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1 Integrating Safety into Tribal Transportation Planning presented to XYZ presented by XYZ Date

2 1 Presentation Credits Developed for the interagency Transportation Safety Planning Working Group Developed by Cambridge Systematics Inc. ContactsContacts −Susan Herbel −Audrey Wennink −Sam Lawton

3 2 Overview Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

4 Need for Tribal Transportation Safety Planning

5 4 Native Americans Highest risk of motor-vehicle related death of all ethnic groupsHighest risk of motor-vehicle related death of all ethnic groups For ages 4 to 44, motor-vehicle related injuries are leading cause of deathFor ages 4 to 44, motor-vehicle related injuries are leading cause of death From 1975 to 2002 fatal crashes on Indian Reservations increased 52 percent 78 percent of Native Americans fatally injured were not using safety belts ( , FARS) 57 percent of fatally injured Native American drivers were drinking ( , FARS) 4

6 5 Fatally Injured Drivers by Race/Ethnicity and Blood Alcohol Concentration Source: NHTSA, Race and Ethnicity in Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes, % 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Percent WhiteBlackNative AmericanAsian/PIHispanic No Alcohol<.08 BAC>.08 BAC

7 6 Percentages of Drivers Killed with Alcohol by Sex and Race/Ethnicity 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Percent WhiteBlackNative AmericanAsian/PIHispanic MaleFemale Source: NHTSA, Race and Ethnicity in Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes,

8 7 Fatalities (Age 5 and Older) in Passenger Vehicles by Restraint Use and Race/Ethnicity Source: NHTSA, Race and Ethnicity in Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes, % 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Percent WhiteBlackNative AmericanAsian/PIHispanic Safety BeltsNo Restraints

9 8 Safety Challenges for Tribal Communities Road characteristics and maintenance Data management Occupant restraint Alcohol Law enforcement Pedestrian crashes 8

10 9 Road Characteristics and Maintenance Most Tribal lands are in rural, isolated locations Road maintenance on reservations is generally lacking due to under-funding Rural reservation road data is often limited or outdated Reservation roads often lag behind other road systems in design and safety standards Traffic markings and signs are limited

11 10 Data Management BIA and Tribal police departments often do not have standardized system for collecting and storing crash data Tribal traffic records are likely to be stored in multiple departments Addressed in Data Module in detail

12 11 Occupant Restraint Low safety belt use rates Overall, Native American safety belt use on reservations is 62 percent (2006) compared to a national average of 82 percent (2007)Overall, Native American safety belt use on reservations is 62 percent (2006) compared to a national average of 82 percent (2007) Child safety seat use is low – 27 percent ( , FARS)Child safety seat use is low – 27 percent ( , FARS) 11

13 12 Alcohol From 1982 to 2002, 65 percent of Native American fatal crashes involved alcohol, compared to the national average of approximately 47 percent More than 50 percent of Native American drivers in fatal crashes were over the legal limit (>=.08 BAC) (1999–2004, FARS)

14 13 Law Enforcement Police resources are very limited 2,380 BIA and tribal officers police 1.4 million Native Americans on 56 million acres of land2,380 BIA and tribal officers police 1.4 million Native Americans on 56 million acres of land About half of the number of officers per capita in other American communitiesAbout half of the number of officers per capita in other American communities Most reservations are rural and tribal members are located in small isolated communities remote from the tribal headquartersMost reservations are rural and tribal members are located in small isolated communities remote from the tribal headquarters Tribal/BIA police spend most of their time on law enforcement activities other than traffic enforcementTribal/BIA police spend most of their time on law enforcement activities other than traffic enforcement 13

15 14 Pedestrian Crashes Pedestrian death rates are five to seven times the national average Almost 70 percent of fatally-injured Native American pedestrians had been drinking at the time of the crash There is a high incident rate of train – pedestrian fatalities, often resulting from alcohol usage

16 15 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

17 16 What Is Transportation Planning?

