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| | Tel: 020 7920 9500 | | Computer Training & Personal Development Project Management Training: Understanding.

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Presentation on theme: "| | Tel: 020 7920 9500 | | Computer Training & Personal Development Project Management Training: Understanding."— Presentation transcript:

1 | | Tel: | | Computer Training & Personal Development Project Management Training: Understanding Project Management

2 Agenda: Day One 8:30-8:45Icebreaker: This is Me! 8:45-9:00Session One: Course Overview 9:00-9:15Session Two: What is a Project? 9:15-9:30Session Three: Project Management Basics 9:30-9:45Session Four: Pre-Assignment Review 9:45-10:45Session Five: How Can Projects Help Me? 10:45-11:30Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle 11:30-11:50Session Seven: Selling a Project 11:50-12:00Morning Wrap-Up 12:00-1:00Lunch 1:00-1:15Energizer: Alien Architect 1:15-1:45Session Eight: Preparing Your Project 1:45-2:30Session Nine: The Role of a Project Manager 2:30-2:45Break 2:45-3:00Session Ten: Project Goals 3:00-4:15Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project 4:15-4:30Day One Wrap-Up

3 Session One: Course Overview Understand what is meant by a project. Recognize what steps must be taken to complete projects on time and on budget. Have a better ability to sell ideas and make presentations. Know simple techniques and tools for planning and tracking your project. Have methods for keeping the team focused and motivated. Learning Objectives

4 Session Two: What is a Project? (I) If we understand what projects are, hopefully we will be more successful. We must understand that projects differ from other kinds of work. What are some ways in which projects differ from other kinds of work? What are some words that might describe what a project is or isn’t?

5 Session Two: What is a Project? (II) A unique venture that has a start and an end, and that is conducted by people to meet established goals within parameters of cost, schedule, and quality. A unique venture that has a start and an end, with its own budget, to meet established goals within parameters of cost, schedule, and quality.

6 Session Three: Project Management Basics (I) What is project management? A set of tools, techniques, and knowledge. The application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to a broad range of activities.

7 Session Three: Project Management Basics (II) Resources Materials Technology Staff Funding Management

8 Session Three: Project Management Basics (III) Project Management InitiatingPlanning ExecutingClosing Controlling

9 Session Four: Pre-Assignment Review (I) Presentation Checklist Background information about your company or organization Name of your project Why you are doing it (the purpose) Who will be involved Whether this is a project you have asked to do or if it has been assigned to you

10 Session Four: Pre-Assignment Review (II) Presentation Checklist ctd. How it will benefit you, your department, a specific group of individuals, or your organization as a whole How much time you expect it to take Whether you have identified any costs or not What planning and tracking tools you will use

11 Session Four: Pre-Assignment Review (III) Eight Project Categories Scope Time Money Quality Communication Human Resources Contracts Risk

12 Session Five: How Can Projects Help Me? Types of projects: – Those that have been assigned to you – Those you want to take on It is vital to set the stage by identifying benefits of a project. The Benefits of Projects (I)

13 Session Five: How Can Projects Help Me? What is the advantage to taking on an extra project? Builds a relationship with your boss Could establish your reputation within the department or company Learn new skills/showcase skills More opportunities to network The Benefits of Projects (II)

14 Session Five: How Can Projects Help Me? Sometimes we feel overwhelmed by the thought of taking on one more project and we feel like we are sinking. What do you do when that happens? The Benefits of Projects (III)

15 Session Five: How Can Projects Help Me? What should Mary do? Create a written account Work collaboratively with her manager Discuss priorities with Dianne Ask for assistance Schedule regular update sessions Case Study: Mary Marvelous

16 Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle The sequence of activities from the beginning of a project to its completion is essentially the same for all projects. These activities can be grouped into four different phases. A phase of a project is a major set of activities. The Life Cycle (I)

17 Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle The Life Cycle (II)

18 Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle A project’s failure is usually due to several key factors. A coping technique should include asking for more information or summarizing. The Life Cycle (III)

