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Safe Work Practices For Educational Assistants

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1 Safe Work Practices For Educational Assistants
Smart Start Safe Work Practices For Educational Assistants Welcome everyone Introduce yourself and others School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

2 School Boards’ Cooperative Inc.
Introduction SBCI and your school are committed to ensuring the health and safety of all staff. 42% of all lost time injuries in Ontario are due to musculoskeletal disorders (strains and sprains). Musculoskeletal disorders are preventable. The project was a combined effort - OHS, staff, and Work Wellness There was a recognition that the jobs are heavy and the training is to help make the job safer and easier Lost time injury information is from the WSIB “ An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Goals To increase your awareness of health and safety. To explain ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders. To teach you how to work safely. To teach you about your body and how to take care of it. Awareness is the first step. If you don’t know what to look for, it’s hard to be safe Ergonomics are the practices that prevent MSDs. MSDs are injuries of the structures of the skeleton, muscles and supporting or attaching structures. (need to explain here and further in the presentation) Prevention strategies are good, but if you body isn’t well taken care of the strategies will only go so far. Being healthy and strong is one of the best prevention strategies. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Be Aware Pay attention to your surroundings. Work safely. Avoid short cuts. Don’t be complacent. Report problems and hazards. Listen to your body. Consult with the Occupational Therapist (OT) and Physiotherapist (PT) who knows the child you are working with. Paying attention is like turning on your radar or spidey sense Ask if anyone is a type A personality or just impatient. This leads to taking shortcuts. The step you miss might be the one that gets you hurt. Short cuts and complacency happen when we get used to the job. We all experience the “ same ol’, same ol’” at some point. Watch out for it because this is when you miss things because your radar is off. Reporting problems and listening to your body is really about dealing with things when they are small. Discomfort and pain are the body’s warning signals. Don’t ignore them. This means something is wrong. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Be Prepared, Be Safe Don’t rely on someone else or you could end up like these guys. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Hazards EAs are exposed to a number of different hazards. When prepared these hazards are not a problem. When unprepared or surprised a hazard can lead to injury. Luckily the hazards your exposed to don’t require you wearing a hazmat suit. Hazards are bad surprises. The only type of surprises you want are birthday parties and winning lottery tickets. Use example: you’re surprised that something is hot when you touch it You pull away quickly. This itself could cause a muscle strain. Or you might pull away quickly and hit another object, a person, or become unbalanced and fall. When prepared hazards are not a problem. Work Wellness 2010 School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Be Prepared Dress for the occasion Wear comfortable non-slip footwear loafers or running shoes. Wear layered breathable clothing. Wear clothing that fits, but does not restrict your movement. Put out your foot and show your comfortable foot wear. Layers allow for temperature regulation. The body uses energy warming and cooling itself. You won’t be as tired /fatigued if you dress for the environment. You should be able to move easily, but not get clothes caught in anything. Work Wellness 2010 School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Be Prepared Prevent contamination – clean up Wear gloves that: are appropriate for the task, undamaged, and fit well. Discarded after each use. Around food or bathroom activities. Kitchen and bathroom are the first places I clean in my house. The gross factors tells you gloves are required. Gloves like cloths need to fit. They don’t fit you could drop something or be exposed to a hazard. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Be Prepared Check equipment Do you have the right equipment for the job or task. Don’t use broken or malfunctioning equipment. Report broken equipment immediately. Have a plan should you need to perform tasks in an alternate fashion due to equipment failure. Keep projectiles away from students prone to throwing You need the right tool for the job. You wouldn’t use a butter knife to cut something when a saw is what you need. If equipment is broken you can get hurt Have a plan - most clocks are digital, but if they all stopped working most of use can read an analog clock. No one needs a shiner/black eye. It hurts and it’s not attractive. This is one of those bad surprises. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Take a Break Take micro breaks or mini breaks EAs are to receive a 30-minute lunch and two 15-minute breaks, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Do not bank your time. Take your breaks as scheduled so that your body has an opportunity to rest I hear you’re all workaholics ! ! ! I don’t have a 12 step program for you, but I do have 3 pieces of advice 1 – build in different activities. Switching from heavy to light work. Or work that uses one set of muscles to a different set provides a break. 2- take micro or mini breaks. Stand up and stretch your arms overhead. Why don’t you all do that right now. 3 – Take your scheduled breaks and don’t bank the time. Breaks give you time to rest, recharge, and refuel. Keeps you and the kids safe. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Understanding Injury The musculoskeletal system is made up of bone, ligaments, muscles, tendons, nerves, and blood supply. Injuries can occur to back, neck, shoulders, arms, or hands. Injuries can occur to any of these parts at any of these areas. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Point out the structures Skeleton (bones) – are hard and give us structure Ligaments – connect bone to bone and provide stability. If we tear a ligament then the body moves in a way it shouldn’t . Talk about the knee and athletes who tear a lateral ligament. The knee moves sideways. Muscles are what move the body. Tendons connect muscle to bone. Point to the Achilles tendon, or wrist tendons for examples. Mention that they are strong and stringy. Ask if anyone has prepared chicken. Mention the white tough pieces in the meat - this is tendon. If we injury tendon or muscle we have difficulty moving. Nerves send messages to the muscles to make them move. Blood supply carries fuel to the muscles, ligaments, tendons for work and maintenance. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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What Causes Injury? Repetition. Forceful actions. Poor postures and movements – awkward postures. Doing any of these for a long period of time increases the risk of injury. Doing things over and over again without a break or not a long enough break in between. Forceful actions are pushing, pulling, lifting , carrying and actions that require power like hammering. Poor/ awkward postures – The further away from the midline (use your hand to show the midline) you move any body part the poorer or more awkward it is. Also static postures (postures you are in for a long time are awkward) Standing still is considered awkward because your body has to use a great deal of energy to remain in the same position for a long time. Have them bend the right arm at the elbow and extend their left arm in front of them. Ask them t o hold these position while you talk. Explain that the extended arm is more awkward – further away from the body and held static. The longer you do anything the more likely you are to get tired and injured. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Examples Mention that these pictures aren’t being used to embarrass anyone. Most of us forget once and awhile to use good posture, or we don’t even realize we are using bad posture. In the secondary school session an EA saw herself in a picture and said she never realized that she used that particular posture ( it wasn’t a good posture) Talk about the arm position - extended backwards and child holding on so they could get pulled on. Talk about bending at the waist. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Prevention Preventing injury is everyone’s responsibility. It’s up to you to keep you safe. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