18 17 What is Transportation Planning? Transportation Planning is process of developing strategies for design, construction, operation, maintenance and safety improvements of transportation facilities The purpose is to move people and goods and provide services to residents of local villages, towns, boroughs, cities, counties, metropolitan areas, states and countries The fundamental objective is to maximize the transportation benefits from the resources invested

19 18 Why Engage in Transportation Planning? Manage resources Address transportation needs and priorities Develop investment strategies Assure participation from the public throughout the planning process Ensure the transportation system meets current and future needs 18

20 19 What is the Purpose of Transportation Planning? Develop strategies for the entire transportation system including RoadsRoads Pedestrian facilitiesPedestrian facilities Bicycle facilitiesBicycle facilities TransitTransit Inventory existing transportation facilities Review existing transportation operations Solicit public participation Identify future transportation needs

21 20 Transportation Planning Linkages and Elements Linked to Land use (e.g., residential, commercial)Land use (e.g., residential, commercial) Cultural resourcesCultural resources Quality of lifeQuality of life Social goalsSocial goals Economic development goalsEconomic development goals Elements include DesignDesign ConstructionConstruction OperationOperation MaintenanceMaintenance 20

22 21 Key Partners in Transportation Planning Transportation affects everyone and must take a variety of interests into account Indian Tribal GovernmentsIndian Tribal Governments Federal Transportation AgenciesFederal Transportation Agencies Federal Land Management AgenciesFederal Land Management Agencies StatesStates Local GovernmentsLocal Governments Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs)Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) Regional Planning OrganizationsRegional Planning Organizations Special-interest GroupsSpecial-interest Groups PublicPublic

23 22 Transportation Planning Agencies and Processes Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) Agencies required by Federal government for all metropolitan areas with population greater than 50,000Agencies required by Federal government for all metropolitan areas with population greater than 50,000 Develop Metropolitan Long-Range Transportation PlanDevelop Metropolitan Long-Range Transportation Plan Develop Transportation Improvement Program (TIP)Develop Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) Conduct other planning on transportation issues, which may include safetyConduct other planning on transportation issues, which may include safety 22

24 23 Transportation Planning Agencies and Processes (continued) State DOTs Conduct planning in rural areasConduct planning in rural areas Develop State Long-Range Transportation PlansDevelop State Long-Range Transportation Plans Develop State Transportation Improvement Programs (STIP)Develop State Transportation Improvement Programs (STIP) Conduct other planning initiativesConduct other planning initiatives MPOs and States required to Include safety as a priority planning factorInclude safety as a priority planning factor Involve Tribal Governments in planning processInvolve Tribal Governments in planning process

25 24 Tribal Transportation Planning Tribal Planning Policy FHWA and FTA policy Require state, regional planning organizations, and metropolitan planning organizations to consult with Tribal GovernmentsRequire state, regional planning organizations, and metropolitan planning organizations to consult with Tribal Governments Must consider the interests of Tribal Governments in the development of transportation plans and programsMust consider the interests of Tribal Governments in the development of transportation plans and programs BIA and Tribal policy Develop Long-Range Transportation PlanDevelop Long-Range Transportation Plan Develop Tribal Transportation Improvement ProgramDevelop Tribal Transportation Improvement Program 24

26 25 IRR Training and Technical Assistance Local Technical Assistance Programs (LTAP) and Tribal Technical Assistance Programs (TTAP) Provide training and technical assistance to the transportation planning fieldProvide training and technical assistance to the transportation planning field BIA with FHWA and FTA Encourages and assists Tribal Governments in conducting transportation planningEncourages and assists Tribal Governments in conducting transportation planning

27 26 Transportation Planning Promoting transportation safety is a fundamental purpose of transportation planning

28 27 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

29 28 Transportation Safety Planning

30 29 Crashes Aren’t Accidents Crashes Aren’t Accidents Many crashes are preventableMany crashes are preventable Injury prevention is a public health issueInjury prevention is a public health issue Transportation Safety Planning is critical to improving the safety and quality of life for Native Americans

31 30 Transportation Safety Planning Process SAFETEA-LU SAFETEA-LU is the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users New Federal Transportation Reauthorization Passed in 2005 guiding transportation planning for New Federal Transportation Reauthorization Passed in 2005 guiding transportation planning for Increased emphasis on transportation safety planning Section 148 of SAFETEA-LU mandates the development of a Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP)