19 Failure FactorsReasons for Success Good planning Communication plan Enough time and money Team commitment A good team leader Realistic goals/time frame Experience Clear goals Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle The Life Cycle (IV) Poor planning No communication Lack of resources/money Lack of commitment/team problems Poor choice of leader Setting unrealistic goals Lack of experience Unclear objectives

20 Session Six: A Project’s Life Cycle Three Ways to End a Project Fulfillment Partial Fulfillment Premature Termination The Life Cycle (V)

21 Session Seven: Selling a Project Have you ever taken an assignment and truly run with it? Taken it to a new level? Made it more valuable than it might otherwise have been? Tom Peters (I)

22 Session Seven: Selling a Project Start by determining why the project is worth doing. Identify the stakeholders. What role will each stakeholder take in the project? Can you find a project sponsor? Tom Peters (II)

23 Session Seven: Selling a Project The Priority Matrix (I) ProjectBenefitEasy to do Contribution to priority Total A B C D

24 Session Seven: Selling a Project The Priority Matrix (II)

25 Session Eight: Preparing Your Project Anticipation Assistance Location Timing Precautions Rewards Things to Consider

26 Session Nine: The Role of a Project Manager As a project manager, you need a clear idea of what you are to accomplish. Sit down with your supervisors to discuss their expectations and write it down. A Project Manager’s Skills

27 Session Nine: The Role of a Project Manager Well rounded Good at balancing competing demands Good at multi-tasking Able to define and meet goals Time management skills Good at documenting steps Self-confidence Flexibility Key Skills

28 Session Ten: Project Goals (I) Goals and objectives are important for a project’s success. You should be able to clearly describe the outcomes, deliverables, and benefits to stakeholders and end users.

29 Session Ten: Project Goals (II) Specific Prizes Individual Review Inspiring Time-Bound

30 Session Ten: Project Goals (III) Project goals must be agreed upon and come with clear responsibility. They should provide all of the criteria you need to evaluate the project’s success. Project goals need to be reviewed periodically.

31 Session Ten: Project Goals (IV) Why is it important for everyone to know what the goals are and what they must do to attain those goals? Can you identify the goals of your project? Do these goals fit the criteria for good goals?

32 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Formal project definition document. It is not a contract. It is a tool for clarifying responsibilities and relationships among project stakeholders. The Statement of Work (I)

33 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Defined Purpose Statement of Scope Project Deliverables Goals and Objectives SWOT Cost and Schedule Estimates List of Stakeholders Authority Levels Assumptions and Agreements The Communication Plan The Statement of Work (II)

34 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Project Planning Worksheet: The Basics Name of Project Brief description and overall benefits Project Number (if applicable) Priority Rating (if applicable) Request Date Project Planning Worksheet (I)

35 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Project Planning Worksheet: Time Management Time targets What are the primary objectives of the project? What are the secondary objectives? Milestone descriptions and dates How will you plan your time so you can still get your other work done? Project Planning Worksheet (II)

36 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Project Planning Worksheet: Cost Controls Budget or estimate Cost milestones and dates Financial benefits to be obtained Costs included How do you plan to keep time or dollar costs under control? Project Planning Worksheet (III)

37 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Project Planning Worksheet: Results Expected Specific objectives/results expected in order of importance Are there any constraints you are aware of? Plan for control of results Plan to minimize risks Project Planning Worksheet (IV)

38 Session Eleven: Laying Out the Project Project Planning Worksheet: Approvals Project Manager Project Manager's Supervisor Project Planning Worksheet (V)

39 Session Eleven: Laying Out a Project A good report is: Easy to understand Always clear As long as it needs to be (and no longer) Complete with all necessary information Correct Writing Reports (I)

40 Session Eleven: Laying Out a Project Writing Reports (II) RevisingWritingPlanningInvestigation

41 Session Eleven: Laying Out a Project Indirect Approach: Presents the evidence in a logical way; recommendations come last Direct Approach: Deliver recommendations up front and save the summary for last Writing Reports (III)

