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Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques.

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Presentation on theme: "Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques."— Presentation transcript:

1 Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 Annual Staff Recertification Rev July 2009 TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

2 1. Edward and his family immigrated from Eastern Europe, where they lived in a refugee camp for several years. He is usually friendly but quiet, speaks broken English, and is often picked on by others. Today, he gets into a shoving match with one of the school bullies. When staff try to physically separate the two, Edward begins struggling wildly. He breaks free and runs off, bouncing off lockers and doors, eventually hiding in the boys’ room. What would you do? a. How would you assess this situation? Immediately dangerous or not? Deliberate or Emotional? b. What would you do to intervene, based on TACT-2?

3 2. Antoine is a smaller, younger smart- mouthed resident of a group home for youthful offenders. He often antagonizes William, though only when staff are around to protect him. Today, he begins teasing: “So William, my brother says he’s gone out with your little sister, Janel. Isn’t that her name? Janel? And HE says she is FINE!” William is getting more and more upset as Antoine continues his story. What would you do? a. How would you assess this situation? Immediately dangerous or not? Deliberate or Emotional? b. What would you do to intervene, based on TACT-2?

4 3. Ten minutes later, William is furious. “I know I’m supposed to be going home for good in 3 weeks, but I tell you what, I’m about to bust him in mouth anyway! He only talks trash like that cuz you’re there to protect him -- see what happens later when there’s no staff around! And I’m not the ONLY one who wants to teach him a lesson! Just watch!” What would you do? a. How would you assess this situation? Immediately dangerous or not? Deliberate or Emotional? b. What would you do to intervene, based on TACT-2?

5 Immediately Dangerous? Not Immediately Dangerous? TACT-2 MODEL DeliberateEmotional Crisis Response 1. Redirect2. Remove3. Restrict4. Restrain

6 Peers Outside Issues Expression Behavior DeliberateEmotional Deliberate Emotional Approval None Calm Usual Disapproval Significant Intense Unusual

7 Immediately Dangerous? CORRECTION 1.Reminder 2.Warning 3.Confrontation Not Immediately Dangerous? COUNSELING 1.Give space 2.Listen actively 3.Problem Solving TACT-2 MODEL DeliberateEmotional Crisis Response 1. Redirect2. Remove3. Restrict4. Restrain

8 Understanding Deliberate Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

9 What is Deliberate Misbehavior? “Purposeful attempt to meet one’s own needs at the expense of others.” TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

10 Glasser’s Social Needs Love Belonging Power Importance Freedom Choice Fun Pleasure

11 Negative Needs Fulfilling Behaviors Belonging Class clown, neediness, giving into peer pressure Importance Defying authority, breaking rules, intimidating others Fun Teasing others, vandalism, thrill seeking activities Freedom Refusal to work, running away, using drugs or alcohol

12 Positive Needs-Fulfilling Behaviors Belonging Mentor relationships Social activities Sports teams Importance Group leadership Community service Helping younger kids Fun Games & puzzles Music & dancing Community trips Freedom Allowing choice in clothing, chores, etc. Journaling, art, poetry, etc.

13 Which Needs Are Met? Which need(s) are met by each of the following misbehaviors? And what alternative prosocial options we could offer to meet the same need in a more socially appropriate way? 1. Spray painting gang logos on school wall.

14 Which Needs Are Met? Which need(s) are met by each of the following misbehaviors? And what alternative prosocial options we could offer to meet the same need in a more socially appropriate way? 2. Playing two boyfriends off against each other.

15 Deliberate example: Later that same day, you overhear Antoine antagonizing William again while the larger boy is flipping through a magazine. “So Trey, did I hear that YOU dated William’s sister too? Is she as hot as my brother says she is? Or is she a dog? Cuz I’ve seen the family picture William keeps in his room, and there’s definitely a bit of cocker spaniel in her, if you ask me!” William lunges out of his seat, chasing Antoine around the room. Antoine is giggling foolishly as he ducks behind a staff member, crying “Restrain him! Restrain him!” The other youth are literally rolling on the floor laughing. Which cues of deliberate behavior are seen here? Which social needs are met by Antoine’s behavior?