32 31 HSIP and HSP Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) State plan for safety infrastructure improvementsState plan for safety infrastructure improvements Federally fundedFederally funded State Governor’s Office of Highway Safety develops Highway Safety Plan (HSP) Focus largely on behavioral issues, e.g., safety belt use and impaired drivingFocus largely on behavioral issues, e.g., safety belt use and impaired driving Federal and state fundingFederal and state funding 31

33 32 SHSP State Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) Addresses 4E’s: Engineering, Education, Enforcement and Emergency responseAddresses 4E’s: Engineering, Education, Enforcement and Emergency response Evidence based using at least traffic crash dataEvidence based using at least traffic crash data Focus on “emphasis areas” and strategies with greatest potential payoffFocus on “emphasis areas” and strategies with greatest potential payoff Involves a wide range of stakeholders in the process including Tribal GovernmentsInvolves a wide range of stakeholders in the process including Tribal Governments Includes methods to measure performanceIncludes methods to measure performance

34 33 Relationship Between SHSP Transportation and Existing Planning and Programming Processes TIP(Metropolitan) Statewide Transportation Plan (Long Range Plan) Metropolitan Transportation Plans State Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) HSIP (23 U.S.C. § 148) CVSP* (49 U.S.C. § 31102) HSP (23 U.S.C. § 402) Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Other State Plans (e.g., Freight Plan, Ped/Bike Plan) *CVSP -Commercial Vehicle Safety Program

35 34 Integration of Safety and Transportation Planning Best Practices Identify safety as a major goal of the planning agency Develop a multi-disciplinary safety management process, with an emphasis on roadway safety Emphasize safety on all projects Designate a safety champion/coordinator Use current technologies (i.e., GIS and Internet) Develop community-based traffic safety programs

36 35 Best Practices (continued) Comprehensive, e.g., the “4 E’s” of safety (Engineering, Enforcement, Education, and Emergency response) Develop systematic and well-documented processes that can be sustained Create a traffic records coordinating committee Collect and use timely and accurate crash data Select hazardous locations for corrective action 35

37 36 Issues Unique to Tribes Tribal sovereignty Jurisdiction in Tribal and non-Tribal lands Confidentiality of data Cultural identity Tribal courts State versus Tribal relationship 36

38 37 Current Tribal Safety Planning Practices Existing Tribal transportation safety plans and programs have been developed in partnership with agencies/programs including Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Indian Highway Safety Program (BIA)Indian Highway Safety Program (BIA) Indian Health Service (IHS) Injury Prevention ProgramIndian Health Service (IHS) Injury Prevention Program Tribal Safe Community Program (NHTSA)Tribal Safe Community Program (NHTSA) State DOTs and local governmentsState DOTs and local governments

39 38 Current Tribal Planning Practices Examples of Tribal transportation safety projects Public service campaigns and active enforcement of safety belt laws and drunk drivingPublic service campaigns and active enforcement of safety belt laws and drunk driving High school education programs on safety belt use and bicycle safetyHigh school education programs on safety belt use and bicycle safety New legislation and enforcement of child safety seat useNew legislation and enforcement of child safety seat use Tribal funded and operated safety programs and campaignsTribal funded and operated safety programs and campaigns 38

40 39 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

41 40 Data – the Foundation of Transportation Safety Planning

42 41 Good Data is Fundamental Basis for all plan development Justification for funding Benchmark changes Develop priorities Evaluate the outcomes 41

43 42 Types of Data Traffic and roadway data Often available through county, state, and BIA filesOften available through county, state, and BIA files Can be collected through field inspections (Road Safety Audits)Can be collected through field inspections (Road Safety Audits) Traffic counts can be found in the IRR inventoryTraffic counts can be found in the IRR inventory Bridge inventoriesBridge inventories Traffic sign inventoriesTraffic sign inventories Pavement condition inventoriesPavement condition inventories

44 43 Types of Data (continued) Motor vehicle crash data Provides detail on each crash and individuals involvedProvides detail on each crash and individuals involved Insurance CompaniesInsurance Companies Emergency Medical Services (EMS)Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Medical FacilitiesMedical Facilities Helps identify contributing factorsHelps identify contributing factors −Safety belt use −Blood alcohol level −Roadway condition −Other contributing factors 43