42 Agenda: Day Two 8:30-8:45Reconnect: Flying Around the Room 8:45-9:45Session Twelve: Project Risks 9:45-10:00Session Thirteen: Contingency Planning 10:00-10:15Break 10:15-11:30Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? 11:30-11:45Session Fifteen: The Work Breakdown Structure 11:45-12:00Morning Wrap-Up 12:00-1:00Lunch 1:00-1:15Energizer: Freeze Frame 1:15-2:30Session Sixteen: Planning Tools 2:30-2:45Break 2:45-3:00Session Seventeen: Budgets 3:00-4:00Session Eighteen: Teamwork 4:00-4:30Day Two Wrap-Up

43 Session Twelve: Project Risks Risk Tolerance

44 Session Twelve: Project Risks Known risks are those that you or your stakeholders can identify from experience. Predictable risks are those that might occur. Finally, there are the things that we just didn’t count on – the stuff that happens. About Risks (I)

45 Session Twelve: Project Risks Most Common Risks Funding Time Staff Customer relations Project size or complexity External factors About Risks (II)

46 Session Twelve: Project Risks Risk has two characteristics: Uncertainty Loss About Risks (III)

47 Session Twelve: Project Risks How can you reduce risks on your projects? How can risks be managed so you will be prepared for any problems that arise? Reducing Risks (I)

48 Session Twelve: Project Risks Project managers must: Identify potential problems and confront them. Focus on the project’s goals. Involve personnel at all levels of the project. Reducing Risks (II)

49 Session Twelve: Project Risks Sources of Risk Funding/Budget Time/Schedule Customer relations Project size People/Staff Technological Political Financial Contractual/Legal Physical Environmental Facilities and equipment Reducing Risks (III)

50 Session Twelve: Project Risks A constraint is something that will limit the project. It is a known factor and something that is considered in planning. Reducing Risks (IV)

51 Session Thirteen: Contingency Planning (I) Contingency planning is planning for a course of events that is other than what we want or expect. This is based on three beliefs: – Something is always waiting to go wrong – What will go wrong will be what you least expect – It will hit harder than you thought possible

52 Session Thirteen: Contingency Planning (II) Components of a Contingency Plan When? Who? Where? What?

53 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Use sticky notes and write every activity or task down as it comes to you. Then, start trying to put them in order. Start with the first activity you have identified. Ask yourself what comes right before that step, and what comes after that step. Beginning to Plan

54 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? 1.Consult architect 2.Obtain bank loan 3.Obtain building permit 4.Clear land 5.Excavate 6.Pour concrete foundation 7.Purchase materials 8.Construct frame Debrief (I)

55 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? 9.Install doors and windows 10.Sheath house 11.Roof house 12.Install plumbing 13.Install heating 14.Install insulation 15.Install electrical wiring 16.Install floors Debrief (II)

56 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? 17.Lay-up masonry exterior 18.Put up wall board 19.Install interior and exterior trim 20.Paint walls and trim 21.Paint doors and windows 22.Backfill foundation 23.Grade land 24.Landscape Debrief (III)

57 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? It is very important to include all affected members in the scheduling process. What are the advantages of creating a schedule with banner paper and self- stick notes over having a computer create a schedule? Preparing a Basic Schedule (I)

58 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Items To Gather Before Starting Schedules of people who will be working on the project Vacation time for staff Other projects that team members are involved in Schedules for materials and resources Preparing a Basic Schedule (II)

59 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Preparing a Basic Schedule (III) This formula is considered the standard for estimating time (T e ):

60 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Preparing a Basic Schedule (IV) Assign an optimistic, pessimistic, and probable time to each task Obtain the best estimates possible

61 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Other Scheduling Factors (I) Float time is the cushion you build into projects. Many projects build in a 10-15% contingency.

62 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Other Scheduling Factors (II) Scheduling Checklist How much information do they need? What form of schedule do they want or expect to see? Should I create customized versions?

63 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Other Scheduling Factors (III) Planning Tool Options Work breakdown structure (WBS) Milestone calendar or chart Gantt chart PERT/CPM diagram

64 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Other Scheduling Factors (IV) A schedule is first and foremost a communication tool. If people can’t understand it, it is useless.

65 Session Fourteen: What Really Needs to be Done? Other Scheduling Factors (V) You can save a lot of time and money by creating a plan that has several activities happening at the same time. Figuring out what project activities can occur simultaneously is a job for a veteran.