16 What Symptoms Should You Watch For?
Discomfort Pain Numbness Tingling Swelling Weakness, Decreased ability to move Cold hands/feet Changes in skin colour Fatigue Symptoms are warning signals. Pay attention to them. Discomfort – over use Pain – injury Numbness, tingling – nerve messages being interrupted Swelling - injury Weakness – nerve messages interrupted or muscle injury Decreased ability to move – injury, unrecognized swelling, interruption of nerve/blood supply Cold hands/feet (make a comment/joke about aside from the usual cold feet you put on your spouse at night) Changes in skin colour – blue is bad (make big eyes, shake your head) it means no blood flow and oxygen. Tissues die without oxygen. Mottled skin (red and white) usually swelling Fatigue – not the type you get because you stayed out too late, but you are tired even after rest and are tired doing tasks that you used to do without a problem School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

17 What To Do If You Have Symptoms?
Report them immediately to your supervisor. Get medical advice and treatment. Work with the joint health and safety committee, your supervisor and co-workers to find the root cause of the problem. Tackle things when they first start and are small Symptoms only tell you there is a problem, not what the problem is. If you are having difficulty, likely someone else is as well. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Body Mechanics The act of maintaining proper position during movement. The body is meant to move. There are good and not so good ways of moving. Anyone going to watch the Olympics? Athletes do amazing things. They have great body mechanics. Ever wonder how power lifters, the guys who lift hundreds of pounds can do that ? It’s not just because they are strong. It’s because they know exactly the right way to move to lift that weight. Now I’m not suggesting you lift weights as heavy as a power lifter, but rather that you focus on good body mechanics to stay safe. Does anyone here go to a gym? Then you know there are mirrors. The mirrors aren’t there so you can admire how great you look. (kiss your bicep or something silly) The mirrors are there so you can watch how your body moves. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