16 Understanding Emotional Crisis TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

17 What is Emotional Crisis? “Impulsive reaction to overwhelming stress or misperceptions.” TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

18 Irrational Beliefs Low Self-Esteem Irrational Beliefs Low Self-Esteem Stressful Problem Thoughts Feelings Impulsive Behavior Conflict Cycle Based on a model created by Nicholas Long, Ph.D. Negative Consequences

19 Understanding Stressors Some stress is external (getting pushed around) and some is internal (worrying about being popular). Youth become overwhelmed by their emotions and act impulsively, bringing consequences on themselves. 1. What internal or external stresses might youth experience from home that affect their behavior in school or in a residential setting? 2. What internal or external stresses might youth experience from within the school or program that might affect their behavior?

20 Emotional example: Twenty minutes after the incident in the hallway, Edward is sitting in the school counselor’s office, trying to explain what happened. His eyes are red and puffy, and he has a faraway look on his normally friendly face. Which cues of emotional crisis are seen here? What stresses might Edward be experiencing? “It was a rough night at home. My father lost his job at the warehouse this week, and he’s worried that we’ll all be deported if he doesn’t find work soon. My little sister woke up screaming again, and kept us all up for hours. And then pushes me into the lockers for no reason at all. And everyone else is laughing too. I just had enough! I don’t know....”

21 Skills for Handling Emotional Crisis TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

22 Counseling response Use when problem behavior is the result of OVERWHELMING EMOTIONAL STRESS

23 Escalation Model 1. Warning 2. Escalation 3. Crisis 4. Resolution

24 Tasks During Crisis 1. Warning 2. Escalation 3. Crisis 4. Resolution PREVENT DE-ESCALATE Promote LEARNING SAFETY

25 Problem Solving Active Listening Give Space 4. Resolution Phase 1. Warning Phase 2. Escalation Phase TensionTension

26 Giving Space 1. PHYSICALLY SAFE, but 2. TOO UPSET to talk rationally. Give time and space when a youth is: Use a calm tone and non-threatening body language. Acknowledge feelings, offer time to calm down, set limits, and monitor the youth.

27 Giving Space example: Staff hold William back as Antoine steps out of the room, barking and yipping several times on the way out. William looks about ready to explode, so you decide to give him a moment to calm down before trying to work through the problem with him. What could you say to William to give him space? “William, it looks like you’re pretty UPSET RIGHT NOW. Why don’t you TAKE A COUPLE OF MINUTES TO YOURSELF IN THE KITCHEN and when you’re ready, we’ll talk.” “William, it looks like you’re pretty ______________. Why don’t you ____________ _________________________________________ and when you’re ready, we’ll talk.”

28 Active Listening 1. CALM ENOUGH to talk, but 2. TOO UPSET to problem solve. Use active listening when a youth is: First, be attentive and encourage the youth to vent. Do not take sides, or engage in premature problem solving. Instead, reflect or paraphrase the youth’s feelings and reasons. Ask non-threatening, open-ended questions to get more information.

29 Active Listening example: After calming down a little, William begins talking in a miserable voice: “All I wanna do is get home to my family. I don’t wanna cause any more problems or get into any fights. Why can’t you guys just do your jobs and shut him up so that I can go home on time?” What could you say to reflect William’s statement? SURFACE REFLECTION: “It sounds like you’re upset because staff haven’t done enough to stop Antoine from messing with you.” DEEPER REFLECTION: “I can see how badly you want to get home… and right now you’re worried that you might lose your temper and mess that up somehow.”

30 Problem Solving 1. CALM ENOUGH to talk, and 2. READY to problem solve. Use Therapeutic Problem Solving when a youth is: Begin with the “therapeutic” steps by using active listening skills to explore the youth’s side of what happened. LISTEN, EMPATHIZE and SUMMARIZE their point of view. Then move into “problem solving” steps by helping the youth see other options and resolve the situation. SUGGEST new perspectives, explore OPTIONS, then create a NEW PLAN.

