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1 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 2 Reading Informational Text Grade.

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1 1 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 2 Reading Informational Text Grade

2 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 2 Important Information A.This booklet is divided into two parts… 1.Teacher’s Resources a.Page 1 – 10 2.Students Assessment (for students who read independently)-(to be printed in a booklet form) b.Pages 11 – 26 B.This booklet is intended for pre-assessing reading informational standards RI5,6 and 7 at the beginning of the second quarter. Do NOT allow students to read the passages before the assessment. Students who do not read independently should be given the assessment as a listening comprehension test. Do NOT read the passage to the students until it is time for the assessment B.Student scores can be recorded on the Class Learning Progressions Checklists. Each correct response is one point. If students do not read the story independently write LC (listening comprehension) by their name. Printing Instructions… Decide on the primary way to use this booklet, then choose one of the following ways to print this material. You can just print this entire 26 pages – then divide it into the two sections to use. This would print each student page as an 8 ½ X 11 page.OR… You might do the following by sending them to your Print Shop: Print Shop instructions… Print pages 11 – 26 in a Small Student Booklet format. Set print driver properties to - - Original size 8 ½ x 11 Paper size = 11x17 Print type = Small Student Booklet

3 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 3 Directions for Pre-Assessment Independent Readers: Students read selections independently without reading assistance. Students complete the selected response answers by shading in the bubble. Students complete the constructed response answers by writing a response for each question. Non-Independent Readers: (Please indicate on record sheet if student is Not an Independent Reader) Read the selection and questions aloud to the student in English or Spanish. Read the selected response answers to the student. Read the constructed response answers to the student. You may write the answer the student says unless he/she is able to do so Note: Note: The constructed response questions do NOT assess writing proficiency and should not be scored as such. The constructed responses are evidence of reading comprehension. Remind students to STOP on the stop page. Do not allow them to go on to the “happy face” page until you have scored their answers. When Scoring.... (Class Learning Progressions Checklists) When students have finished the entire pre-assessment mark each selected response question as correct or incorrect and the constructed response score ONLY with a number from 0 – 3. Write and Revise Scoring... (Please Read Page 4). A special section for Write and Revise selected response questions have been added to the second quarter pre- assessment. Write and Revise is NOT on the Class Learning Progressions Checklists (as these are reading informational text only) or the Class Assessment Summary Sheet. DO NOT write recommendations for the student about why a score was incorrect in their test booklet. It is important for students to reflect on their own answers after the tests are scored on the reflection sheet (last page of student booklet). Student Self-Check Written in “I Can...” Return the scored booklets to the students. On the selected response questions students color happy faces green if their answers were correct or red if they were not correct. Students color the number square blue that shows their constructed response points. The last page in the student booklet is a reflection page. This last page activity is invaluable for understanding how to differentiate student instructional needs. Present ONE specific question for students to reflect on concerning incorrect answers. They can do this on their own, with a peer or with a teacher. Example reflections questions might include: What did you not understand about the question? Underline words you did not understand. Rewrite the question to what you think it is asking

4 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 4 Write and Revise The Common Core standards are integrative in nature. Student proficiency develops and is assessed on a continuum. The HSD, Common Formative Assessment (CFA) for quarter two includes three write and revise assessed categories to prepare our students for this transition in conjunction with our primary focus of Reading Informational Text. Quarter 2 1.Students “Read to Write” integrating basic writing and language revision skills. Write and Revised Assessed Categories for Quarter Two a.Writing: Write and Revise (revision of short text) b.Language: Language and Vocabulary Use (accurate use of words and phrases) c.Language: Edit and Clarify (accurate use of grammar, mechanics and syntax) Quarter 3 1.Students write expanded constructed responses and move toward “Full Compositions.” Quarter 4 1.Students respond to a prompt requiring integrative research as part of a “Performance Task” evidenced by a full composition, speech or visual display.