19 What Does Good Posture Like?
Now it’s not very likely the board is going to install mirrors in the school so you can watch your technique, so you’ll have to learn how to feel what good posture is. Have them stand up. Go through good posture. Feet hip width apart; feet, knees and hips in line; knees are loose; slight lumbar curve (talk about core conditioning and that it just means working the abdominals, exaggerate the curve and then have them tilt the pelvis back and flatten the curve out , make a comment about Elvis or dancing); explain the slight curve at the shoulder area but not too far (exaggerate a forward curve and make a comment about looking like the hunchback of Notre Dame and how it’s unattractive) then straighten up and have them relax the shoulders; explain the small neck curve (over exaggerate a forward chin thrust , like a pigeon or chicken) then do a chin tuck; relax and take a deep breath. This is what good posture feels like. You will have to move into other positions, but you want remember to keep this posture in mind. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Straight Back. A straight back has some slight curves that are natural and normal. A straight back is when we preserve the natural curves, and we don’t bend or hunch. Explain that a straight back does not mean ramrod or stick straight, but rather the posture we just experienced. The back has some gentle natural curves. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Avoiding Poor Posture Poor posture is often the result of: Being out of shape and not fit Moving your body incorrectly many times.   You should avoid or minimize: Over reaching and leaning Working overhead Repetitive movements Heavy forceful movements Bending and twisting at the waist Remind them of the core or abdominals necessary to pull in the stomach and keep the lumbar curve small Moving incorrectly and/or the same way all the time is like warping a part of the body. Eventually it gets stuck that way. Bending and twisting – when you were a kid and you wanted to break a twig you would start by bending it (do the bending motion with your hands) and when that didn’t work then you would (pause and then do a twisting motion) twist it. Imagine what that does to your back. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

22 Transferring Principles
Transferring a student should always be considered a heavy task. Create and preserve transfer situations and avoid lifts. Consult with the OT and PT written plan for the student. Most students even small ones are over 40lbs Know how to move each child, what are their particular challenges School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Before The Transfer Assess and know the physical capability of the student. Know your own limits (size and strength). Adjust the heights of furniture and equipment where transfers occur so that they match. Ensure that there is adequate lighting in the environment. Ensure that the transfer distance is as short as possible. Position all chairs etc. close to student. Ensure firm footing. How can the student help? Bigger people typically can lift more, however you need to know what you can and can’t do. Matching heights create a slide. What you don’t see can hurt you. Stick up your foot and show off your good footwear. The floor should be clear of obstacles School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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During the Transfer Use available grab bars, pivot discs, transfer boards or transfer belts as prescribed by the OT and PT. Ensure good communication between staff during a transfer. Verbalize the transfer process to the student and begin when the student is ready. Show the assistive devices and name them. The EAs can request these and get training on their use. Talk to the student School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

25 During the Transfer con’t
Bend your knees, use your legs, and keep your back straight when transferring. Agree on timing count or use queuing signals with students and/or staff assisting. Avoid rushing. Avoid stooping, bending or twisting at the waist Move your feet. Demonstrate the movement while you talk. Is the timing 1,2,3, and lift or 1,2,3, lift….we’ve all been there arguing about which one it is. (be goofy when you say this) Remember the twig example Actually exaggerate moving your feet. “It’s amazing…see how they work.” Things to point out in the picture: Working together Coordinated Notice the bent knees, they are making use of their legs School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

26 Transfer To and From Chair to Toilet/Table/Plinth
Apply good transfer principles. Prepare the area (raise toilet lid, secure grab bars, clear table). Lock wheels on the chair. Move or remove arms/trays. Use your legs, bend your knees, and keep your back straight. Get close to the student. Use the information we just spoke about Comment on how if someone forgets to do this, you’d like to believe they’ll put the student back down, but you’ll not think about it and twist yourself into some weird position to lift the seat up. Show the exaggerated movement of holding a student and lifting a toilet seat. Locking wheels seems like common sense…but I get this looney tunes cartoon in my head of some student rolling across the room while you run after them. Funny in the cartoon, not so funny in real life. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

