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© 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 14 Consumer’s Surplus.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 14 Consumer’s Surplus."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 14 Consumer’s Surplus

2 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 2 Monetary Measures of Gains-to- Trade u You can buy as much gasoline as you wish at $1 per gallon once you enter the gasoline market. u Q: What is the most you would pay to enter the market?

3 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 3 Monetary Measures of Gains-to- Trade u A: You would pay up to the dollar value of the gains-to-trade you would enjoy once in the market. u How can such gains-to-trade be measured?

4 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 4 Monetary Measures of Gains-to- Trade u Three such measures are: –Consumer’s Surplus –Equivalent Variation, and –Compensating Variation. u Only in one special circumstance do these three measures coincide.

5 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 5 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Suppose gasoline can be bought only in lumps of one gallon. u Use r 1 to denote the most a single consumer would pay for a 1st gallon -- call this her reservation price for the 1st gallon. u r 1 is the dollar equivalent of the marginal utility of the 1st gallon.

6 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 6 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Now that she has one gallon, use r 2 to denote the most she would pay for a 2nd gallon -- this is her reservation price for the 2nd gallon. u r 2 is the dollar equivalent of the marginal utility of the 2nd gallon.

7 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 7 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Generally, if she already has n-1 gallons of gasoline then r n denotes the most she will pay for an nth gallon. u r n is the dollar equivalent of the marginal utility of the nth gallon.

8 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 8 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u r 1 + … + r n will therefore be the dollar equivalent of the total change to utility from acquiring n gallons of gasoline at a price of $0. u So r 1 + … + r n - p G n will be the dollar equivalent of the total change to utility from acquiring n gallons of gasoline at a price of $p G each.

9 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 9 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u A plot of r 1, r 2, …, r n, … against n is a reservation-price curve. This is not quite the same as the consumer’s demand curve for gasoline.

10 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 10 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r2r2 r3r3 r4r4 r5r5 r6r6

11 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 11 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u What is the monetary value of our consumer’s gain-to-trading in the gasoline market at a price of $p G ?

12 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 12 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u The dollar equivalent net utility gain for the 1st gallon is $(r 1 - p G ) u and is $(r 2 - p G ) for the 2nd gallon, u and so on, so the dollar value of the gain-to-trade is $(r 1 - p G ) + $(r 2 - p G ) + … for as long as r n - p G > 0.

13 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 13 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r2r2 r3r3 r4r4 r5r5 r6r6 pGpG

14 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 14 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r2r2 r3r3 r4r4 r5r5 r6r6 pGpG

15 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 15 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r2r2 r3r3 r4r4 r5r5 r6r6 pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade

16 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 16 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Now suppose that gasoline is sold in half-gallon units. u r 1, r 2, …, r n, … denote the consumer’s reservation prices for successive half-gallons of gasoline. u Our consumer’s new reservation price curve is

17 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 17 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r3r3 r5r5 r7r7 r9r9 r

18 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 18 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r3r3 r5r5 r7r7 r9r9 r pGpG

19 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 19 $ Equivalent Utility Gains r1r1 r3r3 r5r5 r7r7 r9r9 r pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade

20 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 20 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u And if gasoline is available in one- quarter gallon units...

21 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 21 $ Equivalent Utility Gains

22 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 22 $ Equivalent Utility Gains pGpG

23 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 23 $ Equivalent Utility Gains pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade

24 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 24 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Finally, if gasoline can be purchased in any quantity then...

25 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 25 $ Equivalent Utility Gains Gasoline ($) Res. Prices Reservation Price Curve for Gasoline

26 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 26 $ Equivalent Utility Gains Gasoline ($) Res. Prices pGpG Reservation Price Curve for Gasoline

27 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 27 $ Equivalent Utility Gains Gasoline ($) Res. Prices pGpG Reservation Price Curve for Gasoline $ value of net utility gains-to-trade

28 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 28 $ Equivalent Utility Gains u Unfortunately, estimating a consumer’s reservation-price curve is difficult, u so, as an approximation, the reservation-price curve is replaced with the consumer’s ordinary demand curve.

29 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 29 Consumer’s Surplus u A consumer’s reservation-price curve is not quite the same as her ordinary demand curve. Why not? u A reservation-price curve describes sequentially the values of successive single units of a commodity. u An ordinary demand curve describes the most that would be paid for q units of a commodity purchased simultaneously.

