 The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a consortium of 26 cities and water districts that provides drinking water to nearly 19 million people in parts of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. The mission of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is to provide its service area with adequate and reliable supplies of high-quality water to meet present and future needs in an environmentally and economically responsible way. Metropolitan currently delivers an average of 1.7 billion gallons of water per day to a 5,200-square-mile service area.

10 Palo Verde Irrigation District, the Yuma Project, Imperial Irrigation District and the Coachella Valley Water District (refer to map below) are the agricultural entities holding the first three priorities to the use of no more than 3.85 million acre-feet under the water delivery contracts. The Metropolitan Water District (MWD) was allotted 550,000 acre-feet per year under a fourth priority right and 662,000 acre-feet per year under a fifth priority right. (The city of San Diego and San Diego County conveyed their water rights to MWD.) MWD holds a contract to divert additional 180,000 acre-feet of surplus water on an annual basis.

11 Water from the Colorado River is delivered into MWD’s service area via the Colorado River Aqueduct (CRA). MWD diverts water from Lake Havasu, above Parker Dam. Between 1986 and 1999, the amount of water unused by agriculture and available to MWD has varied from zero to more than 500,000 acre-feet. This unused amount will continue to vary in the future as it is tied to economics, the type of crops planted, acreage irrigated, and the efficiency with which water is used.

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13 The San Diego County Water Authority’s mission is to provide a safe and reliable supply of water to its member agencies serving the San Diego region. When formed on June 9, 1944, the Water Authority initially served nine member agencies. The Water Authority now has 24 member agencies in San Diego County.

14 Water Authority Aqueduct System Including Water Treatment Plants

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16 Water Authority Aqueduct System

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18 Lake Hodges Dam San Dieguito Pump Station San Dieguito Reservoir Cielo Pump Station North No Scale Feb 2011 R. E. Badger Filtration Plant Imported Water Aqueduct Lake Hodges to Olivenhain Pipeline Pump/Hydro Station Olivenhain WTP Olivenhain Reservoir EMERGENCY STORAGE PROJECT

19 The Twin Oaks Valley Water Treatment Plant is the largest submerged membrane water treatment plant in the world and the first treatment plant built by the San Diego County Water Authority. Construction began in 2005 and was completed in April Located next to the Water Authority’s aqueduct north of the city of San Marcos, the high-capacity treatment plant can produce up to 100 million gallons of treated water per day -- enough to supply up to 220,000 typical four-person households each year.

20 Hydro Electric Plant Mercy Road

21 San Vicente Pumping Facilities San Vicente Pumping Facilities will move up to 300 million gallons of water per day from San Vicente Reservoir through the San Vicente Pipeline to the Water Authority’s water delivery system in the event of a water supply emergency.

22 San Vicente Dam RaiseSan Vicente Dam Raise will increase the height of the dam by 117 feet to store an additional 152,000 acre-feet of water, more than doubling the capacity of San Vicente Reservoir.

23 San Vicente Pipeline San Vicente Pipeline is an 11-mile, large-diameter pipeline that will operate with other Water Authority facilities to deliver water from San Vicente Reservoir to water agencies in the central and southern half of the county during emergencies.

24 Olivenhain Dam and ReservoirOlivenhain Dam and Reservoir was the San Diego region’s first major new dam and reservoir in 50 years. Construction on the dam began in August 2000 and was complete in Olivenhain Reservoir has a storage capacity of 24,000 acre-feet of water.

25 Lake Hodges ProjectsLake Hodges Projects will connect the city of San Diego’s Hodges Reservoir, also called Lake Hodges, to the Water Authority’s Olivenhain Reservoir. The connection provides the ability to store 20,000 acre- feet of water in Hodges Reservoir for emergency use.

26 Poseidon Desalination Site

27 Desalination Process

28 Multiple Choice Question What is the name of the agency that delivers water to its 24 member agencies in the San Diego region? A. City of San Diego B. Metropolitan Water District of Southern California C. San Diego County Water Authority D. Department of Water Resources Answer: CWA

29 Eight Content Requirements of a CCR Item 1 ► : Water System Information – Name/phone number of a contact person; information on public participation opportunities. Item 2 ► : Source(s) of Water. Item 3 ► : Definitions – Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL); MCL Goal (MCLG); Treatment Technique (TT); Action Level (AL); Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL); MRDL Goal (MRDLG). Item 4 ► : Detected Contaminants – A table summarizing reported concentrations and relevant MCLs and MCLGs or MRDLs and MRDLGs; known source of detected contaminants; health effects language. Item 5 ► : Information on Monitoring for Cryptosporidium, Radon, and Other Contaminants (if detected). Item 6 ► : Compliance with Other Drinking Water Regulations (any violations and Ground Water Rule [GWR] special notices). Item 7 ► : Variances and Exemptions (if applicable). Item 8 ► : Required Educational Information – Explanation of contaminants in drinking water and bottled water; information to vulnerable populations about Cryptosporidium; statements on nitrate, arsenic, and lead PurposeImprove public health protection by providing educational material to allow consumers to make educated decisions regarding any potential health risks pertaining to the quality, treatment, and management of their drinking water supply. General DescriptionThe CCR Rule requires all community water systems to prepare and distribute a brief annual water quality report summarizing information regarding source water, detected contaminants, compliance, and educational information. Consumer Confidence Report Rule