27 Transfer to and from Floor to Chair
Determine if this is a two person transfer.  Ensure the floor environment is secure and free from obstacles. Provide padding/mats. Lock wheels on the chair. Use your legs. Get the student to use the chair to assist in raising and lowering. Coordinate your efforts. Proceed in stages (floor to kneeling to standing, then pivot and sit). Should be two people Proceeding in stages means you need to not rush. Step…step…step Using your legs – ask them to think about how much they weigh, and say “no they don’t have to tell anyone”. Now if their legs can carry around that much weight they must be fairly strong. Let’s use them. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Things to point out Wheels are locked Student is helping Step by step process Two person transfer School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Lifting Principles Plan ahead and practice lifting and carrying Get a grip Keep all loads close to the body Use your legs and keep your back straight Move your feet and avoid twisting Cradle loads and bring close to body The body needs to practice to create a memory for how to do things If you can’t get a firm grasp on the load you could drop it. Explain that if a load is far away gravity acts downward on the load pulling you forward. If the load is close gravity acts downward in close alignment with the body and you don’t move. Demonstrate movement, use of legs, moving feet, and cradling loads Have them stand up and demonstrate. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Back Facts 80% of all back pain is musculoskeletal The more fit you are, the less likely you are to have a back or neck complaint. Most of the time low back pain is not related to a specific event Most low back pain is caused by repetitive stress to muscle and ligaments This means it is preventable and often can be fixed Most adults will experience back pain in their life time. Participating in normal activities is the best course of action. Make a joke about no lazing around in bed. Back pain usually builds up over time. People will say I threw my back out. (you can make a comment about how funny this is) It isn’t one big lift that usually hurts your back. You wear it out by lifting poorly and often. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Remember Lifting heavy loads increases the risk of back injury. Don’t lift anything that is too heavy – be sure you are comfortable with the lift. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

32 Lifting Small Children
Have the student help. Ensure the student is calm. Crouch down to the level of the student. Get close to the student. Hold on to the student. Things to point out about the picture: -Not a great lift, but it was difficult as child was running around. Has a good grip on the child Supporting weight under the bum Neck is twisted Child not holding on tightly Has books in hands School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Remember The more often you lift and the greater the weight the more likely you are to injure your back, shoulders and hands. Minimize lifting and/or use mechanical lifts whenever possible. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

34 Lifting from Chair to Change Table
Use mechanical lifts Ensure that all straps are properly fastened Guide, don’t push and pull Pushing and pulling heavy loads can injure the shoulders and arms Lifts move with relative ease, pushing and pulling too much can force you to have to stop a quickly moving weight thus hurting the shoulders and arms. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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I thought this was a happy picture. Although her arm is extended it’s just for stabilizing for a moment. Everything is ready to go. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Things to point out about the picture: Good guiding is occurring Holding on to leg to prevent being kicked Relatively close to client School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

37 Lifting from Floor to Chair
The greater the difference between lifting levels the greater the risk. Always work with a partner. A mechanical lift should be your first choice. Get close to the student You want to avoid this lift if you can. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Partner Lifting Make sure that you communicate Make sure partner(s) understand their role(s) Use good lift techniques Balance the load between the lifters Adjust the load for lifters who are different heights Stand with feet shoulder width apart Lift at the same time in preparation for lifting the load Push up with your legs keeping the head and shoulders straight as the lift begins Time or count when lifting Know who is doing what. If the load is unbalanced you risk dropping the load. Ask them: when something starts to fall, what do you do? Answer is try to stop it or grab it. When we do that we often hurt ourselves. Pick someone who is a different size than you from the audience. Pretend to do a lift with them and ask who will be doing more lifting and who is more at risk for injury. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Things to point out about the picture: -There is bending and leaning -Not all movements can be avoided -Good part is the golfer’s lift – opposite leg up from arm side that is going downward. Demonstrate golfer’s move. And have them stand and do it as well. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

40 Pushing and Pulling Wheelchairs
Ensure that the student is secure before you begin moving. Remove any obstacles from your path. Prop open doors or get help opening the doors. Release brakes. Protect shoulders wrists and arms. If the student starts to fall out, you heroes will try to save them. I’m glad you’re so dedicated, but we also want you say, so strap them in. You could injury your shoulders and arms trying to push against a static object. Demonstrate good arm hand position: Shoulders relaxed Elbows at 90 degrees Power grip on any handles. No overreaching or extending, School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

41 Pushing and Pulling Wheelchairs
Stay close to the chair to avoid over reaching. Proceed at a slow and steady pace. Check wheels for debris. Pull only when necessary. Get help Make pushing easier Make sure there is adequate clearance as you go through doorways Just like shopping carts if debris gets in the wheels it won’t roll right. We all know how much we hate that. If the travel area is difficult to navigate get some help with doors, debris and other students. Try taking a wheelchair through a travel path empty to find the difficult spots and correct for them. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