30 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 30 Consumer’s Surplus u Approximating the net utility gain area under the reservation-price curve by the corresponding area under the ordinary demand curve gives the Consumer’s Surplus measure of net utility gain.

31 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 31 Consumer’s Surplus Gasoline ($) Reservation price curve for gasoline Ordinary demand curve for gasoline

32 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 32 Consumer’s Surplus Gasoline Reservation price curve for gasoline Ordinary demand curve for gasoline pGpG ($)

33 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 33 Consumer’s Surplus Gasoline Reservation price curve for gasoline Ordinary demand curve for gasoline pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade ($)

34 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 34 Consumer’s Surplus Gasoline Reservation price curve for gasoline Ordinary demand curve for gasoline pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade Consumer’s Surplus ($)

35 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 35 Consumer’s Surplus Gasoline Reservation price curve for gasoline Ordinary demand curve for gasoline pGpG $ value of net utility gains-to-trade Consumer’s Surplus ($)

36 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 36 Consumer’s Surplus u The difference between the consumer’s reservation-price and ordinary demand curves is due to income effects. u But, if the consumer’s utility function is quasilinear in income then there are no income effects and Consumer’s Surplus is an exact $ measure of gains-to-trade.

37 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 37 Consumer’s Surplus The consumer’s utility function is quasilinear in x 2. Take p 2 = 1. Then the consumer’s choice problem is to maximize subject to

38 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 38 Consumer’s Surplus The consumer’s utility function is quasilinear in x 2. Take p 2 = 1. Then the consumer’s choice problem is to maximize subject to

39 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 39 Consumer’s Surplus That is, choose x 1 to maximize The first-order condition is That is, This is the equation of the consumer’s ordinary demand for commodity 1.

40 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 40 Consumer’s Surplus Ordinary demand curve, p1p1 CS

41 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 41 Consumer’s Surplus Ordinary demand curve, p1p1 CS

42 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 42 Consumer’s Surplus Ordinary demand curve, p1p1 CS

43 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 43 Consumer’s Surplus Ordinary demand curve, p1p1 CS is exactly the consumer’s utility gain from consuming x 1 ’ units of commodity 1.

44 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 44 Consumer’s Surplus u Consumer’s Surplus is an exact dollar measure of utility gained from consuming commodity 1 when the consumer’s utility function is quasilinear in commodity 2. u Otherwise Consumer’s Surplus is an approximation.

45 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 45 Consumer’s Surplus u The change to a consumer’s total utility due to a change to p 1 is approximately the change in her Consumer’s Surplus.

46 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 46 Consumer’s Surplus p1p1 p 1 (x 1 ), the inverse ordinary demand curve for commodity 1

47 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 47 Consumer’s Surplus p1p1 CS before p 1 (x 1 )

48 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 48 Consumer’s Surplus p1p1 CS after p 1 (x 1 )

49 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 49 Consumer’s Surplus p1p1 Lost CS p 1 (x 1 ), inverse ordinary demand curve for commodity 1.

50 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 50 Consumer’s Surplus p1p1 Lost CS x 1 *(p 1 ), the consumer’s ordinary demand curve for commodity 1. measures the loss in Consumer’s Surplus.

51 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 51 Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation u Two additional dollar measures of the total utility change caused by a price change are Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation.

52 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 52 Compensating Variation u p 1 rises. u Q: What is the least extra income that, at the new prices, just restores the consumer’s original utility level?

53 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 53 Compensating Variation u p 1 rises. u Q: What is the least extra income that, at the new prices, just restores the consumer’s original utility level? u A: The Compensating Variation.

54 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 54 Compensating Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 p1=p1’p1=p1’p 2 is fixed.

55 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 55 Compensating Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed.

56 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 56 Compensating Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed.

57 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 57 Compensating Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed. CV = m 2 - m 1.

58 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 58 Equivalent Variation u p 1 rises. u Q: What is the least extra income that, at the original prices, just restores the consumer’s original utility level? u A: The Equivalent Variation.

59 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 59 Equivalent Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 p1=p1’p1=p1’p 2 is fixed.

60 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 60 Equivalent Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed.

61 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 61 Equivalent Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed.