66 Session Fifteen: Work Breakdown Structure (I) A Work Breakdown Structure is simply taking the milestones and breaking them down into the tasks required to reach each milestone. The idea is to break larger tasks (milestones) down into smaller tasks (activities) or individual components.

67 Session Fifteen: Work Breakdown Structure (II)

68 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Basic Planning Tools The clock on the wall The calendar in the lunch room The planner on our desk (or computer) The meetings we attend Two Basic Tools (I)

69 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Action Planning Worksheets Most basic sheets show only those steps required to complete a project Additional information can be added to the basic worksheet Two Basic Tools (II)

70 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Milestone Charts Signify key accomplishment in your project Markers for summarizing work completed Two Basic Tools (III)

71 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Program Evaluation Review Technique List the steps required Estimate the time required to finish each step Draw a network of relationships among the steps PERT (I)

72 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools The critical path shows the shortest amount of time needed to complete a project. PERT (II)

73 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Bar charts that show activities as blocks of time. Once you have calculated the estimated duration for your project, you should fill in one of these. Gantt Charts

74 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Shows the path of the projects, lists start and finish dates, and names the responsible party for each task Reveals the workflow, not just the work The Network Diagram (I)

75 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools The Network Diagram (II)

76 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools List the tasks using your task list or your WBS Establish the interrelationships between tasks Identify milestones Lay out the tasks and milestones as a network Review the logic of the network The Network Diagram (III)

77 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools A rectangular box indicates a task. A box with rounded corners is a milestone. Precedence is indicated by the sequence of tasks joined with a line and an arrow. Concurrent tasks are shown in the same vertical pane. The Network Diagram (IV)

78 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools Gather people who represent the various parts of the process. Decide where the process begins and ends. Brainstorm the main activities and decision points. Arrange these activities and decision points in their proper order. As needed, break down the activities. The Flow Chart (I)

79 Session Sixteen: Planning Tools The Flow Chart (II)

80 Session Seventeen: Budgets (I) Most projects run on tight budgets. There are two major costing methods: – Bottom-up – Top-down Perhaps the best type of budget combines both methods.

81 Session Seventeen: Budgets (II) Why is time important when you are creating budgets? Costs require expert input. Establishing a reliable budget is likely the most difficult task a project manager faces.

82 Session Eighteen: Teamwork Members of the group must all feel that they are working toward a common goal. Individuals should understand their areas of responsibility. How can you keep interest high and the momentum going? Why is Teamwork Important?

83 Session Eighteen: Teamwork You won’t always have the advantage of being able to choose team members. People can often do more than you think they can. Remember the self-fulfilling prophecy: if you believe they can do it, they can! Building a Winning Team (I)

84 Session Eighteen: Teamwork Tips For Building A Winning Team Define roles. Make a list of all the skills needed to. Do a skills inventory. Be prepared to negotiate. Do the best you can with the people you have. Build training into the project. Consider hiring a contract position for a particular skill/task. Building a Winning Team (II)

85 Agenda: Day Three 8:30-8:45Reconnect: Monkey Business 8:45-9:15Session Nineteen: Developing Teams 9:15-10:15Session Twenty: Aspirinia 10:15-10:30Break 10:30-10:45Session Twenty-One: Communication Tips 10:45-11:00Session Twenty-Two: Closing Out a Project 11:00-11:30Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings 11:30-11:45Session Twenty-Four: Presentation Primer 11:45-12:00Morning Wrap-Up 12:00-1:00Lunch 1:00-1:15Energizer: Think Fast! 1:15-4:15Project Presentations 4:15-4:30Workshop Wrap-Up

86 Session Nineteen: Developing Teams Accountability Experience Resources Empowerment Four Issues to Address with Project Teams

87 Session Nineteen: Developing Teams Team Development FormingStorming NormingPerforming Adjourning

88 Session Twenty: Putting it Into Practice You have been selected to be a part of a team of scientists and astronauts getting ready to leave Earth to explore Aspirinia, a moon that appears able to sustain life and currently orbits Earth with our original Moon. There are several things that your team will need to do before leaving for Aspirinia!