42 Manual Guiding - Ambulatory Students
Stay close to the student. Proceed at a moderate pace. Look ahead for hazards. Make sure the student is wearing proper footwear. For students who pull or jump avoid attempts to restrain them unless there is a risk of harm to the student. Use your whole body when guiding, and place your hand on the student’s back. If you are close you can direct with touch as well Watch out for them and you. Socks are slippery and good footwear protects the foot. When dancing slight pressure on the back guides the partner, same idea as what men would do when out with women and ushering them through the door first. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

43 Manual Guiding- Non-Ambulatory Self-Propelled Students
Ensure that there are no obstacles in the travel path. Understand how the wheel chair or assistive device works. Be aware of hallway traffic. Use the automatic door openers if available. Use verbal directives to assist the student to safely maneuver through hallways, doorways etc. Get help if necessary to avoid getting stuck and get help if stuck. Where are the handles, brakes, etc. Who’s in the hall, when is the best time to travel. You are the student’s early warning system. If they are stuck, get help, don’t get hurt. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

44 Manual Guiding on the Stairs
When accompanying someone up and down stairs ensure that they use the handrail or wall. Stairs are tricky. If you can avoid them with challenging students. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Feeding Prepare the student for their meal. Use a non slip surface to prevent dishes from sliding. Prepare utensils and equipment ahead of time, and ensure that they are fastened/placed correctly. Wash your hands and wear gloves. Ensure that you have a comfortable seat that allows you to be at the same level as the student when feeding. Check the food temperatures for safety. Things to note in the picture -Tray is prepared -Student is wearing something to protect clothing School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Feeding Get close to the student. Place the meal so that the person can reach it. Give the student verbal or visual cues. Feed students slowly and give them small bites to prevent choking. Use utensils as much as possible. Clean all equipment and store properly. Things to point out in the picture EA is at the level of the student EA is sitting close to the student EA is wearing gloves Use utensils and don’t get bitten School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Hygiene Educational Assistants can often be exposed to biological and chemical hazards. Biological Hazards include blood or other body fluids, fungi, bacteria and viruses, and fecal matter. Chemical Hazards include cleaning products, solvents, gases and flammable materials like gasoline and solvents. Although I was joking about the hazmat suit earlier, I am serious about avoiding biological and chemical hazards. Common substances can be harmful, so stay aware. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Hygiene – Staying Safe Cover up (gloves, shoes, sleeves) Disinfect bathroom and eating areas Clean up and discard Wash with antibacterial soap Clean handles Do not use unlabelled substances and never mix substances Work in a well ventilated areas and use available fans Read the instructions If you know what you are dealing with you can handle it appropriately. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

49 Hygiene – I’ve been exposed!
Skin Punctured – cut or bitten while at work Clean the wound thoroughly and cover to prevent infection. Consult an health professional. Suspect you were exposed to a contagion or toxic substance. Consult a health professional immediately. Report all incidents to your supervisor. Accident’s unfortunately can still happen even when we are careful. Take care of injuries or exposures (real or potential) right away. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Physical Therapy Consult with the OT and/or PT and use the written plan. Make sure you understand what therapy you are providing and how to provide it safely. If transferring or lifting follow safe principles. Prepare floor mats, therapy bed or plinth. It’s difficult to do what you don’t understand Be prepared. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Passive Therapy Give clear instructions to the student before proceeding. Avoid putting your wrists in an awkward position. Ensure that you are secure on the table/plinth. Maintain your balance. Do not tug on the student. Use your legs and body when exerting force. Demonstrate good wrist position. Show flexion and extension. Point to picture and show straight position of wrists Talk about how the EA is in the middle of the plinth Legs and body have more weight. Wrists and upper body are smaller and not as strong if you have to move a student or students leg. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Active Therapy Provide instruction. Demonstrate for clarity. Ensure environment is safe. Make sure the student knows what they are expected to do. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Field Trips Field trips complicate safety because the environment is often uncontrolled. You can increase safety by planning ahead and knowing what to do on the trip. Think like a boy scout or girl guide. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