45 44 Types of Data (continued) Geographic Indicators BoundariesBoundaries Zip codesZip codes Roadway logsRoadway logs MilepostMilepost Roadway Names/IntersectionRoadway Names/Intersection GPS coordinatesGPS coordinates Demographic indicators AgeAge GenderGender Tribal membershipTribal membership

46 45 Basic Data Needs Data recorded soon after crashes in a consistent format (preferably at the crash site) on approved crash reporting forms Crash records defined consistently with (NHTSA and MMUCC) standards to allow for comparative analysis Thorough record of each crash Sharing of crash data between agencies to the fullest extent possible Citation data and court disposition records (statistical only)

47 46 Use of Data Example – Menominee Reservation (WI) observational survey of occupant restraint use 22 percent belt use 22 percent belt use 9 percent child safety seat use 9 percent child safety seat use Showed that transportation safety strategies should focus on occupant restraint

48 47 Data to Identify Location and Severity of Crashes Navajo Nation Crash Location Analysis (2001)

49 48 Data to Identify Factors Contributing to Crashes Navajo Nation Contributing Factors Analysis (2001) AcyCommunity Rte Number Number Accidents MilesADT Acct Rate LocationBMPEMP Percent Accidents by Cause* Percent Accidents by Cause* N32Shiprock , NM64 btwn SW & NE Jct 2223 N33 Tuba City , Fr AZ264 to Warrior Dr N36 Window Rock , AZ264 fr N12 Jct to NM State line N36 Window Rock , AZ264 fr N112 Jct to N12 Jct % After Dark N36 Window Rock , N12 fr AZ264 Jct to Shonto Blvd N33 Tuba City , Fr N1017 to Warrior Dr % After Dark

50 49 Navajo Nation Roadway Safety Strategies Fencing for roads with high rates of animal crashes Street lights for roads with high crash rates after dark Lighting and intersection design for intersections with high crash numbers Access control for areas of development with high numbers of crashes Sidewalks and pedestrian crossings for roads with high pedestrian crash rates 49

51 50 Data to Identify Location and Severity of Crashes Navajo Nation Intersection Crash Location Analysis (2001)

52 51 Navajo Nation Intersection Safety Strategies Strategies to improve intersection safety Better intersection designBetter intersection design Raised mediansRaised medians Street lights in growth centersStreet lights in growth centers 51

53 52 Data Considerations Data considerations/issues What data does the Tribe have?What data does the Tribe have? What data will be shared outside the Tribe?What data will be shared outside the Tribe? Who will have access to shared data?Who will have access to shared data? −Data in government databases is usually available to the public What are the purposes for using the data?What are the purposes for using the data? How will the Tribe be involved in the process (i.e., oversight, reports, review?)How will the Tribe be involved in the process (i.e., oversight, reports, review?) What are the advantages or disadvantages to the Tribes in sharing data?What are the advantages or disadvantages to the Tribes in sharing data?

54 53 Data Considerations (continued) Determine Responsibilities for storage and maintenanceResponsibilities for storage and maintenance Standards for integrating dataStandards for integrating data Methodology for integrating dataMethodology for integrating data Develop Tribal traffic records coordination committee Establish Tribal policies on traffic records management Internal data storageInternal data storage Maintenance responsibilitiesMaintenance responsibilities Consider NHTSA guidelines when developing a traffic records system Improve communications between planners/engineers and law enforcement personnel on data needs

55 54 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

56 55 Planning Products and Desired Outcomes

57 56 Products and Desired Outcomes Coordination with External Planning Processes Advantageous to Tribal Governments to be part of the state/MPO planning process Participate in development of the transportation plans and programsParticipate in development of the transportation plans and programs Participate in development of state/regional transportation safety plans… particularly the SHSPParticipate in development of state/regional transportation safety plans… particularly the SHSP Access to fundingAccess to funding Best Practice – Maricopa Association of Governments (Phoenix MPO) has two tribal members Gila River Indian CommunityGila River Indian Community Fort McDowell Yavapai NationFort McDowell Yavapai Nation

58 57 Products and Desired Outcomes Tribal Plans and Programs Tribes may develop their own Tribal plans including Tribal Long-Range Transportation Plan (TLRTP)Tribal Long-Range Transportation Plan (TLRTP) Tribal Strategic Highway Safety Plan (TSHSP)Tribal Strategic Highway Safety Plan (TSHSP) Tribal Highway Safety Improvement Program (THSIP)Tribal Highway Safety Improvement Program (THSIP) 57