89 Session Twenty: Putting it Into Practice Exercise Debrief (I) 1Hire security personnel 3Reassign resources 2Visit the neighboring village 5Make repairs to the space suits 4Form a team to create ration packages 8Establish your realistic launch date 7Send ahead two unmanned shuttles with supplies 6Arrange for a launch party that includes the villagers

90 Session Twenty: Putting it Into Practice Did the group assign a project manager or did you work toward consensus with the team as equals? Did someone on the team take a leading role or were they nominated? What are the advantages and disadvantages to having a project manager for this project? How did the team perform overall? Exercise Debrief (II)

91 Session Twenty-One: Communication Tips (I) How can you let others know of changes that affect the plans? How can you communicate progress and motivate others to continue giving their best? How can you motivate others to be as interested in the project at hand as you are?

92 Session Twenty-One: Communication Tips (II) How can you ask for information from people who have special knowledge or expertise? How do you hold meetings and make sure your manager has the time to meet with you?

93 Session Twenty-Two: Closing Out a Project (I) Project Closure Checklist Return items borrowed. Account for leased or rented equipment. Clean up after a conference, party, or banquet. Make sure all unfinished project activities are completed. Pay final bills and fulfill all contracts.

94 Session Twenty-Two: Closing Out a Project (II) Project Closure Checklist ctd. Return items borrowed. Present the finished project to stakeholders. Conduct post-project evaluations. Make sure all documentation ends up in the hands of those who will need it. Meet with team members and thank them for their efforts. If the project was a success, celebrate!

95 Session Twenty-Two: Closing Out a Project (III) You should have some plans for a smooth closing from the outset. Taking good notes for the duration of a project can benefit future projects. Projects should incorporate some kind of celebration for the successes achieved.

96 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (I) Individual Meetings Why was this person selected? What are the performance expectations? What are their individual priorities?

97 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (II) Information Gathering Who What Where When Why How

98 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (III) Agenda Planning Ensure that the proper individuals are invited Develop an agenda and set objectives Send the agenda and information requests to the team Book the appropriate space

99 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (IV) During the Meeting Make sure the meeting starts on time Encourage open communication Take notes Set some ground rules Introduce the members of the team Cover one agenda item at a time

100 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (V) During the Meeting ctd. Review priorities Review main points of the project Review individual plans Discuss methods and tools Establish the time/place for next meeting Agree on follow-up activities

101 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (VI) Seven Ingredients for Effective Meeting Management 1.Always have an agenda. 2.Focus on what’s important to the entire group. 3.Take action! 4.Train group members.

102 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (VII) Seven Ingredients for Effective Meeting Management ctd. 5.Hold your meetings in places that are free from interruptions and distraction. 6.Encourage open communication. 7.Ask for someone to be a note-taker (or appoint someone).

103 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (VIII) Making Committees Work A committee should be results- oriented. Small committees usually function best. Committees function best when one member agrees to serve as leader.

104 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (IX) Assigning Work Who will do the task? Make sure the expected results are clear in your mind. Put the employee at ease. Make sure you have allowed for adequate time to explain the assignment.

105 Session Twenty-Three: Team Meetings (X) Assigning Work ctd. Communication should be a two-way process. Define any limits or constraints. Help the employee feel comfortable. Get a commitment from the employee that they will do the task.

106 Session Twenty-Four: Presentation Primer (I) Project Management Presentation Background information Project goal statement What planning tools will you use? Explain the allocation of resources. What will you communicate? What conflicts could arise?

107 Session Twenty-Four: Presentation Primer (II) Presentation Strategies What is the problem to be solved? What is your solution to the problem? What are the benefits of the solution to both your organization and to the individuals in your audience? What is the action step?

108 Session Twenty-Four: Presentation Primer (III) Speaking with Confidence Stand, don’t sit. Make up cue cards or visual cues. Face the audience directly and focus on one person at a time. Use your hands. Ask questions to get questions. Look around when you answer a question. Neutralize negative questions.

109 Session Twenty-Five: Project Presentations Background information Project goal statement What planning tools will you use? Explain the allocation of resources. What will you communicate? What conflicts could arise?


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