54 Field Trips – Planning Ahead
Transportation Conditions Prepare the student Supplies (medicines, change of clothes, medical information, etc.) Check equipment Check the weather Maps and directions. Emergency plan and numbers Know the location (washrooms, exits, ramps, stairs, elevators and phone) It’s good to keep a checklist to make sure you’ve covered all the bases. Pilots, nurses and many other professionals that are responsible for people’s lives use checklists. You should do the same. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

55 Field Trips – On the Trip
Be aware Scout ahead Be patient Follow safety rules when onsite Don’t forget good hygiene practices Participate only in activities that are appropriate for the student Ask for help Don’t leave a student unattended Patience is your ally on a field trip. When we hurry we often forget to do the right thing. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

56 Dressing/Undressing Principles
Ensure all necessary items are available. Always get to the level of the student. Ensure the student is calm. Talk to the student and tell them are doing as you proceed. For small children sit or crouch behind them and reach forward to dress them. For larger students you will likely have to move around them. If you are at the same level there is less reaching, and bending. Sit with small students School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

57 Pull Over Sweaters/Tops
Dressing Bunch sweater like panty hose and place over student’s head. Do the same for each sleeve and get each hand through the sleeve. Straighten sleeves and then straighten sweater down the body. If the student is in a wheelchair, have them lean forward if possible and work the sweater down the back side first and then straighten the front Undressing Remove one sleeve at a time. Bunch material toward head and remove all at once. Go through each point and use actions to pretend you are doing this. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

58 Coats and Front Opening Sweaters
Dressing Put on one sleeve and slide coat around the back. Then put on the second sleeve and zip or button the front Undressing Ensure all gloves and mittens are removed first. Unfasten the garment. Remove one sleeve. Slide around back.  Remove other sleeve. Go through each point and pretend you are doing this. Have them pair up and put on each other’s coat or sweater. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Shoes and Boots Undressing Loosen fastenings. Begin removal from the heel. Slide footwear off. Dressing Do not place yourself directly in front of the student. Straighten socks Slide footwear over the toes and hold. With the other hand take the back of the footwear and pull over the heel. Point to picture and indicate how the EA is holding the student’s leg to prevent being kicked. Apparently an EA in the Niagara Board suffered a kick to the head from a student. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

60 School Boards’ Cooperative Inc.
Remember Let students do as much as they can. Not only does it promote independence it also makes your workload lighter. We get impatient and do for the students what they can do for themselves. Work on your patience and let the student work on being independent. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

61 Avoiding Conflicts with Students
Avoiding Conflicts with students involves prevention strategies, de-escalation and personal safety. Remember - physical intervention/ involvement of any kind is always the absolute last resort, and never use any form of restraint unless imminent danger exists and no other options are available. This is just a refresher on non-violent crises intervention. You’ll probably remember most of it from the course you’ve taken. If you can avoid a conflict situation you can also help avoid physical injury. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

62 Prevention Strategies
Organize the workspace PPE Watch for weapons Know the volatile students Know where and how to access help (911) Be aware of student conflicts, tendencies and personalities Know your students’ risk factors, and triggers Create protective factors and avoid conflict School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

63 De-Escalation – Non-Verbal Techniques
maintain a calm, caring, professional attitude; use the Safe, Supportive Stance; use a non-confrontational tone; present a relaxed, non-confrontational body language; don't take anger/behaviour personally note the subject's body language; avoid showing anger or outrage or fear This is about keeping your cool. Practicing relaxation techniques and then utilizing them can help you remain calm during a tense situation. Deep breathing and counting to ten. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