31 Skills for Managing Deliberate Problems TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

32 Corrective response Use when aggressive behavior is the result of INTENTIONAL DELIBERATE CHOICES

33 RemindersReminders Use “Friendly Reminders” to verbally or non-verbally recall a rule or expectation without putting youth on the spot.

34 Friendly Reminder Later that same day, you see Antoine sitting in the TV room when William enters. Antoine begins to whimper and whine like a dog, drawing giggles from his peers. What are some VERBAL or NON-VERBAL reminders you could use to redirect Antoine’s behavior?

35 WarningsWarnings Use “Fair Warnings” to privately caution about consequences which will occur if youth does not comply with rules.

36 Three Types of Consequences a. NATURAL CONSEQUENCES b. LOGICAL CONSEQUENCES c. PUNITIVE CONSEQUENCES Student drops lunch on floor and walks away from mess: √ Natural Consequences of this behavior? √ Logical Consequences of this behavior? √ Punitive Consequences of this behavior?

37 Fair Warning Five minutes later, a dog food commercial comes on the TV. In an innocent voice, Antoine asks, “Excuse me William. Just curious: What IS your sister’s favorite food anyway?” LIST ONE NATURAL AND ONE LOGICAL CONSEQUENCE. NATURAL CONSEQUENCE: Upset William. Might get into a fight. LOGICAL CONSEQUENCE: Might have to leave the room. TV might get turned off.

38 ConfrontationConfrontation Use “Firm Confrontations” to directly address a serious problem behavior in a calm, professional manner.

39 Firm Confrontation Antoine ignores your warning. He drops to his hands and knees, snuffling around the floor like a hound dog searching for a treat. “Kibbles and Bits! Kibbles and Bits! I want my BACON!” he growls, getting more excited as he approaches William. The larger boy’s face is beet red, and you can see he is about to explode. You take Antoine into the hall for a private confrontation. Write a FIRM CONFRONTATION. 1. Misbehavior: “Antoine, you’re still teasing, even though I told you to stop.” 2. Effects: “It’s demeaning, and just plain wrong.” 3. Consequences: “I want you to leave the TV room right now and go to your room until we have time to talk more about this. I’ll be down at lunch to discuss this further with you.”

40 Recognizing Adult Anger Traps TACT-2 Therapeutic Aggression Control Techniques

41 ADULT ANGER TRAP #1 OUTSIDE STRESS Leftover stress from other home or work problems… makes it easy to overreact angrily to a minor situation.

42 ADULT ANGER TRAP #2 EMBARRASSMENT We feel helpless or inadequate trying to manage a challenging situation… then turn embarrassment to anger.

43 ADULT ANGER TRAP #3 FEAR We feel a natural shock or fear in response to a threatening situation… then turn anxiety into anger.

44 ADULT ANGER TRAP #4 VALUES VIOLATION A core value is violated by a resident’s behavior, sparking feelings of righteous anger. VALUES VIOLATION

45 ADULT ANGER TRAP #5 AUTHORITY CHALLENGE We engage in an angry power struggle to establish dominance over a defiant resident.

46 Anger Trap example Later that week, Edward has another emotional incident, this one triggered by a movie about the Jewish holocaust. Shortly after it began, Edward asked to leave the class to use the bathroom, but the teacher denied him a hall pass. Edward left anyway, shoving the teacher out of the way, and ended up doing in-school suspension. Later, the teacher says: “Honestly, I didn’t know WHAT to do. It was scary: he was trembling all over, and I could see that he was freaking out. I’ve never had any training to deal with PTSD! And I didn’t want it to look like I couldn’t control my classroom, so I kept insisting that he stay in his seat and put his head down. It had already been a very long day, and I guess I wasn’t thinking clearly. I feel like such an idiot for putting that movie on in the first place. That poor boy....” What Anger Traps did this staff fall into?

47 25-item multiple choice test Prepare for TACT-2

48 Immediately Dangerous? CORRECTION 1.Reminder 2.Warning 3.Confrontation Not Immediately Dangerous? COUNSELING 1.Give space 2.Listen actively 3.Problem Solving TACT-2 MODEL Reviewing TACT-2 MODEL DeliberateEmotional Crisis Response 1. Redirect2. Remove3. Restrict4. Restrain


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