5 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 5 Quarter Two Pre-Assessment Reading Informational Text Learning Progressions with Adjustment Points (in purple). Grade 5 Path to DOK - 1Path to DOK - 2 Continued to next page DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - CkDOK 2 - APn Path to DOK 2,4 Informational Text Learning Progression s Locates or recalls basic information in multiple texts regarding concepts, events, ideas, and information (read and discussed in class). Define and Understand the meaning of the Standard Academic Language: text structure (include: compare and contrast, chronology, problem/solution, cause/effect, comparison, etc…), events, ideas and concepts. Answer who, what, when, where or how questions about events, ideas, concepts or information in two or more texts (read but not discussed in class). Concept Development Understands that different texts can have different text structures and explains why. Identify these specific text structures in informational text: chronological order, cause and effect, comparisons, problem and solution Obtain information using text structures to answer informational questions (which text structure uses cause and effect to …? etc…). Grade 5 Path to DOK - 3Path to DOK - 4 Continued from previous page…End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 2 - ANpDOK 2 - ANrDOK 3 - APxDOK 3 - SYhDOK 4 - SYUStandard Path to DOK 2,4 Informational Text Learning Progressions Compare or categorize different text features (i.e., language) seen in: chronological order, cause and effect, comparisons and problem and solution structures. Analyze format, organization and internal text structures (signal words, transitions and semantic cues) of different texts. Apply the understanding of studied text structures by determining which text was most effective in presenting events, ideas or concepts (not read or discussed in class). Synthesize how an overall structure is used in the explanation of an event, idea or concept in one text. Synthesize the text structures in multiple texts in order to compare and contrast (use examples from various texts) to support a specific criteria (i.e., an opinion or example). RI5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, and problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts. Grade 5 Path to DOK - 1Path to DOK - 2Path to DOK - 3Path to DOK - 4 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - Cl DOK 2 - ANp DOK 3 - EVEDOK 4 - ANN DOK 4 - SYV Standard Path to DOK 3,4 Informationa l Text Learning Progressions Recall basic facts about a topic or event from multiple accounts (read and discussed in class). Define and Understand the meaning of the Standard Academic Language: point of view, bias, similarities, differences, events, topics, evidence, multiple accounts and represent. Answer specific who, what, when, where or how questions about the same topic or event from multiple accounts (read but the questions have not been discussed in class). Concept Development Understands and recognizes that multiple accounts may have different points about the same topic Find examples of specific points in multiple accounts. Categorize specific points from multiple accounts with similar points of view (no contrasting at this point, just comparing). Verify the reasonableness of how specific points from multiple texts are presented (are the points valid?). Analyze (compare and contrast) multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent (venn). Synthesize specific points across multiple texts on the same event or topic to articulate a new perspective. RI5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. Grade 5 DOK - 1DOK – 2 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 – ChDOK 2 – ClDOK 2 - APnStandard Path to DOK 2 Informational Text Learning Progressions Locate or recall basic facts in multiple print or digital sources (read and discussed in class). Define and Understand the meaning of the Standard Academic Language: digital sources, print sources and their uses for locating information (dictionary, atlas, thesaurus, encyclopedia, etc.). Answer specific who, what, when, where or how questions about information found in digital or print sources read but not discussed specifically. Concept Development Understands that specific types of information can be found within a print or digital source and gives an example. Locate specific information in appropriate multiple print or digital sources. Using text features efficiently as a guide, obtain and interpret information found in multiple print or digital sources. RI5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently

6 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 6 Scoring Directions: selected response For students who read independently, record student pre-assessment selected response scores on Class Learning Progressions Checklists (below) for instructional adjustments. Students who do not read independently should have LC written by their name to indicate the story was read to them. The second quarter CFA score can be recorded in the last column as a comprehensive score. Class Learning Progressions Checklist (for pre-assessments) Assessment Summary Sheet (for Pre-Assessment and CFA) Grade 5 DOK - 1DOK – 2 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 – ChDOK 2 – ClDOK 2 - APnStandard Path to DOK 2 Informational Text Learning Progressions Locate or recall basic facts in multiple print or digital sources (read and discussed in class). Define and Understand the meaning of the Standard Academic Language: digital sources, print sources and their uses for locating information (dictionary, atlas, thesaurus, encyclopedia, etc.). Answer specific who, what, when, where or how questions about information found in digital or print sources read but not discussed specifically. Concept Development Understands that specific types of information can be found within a print or digital source and gives an example. Locate specific information in appropriate multiple print or digital sources. Using text features efficiently as a guide, obtain and interpret information found in multiple print or digital sources. RI5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently

7 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 7 SBAC Reading Assessment Constructed Response General Template Short Constructed Response Short constructed response sample questions are designed to assess CCLS reading standards. These are single questions that ask students to respond to a prompt or question by stating their answer and providing textual evidence to support their answer. The goal of the short response questions is to require students to succinctly show their ability to comprehend text. In responding to these questions, students will be expected to write in complete sentences.

8 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Compare the paragraphs in The American Revolutionary War. Describe at least two different text structures the author uses. Give examples from the text. Scoring [Notes “Teacher and Rubric Language”] Essential Elements: Students must recognize and name two different text structures in the passage. Examples should be given (the name of the passage or quotes from the passage as evidence). Students write about the prompt and do not veer from the prompt. Aspects/Evidence: Aspects of this task should include sources of evidence that demonstrate understanding text structures. At least two passages should be named, which may include cause and effect (The Turning Point), compare and contrast ( A New Way to Fight – also has some cause and effect elements and Divided), description or problem/solution (Fire Cakes) and sequence (Allies). Specific evidence from each passage should support the text structure (i.e., “Allies has a sequence text Structure because dates are given to show when events happened”). Organization: Students writing is focused and organized. Sentences are appropriate to task. Constructed Response RI.5.5

9 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What specific points in How Limestone Caves are Formed and Who Was Jim White, are similar? Which points are different? Give examples from both passages. Scoring [Notes “Teacher and Rubric Language”] Essential Elements: Students must show the essential elements of addressing how two passages are similar and different, giving examples from both. Students should not veer from the prompt. Aspects/Evidence: Sufficient evidence and aspects of that evidence would include recognizing the similarities of the two passages. Similarities should include that each passage is about limestone caves/caverns. Examples of similarities could include connecting how Carlsbad Caverns was formed in the same way as the caves mentioned in How Limestone Caves are Formed. Differences between the two passages should include that each passage has a different purpose. Students should give details of the different purposes. Some of the differences should include who explored the Carlsbad Caverns and examples about the development of limestone caves. Organization: Students should stay on topic and organize their writing in a logical way (evidence to support similarities and differences). Sentences should vary as needed (simple and complex). Constructed Response RI.5.6

10 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 10 Quarter 2 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key

11 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 11 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 2 Reading Informational Text Name ____________________ Grade

12 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 12 The American Revolutionary War 1. Divided During the American Revolutionary War, Americans were divided into two groups; the Patriots and the Loyalists. American Patriots fought England in order to be free from English laws. American Loyalists did not want to be free from English laws. Loyalists hoped the English King would reward them for supporting England, if the Americans lost the war. Although both the Patriots and Loyalists were Americans, they were divided. 2. The Turning Point At the beginning of the war, Americans lost many battles. Other countries were afraid to help America if they could not win. A turning point in the war was the Battle of Saratoga (when Americans captured a unit of the British army). Some countries heard that America won an important battle and decided to help America. 3. A New Way to Fight There were more British than American soldiers. The British soldiers were also trained better and had better weapons than the American soldiers. After the American soldiers lost many battles, they decided to fight in a new way. They set traps and had surprise attacks. They destroyed British wagons and weapons. American soldiers learned to spy on the British. Because of this new way of fighting, the American soldiers began to win the war. 4. Fire Cakes American soldiers during the Revolutionary War did not have enough food to eat. How did they solve this problem? Fire Cakes! Fire cakes are a horrible tasting blob of burnt wheat. The soldiers first mixed flour with water until it was a thick, damp dough. They then formed it into a cake. Last, the cake was put over fire until it was brown. The fire cakes tasted awful, but it helped soldiers survive. 5. Allies During the Revolutionary War, Americans learned just how important friends can be. When the Americans declared independence on July 4 th, 1776, they had virtually no allies. But on February 6 th, 1778, after the American victory at Saratoga, the French helped the American cause. The French gave the Americans huge amounts of money. Then in June of 1779 the Spanish joined the fight against the British. The Spanish protected American seaports and supply ships. Without the help of these allies, many more Americans would have died in the fight for independence from the British. Five Common Text Structures DescriptionCause/EffectCompare/ContrastSequenceProblem/Solution