64 De-Escalation – Verbal Techniques
allow/accept venting do not vent yourself listen to what is being said make it clear that you hear concerns state your concerns clearly and calmly do not give ultimatums state reasonable limits try to avoid confrontational statements On some occasions, it is best to say and do nothing! Practice listening and practice talking. Develop some statements you can use in conflict situations. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Personal Safety use the safe, supportive stance; remove the target if possible; remove the audience; know about and use personal protective equipment take training to learn further strategies on prevention, de-escalation and personal safety Your safety is important too. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Desk Work Do not sit on child-sized chairs. Sit close to students. Use a small stool or height adjustable chair for low surfaces. Avoid standing and bending at the waist. Limit your time, in any one posture. When kneeling make sure that there is padding under the knees. Child sized chairs can break under adult weight Sitting close allows you to minimize bad postures and see the work better Variety is the spice of life and a variety of postures is the way to stay safe School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Desk Work Alternate the side on which you sit. Alternating sides and leaning versus upright posture alleviates stress on any one area of the body. When you stand up at the end of a teaching session, stretch your arms overhead. If you sit for a long period of time consider using a pillow or back support for you lumbar spine. Have them stand up and stretch Make a comment about this being the 7th inning stretch the course is almost finished. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Things to point out in the pictures: -twisted position and arm extended backwards -second picture not too bad, slight stoop but body is meant to move -lots of room for movement School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Things to point out in the pictures: Bent over Too far away from desk Second picture is excellent EA is crouching with no bending or excessive reaching Good neck and back position EA is at same level as student Able to teach and direct easily School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Computer Work Quickly talk about how to get into this position. You don’t have a lot of time so you need to take them through it. Feet flat on the floor or supported with a footrest if you need to raise the chair to type The knee, hip and elbow angles should all be at least 90 degrees. If they are less it is like crimping a hose. When you bend a hose you cut off the water supply. Joint angles less than 90 cut off blood flow. Raise the chair to help get these angles, and raise and lower the keyboard height as well to get these angles Make sure the keyboard and monitor are lined up in front of you. The wrists should be flat (demonstrate) and the monitor arms length away. Your chin should be in the middle of the screen. The eyes have a greater range of motion down than up. If your neck bends forward raise the monitor. Have someone look at you if you can’t seem to achieve this posture, or you don’t know if it looks right. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Slips, Trips, Falls One of the most common ways of becoming injured. Slips and trips lead to falls. Make a joke about the picture. Tripping over the health and safety officer. Just proves people can be hazards too. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Slips Slips happen when there is too little traction between the footwear and the floor, such as: wet, waxed or oily floors, loose mats or carpets, improper footwear (slippery soles, heels), weather hazards, accidental spills. Show off your footwear again. Make a joke about it. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Trips Trips happen when your foot hits something that causes you to lose your balance. Trips are caused by: poor lighting, unsecured cables or cords, uneven surfaces, clutter, obstructed view, open drawers, and objects in your way. Make a comment about the cables on the floor and the fact that someone was looking out for you. Make a funny comment about how it would have looked bad to have the trainer fall. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

74 Preventing Slips, Trips, Falls
Good Housekeeping Appropriate Footwear Appropriate Pace Good housekeeping is prevention Report and correct slips and debris Mark areas and keep them clear Secure mats Close drawers and cupboards – this isn’t the 3 stooges comedy routine Report broken lights Stick out your foot and say: do I need to say it again Walk slower on rough or uneven terrain Point toes outward – you are more likely to kick something than trip Wide turns allow you to see what’s coming You need to see, so check lighting and make sure anything you carry doesn’t get in your way. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Stairs Avoid carrying objects up and down stairs whenever possible. Make use of the handrail or wall for balance. Maintain a steady pace. Go with the flow. You want to look like the first picture, not the second. Talk through the points and mention that usually people go up one side of the stairs and down the other. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

76 Body Basics – Taking Care of You
Get Plenty of Rest (8 hours a day) Fatigue increases the risk of injury Fuel-up Food is fuel Exercise Regularly Stay strong If you are tired you are more likely to get hurt and you have less energy for work. We can catch up on sleep, but we can’t bank it. I like to think of food as fuel, so the question is why wouldn’t you give that race car of yours premium. Premium is food that focuses on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Eat less and more frequently to keep the fuel level consistent We’re all a bit different so if you need help consult an expert Exercise – remember people view this as work keep it achievable Your job is physical, but you need exercise that balances off what you do at work. You also need exercise to relieve stress. Cardiovascular – doesn’t need to be complicated, walk, swim, dance. Pick something you’ll enjoy. 3 times a week Strengthening – can be weights or weight bearing exercises (push ups, squats) 2-3 times a week Stretching – do it during the day, stretch your neck and shoulders in the shower, do it in front of the television. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Stretches Do the stretches with them. First have them take a deep breath. Have them hold stretches for 15 seconds. Check your deodorant stretch. Tight ass stretch. This will get a few laughs. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010

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Thank You Thank them for their attention and take any last questions. School Boards’ Cooperative Inc. Work Wellness 2010


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