59 58 Products and Desired Outcomes Tribal Safety Programs Tribal Safety Programs ObjectivesObjectives −Reduce the number of and severity of motor vehicle crashes −Decrease the potential for crashes Identify and address highway safety needs, i.e.,Identify and address highway safety needs, i.e., −Unsafe highways −Impaired driving −Traffic records improvements −Child passenger safety education −NHTSA-sponsored Safety Assessments −Road safety audits

60 59 Tribal Safety Programs Tribal considerations Utilize available Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) guidelinesUtilize available Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) guidelines Review and consider revising outdated Tribal transportation and traffic codes in the THSIP planReview and consider revising outdated Tribal transportation and traffic codes in the THSIP plan Develop THSIP plan in coordination with Tribal transportation planning processDevelop THSIP plan in coordination with Tribal transportation planning process Coordinate with Safety Management System (SMS)Coordinate with Safety Management System (SMS)

61 60 Tribal Safety Programs (continued) Tribal Transportation Safety Management System (SMS) Federally mandated that BIA develop a SMS to address safety on Tribal landsFederally mandated that BIA develop a SMS to address safety on Tribal lands Administered by BIA and FHWA with assistance from other safety partnersAdministered by BIA and FHWA with assistance from other safety partners Each Tribe is encouraged, but not required, to develop its own SMSEach Tribe is encouraged, but not required, to develop its own SMS 60

62 61 Tribal Safety Programs (continued) HSIP is a state requirement Requires a Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) be developedRequires a Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) be developed Annual report must be completed describing 5% of state’s most severe safety locationsAnnual report must be completed describing 5% of state’s most severe safety locations Annual reports required describing progress and effectiveness of HSIPAnnual reports required describing progress and effectiveness of HSIP Tribes are encouraged to develop their own HSIP in coordination with the state

63 62 Eligible HSIP Projects Intersection safety Pavement and shoulder widening Rumble strips Skid resistant surface Pedestrian, bicycle, disabled improvements Railway-highway crossing safety improvements Traffic calming Safety conscious planning 62

64 63 Eligible HSIP Projects (continued) Elimination of a roadside obstacle Improvement in highway signage Improvement in data collection and analysis Work zone safety Guardrails and barriers Measures to reduce wildlife crashes Signs at pedestrian-bicycle crossings and in school zones Improvements on high-risk rural roads

65 64 THSIP Development Initiate development of THSIP Determine whether a Tribe has a highway safety problem Select funding sources Plan for THSIP or safety project Implement the THSIP based on this plan 64

66 65 Model Process Flow of Activities Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Task 4 Tribal Council Appoints THSIP Team Preliminary Highway Safety Assessment Council Briefings on Highway Safety Programs Council Decisions on Investigating Highway Safety Programs Process Ends or Tribe Funds Own THSIP Identify Potential THSIP Benefits and Costs for Tribe Identify Tribal Actions Necessary to Effectively Compete for Funds Identify Funding for Developing THSIP or Safety Project Plans Preliminary Selection of Funding Sources to Pursue Process Ends or Tribe Funds Own THSIP Prepare Scope of Work for Planning a THSIP or Highway Safety Project Plan Secure Funding for Development of THSIP or Highway Safety Project Develop Plan for THSIP or Highway Safety Project Establish THSIP/Safety Project Implementation Team and Coordinator Secure Funding and Technical Support for THSIP/Safety Project Implementation Implement THSIP/Safety Project per Plan Evaluate Safety Project(s) NO YES NO YES

67 66 HSIP Data Requirements 5% report of most dangerous locations Methods should primarily be based on fatalities and serious injuriesMethods should primarily be based on fatalities and serious injuries Determine if reporting will be problematic given existing capacity and data Consider community concerns about potentially hazardous locations, even without crash history Confer with the state DOT on hazardous roadway locations before project development (may preclude state questioning Tribal prioritization of hazardous locations)