13 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond toward RI.5.5 DOK 3 - APx Apply the understanding of studied text structures by determining which text was most effective in presenting events, ideas or concepts. toward RI.5.5 DOK 2 - APn Obtain information using text structures to answer informational questions. 13 Name ______________ 1.Which paragraph in the passage The American Revolutionary War, shows a time sequence? A.Divided B.The Turning Point C.Fire Cake D.Allies 1 2. Which paragraph in the passage The American Revolutionary War, best explains why the Americans were fighting the British? A.Divided B.A New Way to Fight C.Fire Cake D.Allies 2

14 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond toward RI.5.6 DOK 1 - Cf Answer specific who, what, when, where or how questions about the same topic or event from multiple accounts (paragraphs). toward RI.5.5 DOK 4 - SYu Synthesize the text structures in multiple texts (paragraphs) in order to compare and contrast an opinion or example Which statement best explains why American soldiers began to win battles? A.American soldiers won the Battle of Saratoga and ate fire cakes to survive. B.American soldiers had help from the Loyalists and fought a “New Way.” C.American soldiers had help from allies and fought a “New Way.” D.Americans were divided and they received money from France How were the Americans able to protect their supply ships during the war? A.The Spanish protected the seaports and the supply ships. B.French soldiers came to fight the British. C.The Americans had many allies. D.The British did not attack the American supply ships. 4

15 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Compare the paragraphs in The American Revolutionary War. Describe at least two different text structures the author uses. Give examples from the text. (RI.6)

16 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 16 Who Was Jim White? Jim White was a ranch hand in Carlsbad, New Mexico. He worked for pioneer ranchers who were mining bat guano from the outer areas of the limestone caves near Carlsbad. Bat guano is another name for bat droppings. Pioneers had discovered that bat guano made excellent fertilizer for the farmers. He was hired as foreman at the mines, although he was just a teenager! But Jim White wasn’t like other teenagers. He was not happy with mining just the outer areas of the caves. The caves were near Jim’s home. Jim often saw huge numbers of bats leave the cave in the early evening. The numbers of bats were so vast they seemed to form a thick cloud of black as they left the caves to feed. He thought limestone caves must be very large because there were so many bats. Jim knew the miners only entered the outer areas of the caves because there was a 60 foot drop off! No one wanted to go much further into the caves. But, Jim was curious. In 1898, at the age of 15, he began exploring the caves with only a ladder. Jim found a vast underground wilderness of huge rooms and corridors. He told many people about what he had found but they did not believe him. The idea of huge underground rooms and corridors was just too much for many people to believe! In spite of what people thought, Jim spent many years exploring the underground rooms alone. He gave many of the rooms inside the caves the names they still have today. Finally, twenty-one years later in 1915, Ray V. Davis, a photographer went with Jim to some of the underground rooms and took pictures. Davis displayed some of the pictures in the nearby town of Carlsbad. The town people of Carlsbad were excited. Jim began to give tours of the caves to fascinated residents of Carlsbad. He used pulleys, ropes and even a guano-harvesting mining bucket to lower people down into the depths of the caves. In 1923 the caverns were officially named Carlsbad Caverns. Two years later in 1925 the caverns were declared a national monument. After 1925, a staircase was built from the entrance to the Bat Cave to make it safer for visitors to go down into the caverns. Eventually paths, stairs and even elevators would be installed in the caves. In 1972 the entire cave was opened to guided tours. In 1986 even more passageways were discovered. As of 2005, the cave has been found to extend more than 110 miles beyond what was previously thought. There is still much exploring to be done. Jim White died in Carlsbad at the age of 63 in He is credited as the discoverer of the caves and is often called “Mr. Carlsbad Caverns.” Throughout his life he explored, guided and promoted the sharing of the caverns with the public.