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31 Tier 1 Notification (Primary Standard) 1.Nitrite Exceedance 2.Perchlorate Exceedance 3.Chlorine Dioxide Exceedance 4.Chlorite Exceedance 5.Fecal Coli form or E Coli 6.Turbidity Exceedance

32 IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable. Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. DRINKING WATER WARNING [System] water has high levels of chlorine dioxide PREGNANT WOMEN AND YOUNG CHILDREN SHOULD NOT DRINK THE WATER Sampling results received [date] showed chlorine dioxide levels of [level and units]. This is above the standard, or maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL), of 0.8 milligrams per liter. Chlorine dioxide is used for disinfection, but too much of it over a short period of time may harm the development of children, infants, and fetuses. What should I do? DO NOT USE THIS WATER IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR GIVE IT TO YOUNG CHILDREN. Some infants and young children who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL could experience nervous system effects. Similar effects may occur in fetuses of pregnant women who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL. Some people may experience anemia. The chlorine dioxide violations reported today include exceedances of the State standard within the distribution system that delivers water to consumers. These violations may harm human health based on short-term exposures. Certain groups, including fetuses, infants, and young children, may be especially susceptible to nervous system effects from excessive chlorine dioxide exposure. There are no obvious symptoms, but chlorine dioxide can affect development of the nervous system. Water, juice, and formula for young children and for pregnant women should not be prepared with tap water. Bottled water should be used until further notice. Because the potential health effects of chlorine dioxide are based on tests on laboratory animals, there is no way to determine at exactly what age for young children the water is safe to drink. You may want to err on the side of caution. Adults who are not pregnant can drink the tap water because their nervous systems are already developed. If you have other health issues concerning the consumption of the water, you may wish to consult your doctor. What happened? What is being done? Chlorine dioxide is used in small amounts every day to kill bacteria and other organisms that may be in your drinking water. [Describe corrective action and when you expect to return to compliance]. For more information, please contact [name of contact] at [phone number] or [mailing address]. Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this public notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail. Secondary Notification Requirements Upon receipt of notification from a person operating a public water system, the following notification must be given within 10 days [Health and Safety Code Section (g)]: SCHOOLS: Must notify school employees, students, and parents (if the students are minors). RESIDENTIAL RENTAL PROPERTY OWNERS OR MANAGERS (including nursing homes and care facilities): Must notify tenants. BUSINESS PROPERTY OWNERS, MANAGERS, OR OPERATORS: Must notify employees of businesses located on the property. This notice is being sent to you by [system]. State Water System ID#:_____________. Date distributed: _____________.

33 Tier 2 Notification (Secondary Standard) 1.Fluoride MCL Notice 2.TCR Resolved Notice 3.LCR Failure Notice

34 IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable. Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. [System] Has Levels of Fluoride Above the Drinking Water Standard Our water system recently violated a drinking water standard. Although this is not an emergency, as our customers, you have a right to know what you should do, what happened, and what we are doing to correct this situation. We routinely monitor for the presence of drinking water contaminants. Water sample results received on [date] showed that the drinking water provided by your community water system [name] has a fluoride concentration of [insert value] mg/L. This is above the standard, or maximum contaminant level (MCL), of 2.0 mg/L. What should I do? Children under the age of nine should use an alternative source of water that is low in fluoride. You may also want to contact your dentist about proper use by young children of fluoride-containing products. This is not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified immediately. Rather, this is an alert about your drinking water and a cosmetic dental problem that might affect children under nine years of age. At low levels, fluoride can help prevent cavities, but children drinking water containing more than 2 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of fluoride may develop cosmetic discoloration of their permanent teeth (dental fluorosis). Dental fluorosis may result in a brown staining and/or pitting of the permanent teeth. This problem occurs only in developing teeth, before they erupt from the gums. Children under nine should be provided with alternative sources of drinking water or water that has been treated to remove the fluoride to avoid the possibility of staining and pitting of their permanent teeth. You may also want to contact your dentist about proper use by young children of fluoride-containing products. Older children and adults may safely drink the water. Drinking water containing more than 4 mg/L of fluoride can increase your risk of developing bone disease. Although bone disease may develop in anyone exposed to years of drinking water containing more than 4 mg/L of fluoride, dental fluorosis can occur after a relatively short period of exposure (i.e. months) in children under the age of nine. For other health issues concerning the consumption of this water, you may wish to consult your doctor. Some home water treatment units are also available to remove fluoride from drinking water. To learn more about available home water treatment units, you may call the California Department of Health Services Water Treatment Device Unit at (916) or visit the Department’s website at What happened? What is being done? Fluoride contamination is rarely due to human activity. Fluoride occurs naturally in some areas and is found in high concentrations in our source water. [Describe corrective action]. We anticipate resolving the problem within [estimated time frame]. For more information, please call [water system contact name] of [water system name] at [phone number]. Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this public notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail. Secondary Notification Requirements Upon receipt of notification from a person operating a public water system, the following notification must be given within 10 days [Health and Safety Code Section (g)]: SCHOOLS: Must notify school employees, students, and parents (if the students are minors). RESIDENTIAL RENTAL PROPERTY OWNERS OR MANAGERS (including nursing homes and care facilities): Must notify tenants. BUSINESS PROPERTY OWNERS, MANAGERS, OR OPERATORS: Must notify employees of businesses located on the property. This notice is being sent to you by [system]. State Water System ID#: ___________. Date distributed: ___________.

35 Questions? i.WWW.SDCWA.ORGWWW.SDCWA.ORG


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