68 67 Products and Desired Outcomes Tribal Long-Range Transportation Plan (TLRTP) TLRTP development Establish policy, goals, and objectivesEstablish policy, goals, and objectives Analyze transportation system conditionsAnalyze transportation system conditions Perform needs analysisPerform needs analysis Set prioritiesSet priorities Establish funding planEstablish funding plan Develop the planDevelop the plan Develop the programDevelop the program Implement and monitor the planImplement and monitor the plan

69 68 FUNDING SOURCES Incorporating Safety into the Transportation Planning Process LRTP TTIP IRR TIP State TIP Safety Committee Input Tribal Council Policies Other Sources Construct Project Evaluate

70 69 Transportation Safety Behavioral Approach LRTP TTIP Safety Committee Input Tribal Council Policies State Highway Safety Offices Indian Highway Safety Program State Department of Transportation Other Sources FUNDING SOURCES Implement Program Evaluate

71 70 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

72 71 Funding

73 72 IRR Transportation Planning Funds “Up to 2 percent of funds made available for IRR each fiscal year shall be allocated to those Indian Tribal Governments applying for transportation planning pursuant to the provisions of the Indian Self- Determination and Education Assistance Act” (23 U.S.C. §204 (J)) In addition to the 2 percent set-aside, Transportation Planning is an eligible item that can be funded with a Tribe’s share of IRR funds

74 73 IRR Transportation Planning Funds (continued) Administered by BIADOT and FHWA Federal Lands Highway Office Available to Indian Tribal Governments for transportation planning on Indian lands Tribes prioritize how IRR funds will be used at the tribal level

75 74 IRR Transportation Planning Funds (continued) Eligible activities include but are not limited to Transportation planningTransportation planning Tribal representation at transportation planning meetingsTribal representation at transportation planning meetings Preparation of application for funds from other sourcesPreparation of application for funds from other sources Planning related activities for other modes such as transitPlanning related activities for other modes such as transit Employment of a transportation plannerEmployment of a transportation planner Research of right-of-way records for transportation planning purposesResearch of right-of-way records for transportation planning purposes Other activities in a proposal that is mutually agreeable to the Indian Tribal Government and the Secretary of the InteriorOther activities in a proposal that is mutually agreeable to the Indian Tribal Government and the Secretary of the Interior

76 75 IRR Program Funds IRR Program Funding IRR funds allocated to tribes from FHWA through the BIA are based on a Tribal share formula determined from population and data in the IRR InventoryIRR funds allocated to tribes from FHWA through the BIA are based on a Tribal share formula determined from population and data in the IRR Inventory Priorities for construction and improvement of roads, bridges, and transit facilities leading to, and within, Indian reservations or other Indian lands are determined by the local Tribal governmentPriorities for construction and improvement of roads, bridges, and transit facilities leading to, and within, Indian reservations or other Indian lands are determined by the local Tribal government IRR funds may be used on any eligible transportation project or facility prioritized by the Tribal government consistent with Title 23IRR funds may be used on any eligible transportation project or facility prioritized by the Tribal government consistent with Title 23 IRR Program Funds may pay for the local match for many other fund categoriesIRR Program Funds may pay for the local match for many other fund categories A Tribe may use up to $35,000 or 5% of its IRR Program construction fund, whichever is greater, for transportation planning. However, BIA will subtract the exceeding amount from the Tribe’s CTC for the following year, if the Tribe exceeds this thresholdA Tribe may use up to $35,000 or 5% of its IRR Program construction fund, whichever is greater, for transportation planning. However, BIA will subtract the exceeding amount from the Tribe’s CTC for the following year, if the Tribe exceeds this threshold

77 76 NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) administered through the state Governor’s representative (safety only) State and Community Highway Safety GrantState and Community Highway Safety Grant Intoxicated Driver Prevention ProgramIntoxicated Driver Prevention Program Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive GrantsAlcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive Grants Safety Incentive Grants for Safety Belt UseSafety Incentive Grants for Safety Belt Use Occupant Protection Incentive GrantsOccupant Protection Incentive Grants State Highway Safety Data Improvement GrantsState Highway Safety Data Improvement Grants Child Passenger Education ProgramChild Passenger Education Program Research and Demonstration GrantsResearch and Demonstration Grants TrainingTraining

