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Reconstruction and the South. Lincoln’s Assassination: Friday, April 14 th, 1865. Lincoln shot by John Wilkes Booth in back of the head. Booth said; “sic.

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Presentation on theme: "Reconstruction and the South. Lincoln’s Assassination: Friday, April 14 th, 1865. Lincoln shot by John Wilkes Booth in back of the head. Booth said; “sic."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reconstruction and the South

2 Lincoln’s Assassination: Friday, April 14 th, Lincoln shot by John Wilkes Booth in back of the head. Booth said; “sic semper tyrannis” (The South shall live) Booth caught 12 days later near a barn in Maryland and shot. Conspiracy plot involving 8 others and attacks or planned attack on other cabinet members of Lincoln’s was revealed.

3 Ford Theatre

4 Lincoln’s funeral procession:

5 Funeral Train route…

6 Consequences of the Civil War The nation as a whole is viewed as more important than individual states. The Federal Government expanded. Tremendous growth in industry. The South needed to be rebuilt physically, politically, and emotionally. -railroads, bridges, etc… needed to be fixed. -slaves were now, “freemen”. -disease, hunger, grief.

7 Find evidence to support each statement 1.Lincoln supported a Reconstruction plan based on amnesty and forgiveness. 1.Andrew Johnson proved to be a difficult president for Congress to work with. 1.Republicans in Congress disagreed on the approach and execution of Reconstruction.

8 The Black Codes: Legislation in southern states that aimed to restrain black freedom. examples: -could not bear arms -forced labor contracts -restrictions on type of employment These codes varied state to state. They also can be seen as attempts to circumvent the 13 th amendment.

9 Effects of the Black Codes: 1. Congress passed a bill expanding the Freedmen’s Bureau. -Johnson vetoed it. 2.Congress passed a Civil Rights Act, assisting in the enforcement of the 13 th amendment. -Johnson vetoed it.

10 Continued… These were considered Radical reforms. Johnson was stubborn, and also did not want to alienate his Southern ties politically. However his vetoes only pushed more moderates toward the radical cause. END RESULT: April 9, 1866: 2/3 majority in Congress overides Johnson’s veto. First time in U.S. history when this happened for a major piece of legislation.

11 Andrew Johnson, Kicking the Freedman’s Bureau

12 Johnson’s vetoes and impeachment: Johnson defended his vetoes on constitutional grounds; however, his personal beliefs regarding slavery (such as that the true evil of slavery was the harm it did to poor whites, not to enslaved blacks) were the true basis for his vetoes. Congress then moved to limit Johnson’s power through the Tenure of Office Act, which required that Johnson obtain the consent of the Senate before removing any appointed official that the Senate had previously approved. Johnson disobeys by firing Edwin Stanton, is impeached.

13 Radical Reconstruction Moderate and radical republicans now united against Johnson. U.S. Grant (Republican) easily wins election of 1868

14 THOUGHT ON RADICAL RECONSTRUCTION… “In order to ensure new freedoms for all men, it may be necessary to restrain old freedoms for some men.”

15 Radical Reconstruction legislation: 14 th Amendment: - clearly defined citizenship to include freedmen. -attempted to prevent discriminatory legislation. -reduced a state’s congressional representation if it denied black vote. -barred Confederate officials to hold office (unless gain a 2/3 congressional majority) -renounced Confederate debt.

16 Continued… Reconstruction Acts -broke the former Confederacy into 5 military districts to enforce new laws. -required military to register voters and supervise election process. -dealt with the creation of new state constitutions in the South.

17 Continued… 15 TH Amendment -forbade states to deny anyone the right to vote “on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” *U.S. Grant, the now president applauded the new amendment.

18 What made these so radical? 14 th amendment 15 th amendment Reconstruction Acts

19 Problems with Radical Reconstruction Still no common view of racial equality, even in the North. Many Northern states (including PA) rejected bills that would have granted black voting rights from Radicals were calling for “extra” rights for freedmen in the form of protection by the federal government to ensure adherence to laws.

20 THOUGHT ON RADICAL RECONSTRUCTION… “In order to ensure new freedoms for all men, it may be necessary to restrain old freedoms for some men.”


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