62 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 62 Equivalent Variation x2x2 x1x1 u1u1 u2u2 p1=p1’p1=p1”p1=p1’p1=p1” p 2 is fixed. EV = m 1 - m 2.

63 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 63 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation u Relationship 1: When the consumer’s preferences are quasilinear, all three measures are the same.

64 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 64 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation u Consider first the change in Consumer’s Surplus when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ”.

65 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 65 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation Ifthen

66 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 66 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation Ifthen and so the change in CS when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ” is

67 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 67 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation Ifthen and so the change in CS when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ” is

68 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 68 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation Ifthen and so the change in CS when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ” is

69 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 69 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation u Now consider the change in CV when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ”. u The consumer’s utility for given p 1 is and CV is the extra income which, at the new prices, makes the consumer’s utility the same as at the old prices. That is,...

70 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 70 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation

71 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 71 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation So

72 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 72 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation u Now consider the change in EV when p 1 rises from p 1 ’ to p 1 ”. u The consumer’s utility for given p 1 is and EV is the extra income which, at the old prices, makes the consumer’s utility the same as at the new prices. That is,...

73 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 73 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation

74 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 74 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation That is,

75 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 75 Consumer’s Surplus, Compensating Variation and Equivalent Variation So when the consumer has quasilinear utility, CV = EV =  CS. But, otherwise, we have: Relationship 2: In size, EV <  CS < CV.

76 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 76 Producer’s Surplus u Changes in a firm’s welfare can be measured in dollars much as for a consumer.

77 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 77 Producer’s Surplus y (output units) Output price (p) Marginal Cost

78 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 78 Producer’s Surplus y (output units) Output price (p) Marginal Cost

79 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 79 Producer’s Surplus y (output units) Output price (p) Marginal Cost Revenue =

80 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 80 Producer’s Surplus y (output units) Output price (p) Marginal Cost Variable Cost of producing y’ units is the sum of the marginal costs

81 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 81 Producer’s Surplus y (output units) Output price (p) Marginal Cost Variable Cost of producing y’ units is the sum of the marginal costs Revenue less VC is the Producer’s Surplus.

82 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 82 Benefit-Cost Analysis u Can we measure in money units the net gain, or loss, caused by a market intervention; e.g., the imposition or the removal of a market regulation? u Yes, by using measures such as the Consumer’s Surplus and the Producer’s Surplus.

83 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 83 Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price Supply Demand p0p0 q0q0 The free-market equilibrium

84 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 84 CS Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price Supply Demand p0p0 q0q0 The free-market equilibrium and the gains from trade generated by it. PS

85 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 85 CS Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price Supply Demand p0p0 q0q0 PS q1q1 Consumer’s gain Producer’s gain The gain from freely trading the q 1 th unit.

86 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 86 CS Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price Supply Demand p0p0 q0q0 The gains from freely trading the units from q 1 to q 0. PS q1q1 Consumer’s gains Producer’s gains

87 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 87 CS Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price Supply Demand p0p0 q0q0 The gains from freely trading the units from q 1 to q 0. PS q1q1 Consumer’s gains Producer’s gains

88 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 88 CS Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price p0p0 q0q0 PS q1q1 Consumer’s gains Producer’s gains Any regulation that causes the units from q 1 to q 0 to be not traded destroys these gains. This loss is the net cost of the regulation.

89 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 89 Tax Revenue Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price q0q0 PS q1q1 An excise tax imposed at a rate of $t per traded unit destroys these gains. psps pbpb t CS Deadweight Loss

90 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 90 Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price q0q0 q1q1 An excise tax imposed at a rate of $t per traded unit destroys these gains. pfpf CS Deadweight Loss So does a floor price set at p f PS

91 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 91 Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price q0q0 q1q1 An excise tax imposed at a rate of $t per traded unit destroys these gains. pcpc Deadweight Loss So does a floor price set at p f, a ceiling price set at p c PS CS

92 © 2010 W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 92 Benefit-Cost Analysis Q D, Q S (output units) Price q0q0 q1q1 An excise tax imposed at a rate of $t per traded unit destroys these gains. pcpc Deadweight Loss So does a floor price set at p f, a ceiling price set at p c, and a ration scheme that allows only q 1 units to be traded. PS pepe CS Revenue received by holders of ration coupons.


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