78 77 BIA Indian Highway Safety Program (IHSP) Funded by NHTSA with BIA being considered as a state Administered by BIA Office of Indian Highway Safety Program in Albuquerque Programs include many of the same programs available to states for Highway SafetyPrograms include many of the same programs available to states for Highway Safety These highway safety funds are set aside in SAFETEA-LU for Tribal governments the same as the highway safety funds are set aside to be allocated to statesThese highway safety funds are set aside in SAFETEA-LU for Tribal governments the same as the highway safety funds are set aside to be allocated to states

79 78 States State funded and administered in some states State Highway FundsState Highway Funds State Safety FundsState Safety Funds Transportation Loan ProgramsTransportation Loan Programs 78

80 79 Other Organizations Indian Health Services (IHS) Injury prevention trainingInjury prevention training Motor vehicle crash reporting and analysis trainingMotor vehicle crash reporting and analysis training Fellowships for Epidemiology and Tribal CapacityFellowships for Epidemiology and Tribal Capacity Other Federal departments such as Energy, Education, Housing and Urban Development, Agriculture, Justice, and Health and Human Services Tribal funding Tribal health programsTribal health programs

81 80 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

82 81 Summary

83 82 Fundamentals of Tribal Transportation Safety Planning Develop data collection and storage systems Analyze data to determine priorities Collaborate to extend Tribal resources Use the process to build Tribal capacity Highway Safety Planning is critical to Tribal quality of life 82

84 83 Tribal Transportation Safety Planning Tribal transportation safety planning can save lives and reduce injury among Native Americans

85 84 Tribal Transportation Safety Planning (continued) Tribal transportation safety planning requires coordination but can be integrated into existing programs 84

86 85 Tribal Transportation Safety Planning (continued) Resources are available to support Tribal transportation safety planning

87 86 Tribal Transportation Safety Planning (continued) Many Tribes have succeeded in establishing effective transportation safety plans and programs It can be done!

88 87 Resources

89 88 To Go to Another Section Click the Link Below Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? Why is Tribal Transportation Safety Planning necessary? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What is Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What role does data play in Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? What are the products resulting from Transportation Safety Planning? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? How can we fund the Transportation Safety Planning process and projects? Summary – What have we learned? Summary – What have we learned?

90 89 The following slides are considered non-essential but are available if desired

91 90 Tribal Highway Safety Programs 1. Determine whether a Tribe has a highway safety problem Appoint team of relevant agencies to investigate magnitude of the problemAppoint team of relevant agencies to investigate magnitude of the problem Determine safety outcomesDetermine safety outcomes Identify available highway safety funding programsIdentify available highway safety funding programs Present Highway safety assessment recommendations to the Tribal CouncilPresent Highway safety assessment recommendations to the Tribal Council Tribal Council decides whether to pursue initiating a safety projectTribal Council decides whether to pursue initiating a safety project If moving forward, initiate administrative briefings on program goals and funding requirementsIf moving forward, initiate administrative briefings on program goals and funding requirements  Tribal Council decides whether to investigate highway safety program funding

92 91 Tribal Highway Safety Programs 2. Select Funding Sources Identify program benefits and costsIdentify program benefits and costs Identify program funding availabilityIdentify program funding availability For Example To fund passenger restraint programs: NHTSA funds can be used for public relations campaigns to promote safety belt use IRR construction funds can be used for “buckle up” signs along roadways

93 92 Tribal Highway Safety Programs Determine program requirements to secure fundingDetermine program requirements to secure funding Determine Tribal actions needed to secure fundingDetermine Tribal actions needed to secure funding Contact funding agencies to determine availability of fundsContact funding agencies to determine availability of funds  Determine safety funding sources 92

94 93 Tribal Highway Safety Programs 3. Plan for a highway-safety project May be an ongoing commitment or short-term commitment through single safety projectMay be an ongoing commitment or short-term commitment through single safety project Planning should describe organization of program or projectPlanning should describe organization of program or project Prepare scope of work for safety projectPrepare scope of work for safety project  Develop Project(s)

95 94 Tribal Highway Safety Programs 4. Implement safety projects Establish implementation team and coordinatorEstablish implementation team and coordinator Secure funding and technical supportSecure funding and technical support Implement projectImplement project Evaluate projectEvaluate project  Implement Project(s)


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