17 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 17 How Limestone Caves are Formed What is Limestone? Limestone is a rock formed by sea animals of long ago like coral and shellfish. Pure limestone is white in color. Limestones of different colors have mixtures of sand and clay. How Limestone Caves are formed Limestone caves are formed out of limestone rocks. Limestone can only be dissolved in rainwater! As the rainwater falls, it enters tiny cracks in the rock. This creates even more cracks in the limestone. Over millions of years rainwater is constantly eroding the rock, forming caves. The longer the water has been eroding the rock, the larger the cave will be. Three Stages of Limestone Cave Formation Stage I During the first stage rainwater flows through tiny cracks in the limestone rock. The rainwater trickles down. A few cracks have been created because of the water pressure. The darkest shades show where limestone has been eroded. Stage II During stage two sink holes (large holes leading underground) are formed. Even more rainwater flows through the sink holes. The pressure of the flow creates spring water openings. The darkest shades now show that the rainwater has eroded large middle parts of the limestone rock. Stage III During stage three, more sink holes are formed. The darkest shades show that middle parts are still being eroded. Now the bottom part of the limestone rock is being eroded too. The entire dark shaded area is the cave. It continues to expand over many years as water keeps flowing. Cracks Tiny Cracks Limestone Begins to Erode Sink Holes Middle Parts Spring Water Openings Caverns Formed Bottom Eroding Sink Holes Spring Water Openings

18 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond toward RI.5.6 DOK 4 - ANN Analyze (compare and contrast) multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent (venn). toward RI.5.6 DOK 2 – ANp Categorize specific points from multiple accounts with similar points of view (no contrasting at this point, just comparing). 7. Which statement best explains the different purposes of the two passages Who is Jim White and How Limestone Caves are Formed? A.The reader can learn how limestone caves were created by rainwater. B.The reader can learn how limestone caves are formed over millions of years and can have many rooms and corridors. C.The reader can learn about a man who explored Carlsbad Caverns and how rainwater creates limestone caves over time. D.The reader can learn how dangerous cave exploring can be and how farmers used bat guano for fertilizer Based on the passages How Limestone Caves are Formed and Who Was Jim White, how do we know the formation of Carlsbad Caverns took millions of years? A.Scientists have discovered how old Carlsbad Caverns really are. B.Jim White discovered that Carlsbad Caverns had huge underground rooms. C.The longer rainwater has been eroding an area of limestone underground, the larger the caverns will be. D.Limestone is formed by sea animals like coral and shellfish which existed long ago. 6 7

19 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What might be the reason the two passages Three Stages of Limestone Cave Formation and Who Was Jim White, were paired together? A.Both passages explain the creation of limestone rock. B.Both passages provide examples of cave exploration. C.Both passages help students gain an understanding of how caves are formed. D.Both passages approach limestone caves from different perspectives. 9. What is the main purpose of the illustrations shown in the Three Stages of Limestone Cave Formation? A.The illustrations show how rainwater dissolves limestone. B.The illustrations help the reader to see what caves look like at each of the three stages of formation. C.The illustrations show how rainwater flows through the tiny cracks of the limestone rock. D.The illustrations help the reader to understand that caves can take millions of years to form. toward RI.5.6 DOK 4 - SYV Synthesize specific points across multiple texts on the same event or topic to articulate a new perspective. 8 toward RI.5.7 DOK 1 - CF Answer specific who, what, when, where or how questions about information found in digital or print sources. 9

20 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond toward RI.5.7 DOK 2 – APn Using text features efficiently as a guide, to obtain and interpret information found in multiple print or digital sources toward RI.5.7 DOK 2 – CL Locate specific information in appropriate multiple print or digital sources Which statement explains when the middle part of the limestone rock first begins to erode? A.Rainwater enters the tiny cracks of the limestone rock. B.The middle part of the cave continues to expand. C.Pressure from spring water allows even more rainwater to flow into the limestone. D.The cave continues to expand over millions of years Which illustration and text detail from How Limestone Care are Formed, would best help a reader to understand why caves keep expanding? A.Stage I Illustration and details found in the paragraph What is Limestone? B.Stage II Illustration and details found in the paragraph, How Limestone Caves are Formed C.Stage III Illustration and details found in the paragraph, How Limestone Caves are Formed D.Stage III Illustration and details found in the paragraph What is Limestone? 11

21 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Which specific points in How Limestone Caves are Formed and Who was Jim White, are similar? Which are different? Give examples from both passages. ( RI.7)

22 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Read the paragraph below. (Write and Revise W.5.2a-b) There are more than 118 known large caves inside Carlsbad Caverns. They are some of the biggest and longest caves in the world. Visitors often take pictures of the caves. One large cave chamber, the Big Room, is almost 4,000 feet long. It is the third largest chamber in North America and the seventh largest in the world. A student is revising this paragraph and needs to take out information that does not support the main idea of this paragraph. Which of the following sentences does not support the main idea of the paragraph? A They are some of the biggest and longest caves in the world. B. Visitors often take pictures of the caves. C. One large cave chamber, the Big Room, is almost 4,000 feet long. D. It is the third largest chamber in North America and the seventh largest in the world.

23 Rev. Control: 11/15/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Read the sentence below. (Write and Revise L.5.2.b) Inside the cave was well lit and had stairs. Which sentence shows where the comma should be placed?, A. Inside the cave, was well lit and had stairs., B. Inside the cave was well lit, and had stairs., C. Inside the, cave was well lit and had stairs.., D. Inside, the cave was well lit and had stairs Read the sentences below. (L.5.3a) The moon does not have an atmosphere. There is no wind to blow the footprints away. Which is the correct way to combine the two sentences? A. The moon does not have an atmosphere so there is no wind to blow the footprints away. B. Since the moon does not have an atmosphere, there is no wind to blow the footprints away. C.The moon does not have an atmosphere and there is no wind to blow the footprints away. D.The moon does not have an atmosphere because there is no wind to blow the footprints away.

24 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 24 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions!

25 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Standard RI5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, and problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts. DOK 2 - APn I can use text structures to find information. DOK 3 - APx I can find information by selecting the correct text structure. DOK 4 - SYu I can compare and contrast examples from different text structures to support an answer. DOK 2 – ANp I can find the same points from multiple accounts with similar points of view. DOK 4 - ANN I can compare and contrast similarities and differences in multiple accounts of the same event or topic. Standard RI5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. DOK 1 - Cf I can answer specific questions about the same topic or event from multiple accounts. DOK 1 - CF I can answer specific questions about information found in digital or print sources. DOK 4 - SYV I can compare specific points from multiple texts about the same topic to develop a new idea about the topic. DOK 2 – APn I use text features to obtain and interpret information found in multiple print or digital sources Standard RI5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently DOK 2 – CL I can locate specific information in appropriate multiple print or digital sources. Name _________________ Color the happy face green if your answer was correct or red if your answer was incorrect. Quarter Two Pre-Assessment for Informational Text – Important Adjustment Points Color your score blue What specific points in How Limestone Caves are Formed and Who was Jim White, are similar? Which points are different? Give examples from both passages Compare the paragraphs in The American Revolutionary War. Describe at least two different text structures the author uses. Give examples from the text Write and Revise Write and Revise questions are components of constructed response preparation W.5.2.a Read the paragraph. What sentence does not belong? L.5.3.a Combine two sentences into one. L.5.2.b Select the sentence that shows the correct placement of the comma.

26 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond


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