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Milton High School Environmental Studies Limestone Run Assessment December 12 th,2001.

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Presentation on theme: "Milton High School Environmental Studies Limestone Run Assessment December 12 th,2001."— Presentation transcript:

1 Milton High School Environmental Studies Limestone Run Assessment December 12 th,2001

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3 Environmental Studies Class Gary Sassaman Dwight Eberhart Gary Sassaman Dwight Eberhart Chase Satteson Nate Chamberlin Chase Satteson Nate Chamberlin Chris Buck Derek Rabuck Chris Buck Derek Rabuck Josh Allen Chuck Coup Josh Allen Chuck Coup Matt Swallow Amanda Herman Matt Swallow Amanda Herman Matt Orso Jason Shutt Matt Orso Jason Shutt Scott Coup Scott Coup Ryan Kelchner Ryan Kelchner Randy Kramm Randy Kramm Levi Yoder Levi Yoder

4 Growing Greener Grant

5 Limestone Run Watershed The watershed is 11.6 sq. miles. The watershed is 11.6 sq. miles. The stream is ten miles long. The stream is ten miles long. Most of watershed is open agricultural land. Most of watershed is open agricultural land. Routes 80 and 147 run through it and 254 parallels the creek. Routes 80 and 147 run through it and 254 parallels the creek.

6 Trout Unlimited’ s Description of Limestone Run “ This small stream has a mouth watering name but in reality it’s not at all appealing. There is limestone under the stream, and in some places there is the right aquatic weed ; however, this stream could be a case study titled “cattle and there effect.” There is no shade, the banks have been beaten down, it’s muddy, it is warm, and as it is now, has nothing to recommend it.” “ This small stream has a mouth watering name but in reality it’s not at all appealing. There is limestone under the stream, and in some places there is the right aquatic weed ; however, this stream could be a case study titled “cattle and there effect.” There is no shade, the banks have been beaten down, it’s muddy, it is warm, and as it is now, has nothing to recommend it.”

7 Problems With Limestone Run On the 303d list On the 303d list Erosion and Sedimentation Erosion and Sedimentation High Nitrate Levels High Nitrate Levels Lack of Riparian Buffers Lack of Riparian Buffers

8 Past Activities In 1991 the class started doing water testing. In 1991 the class started doing water testing. From they continued doing watershed treatment. From they continued doing watershed treatment. Form the class picked up the “Watershed Concept.” Form the class picked up the “Watershed Concept.” In the class also made it’s ten year plan. In the class also made it’s ten year plan.

9 Goals Fish Return Fish Return Reduce Flooding Reduce Flooding Reduce Sediment Reduce Sediment Reduce Nutrients Reduce Nutrients Reduce Temp. Reduce Temp. Repair Stream bank Repair Stream bank Increase Dissolved Oxygen Increase Dissolved Oxygen Create A Riparian Buffer Create A Riparian Buffer

10 Timeline Beginning if ten year plan Beginning if ten year plan Coalition Coalition Assessment Assessment Trout Return Trout Return Experimental Hatchery Experimental Hatchery

11 Stream Hydraulics - Pattern - Pattern - Dimension - Dimension - Profile

12 Pattern The Sinuosity of the Creek. The Sinuosity of the Creek.

13 Dimension Cross Sectional Profile Cross Sectional Profile

14 Profile Longitudinal Flow of Stream Longitudinal Flow of Stream

15 Things that effect Pattern, Dimension and Profile. Depth Depth Slope Slope Width Width Velocity Velocity Flow Resistance Flow Resistance Sediment Size Sediment Size Sediment Load Sediment Load Stream Discharge Stream Discharge

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17 Environmental Studies Budget & Equipment By: Scott Coup, Ryan Kelchner,& Randy Kramm

18 Grants The Environmental Studies class received two grants. The Environmental Studies class received two grants. - Growing Greener Grant - John G. Clark, Jr. Environmental Education Grant given by Merrill W. Linn Land and Waterways Conservancy

19 Grants Growing Greener Grant Growing Greener Grant - The Growing Greener Grant provides the Environmental Studies class with $23, It is good for 2 years. - The Grant calls for us to access 8 miles of Limestone Run.

20 John G. Clark Jr. Environmental Educational Grant John G. Clark Jr. Environmental Educational Grant - The Linn Conservancy Grant of $486 provided funds to buy two tidbits and an optic shuttle. -The equipment will help the Environmental Studies class to collect data on the fluctuating water temperature of Limestone Run.

21 Budget for the Growing Greener Grant 1. Sponsor Salaries/Benefits $1, Equipment and Supplies $11, Contractual $5, Construction (Stream bank fencing) $6, Total $23,920

22 Equipment 1 Lap Top Computer $3, Lap Top Computer $3, Digital Camcorder$ Digital Camcorder$ Digital Camera$ Digital Camera$ GPS/GIS Receivers$ GPS/GIS Receivers$ Hip Chains$ Hip Chains$ ft Tape Measure$ ft Tape Measure$ ft Tape Measure$ ft Tape Measure$ Waders$ Waders$210.00

23 Equipment/Continued 4 Stowaway tidbits $ Stowaway tidbits $ Base Station/ Coupler Kit$ Base Station/ Coupler Kit$ Optic Shuttle$ Optic Shuttle$ Safety Glasses$ Safety Glasses$ Armored Thermometer $ Armored Thermometer $ (100/box) Latex Gloves$ (100/box) Latex Gloves$ Boxcar 3.6 Starter Kit$ Boxcar 3.6 Starter Kit$ Tuff Stuff Flagging Tape$ Tuff Stuff Flagging Tape$3.20

24 Equipment/Continued 1 Kick Net with poles$ Kick Net with poles$ ” Forceps$ ” Forceps$ /pk Wide Storage Bottles$ /pk Wide Storage Bottles$ Sledge Hammer$ Sledge Hammer$ Model BP3180(Pruners) $ Model BP3180(Pruners) $ Model RL Horizontal Laser $1, Model RL Horizontal Laser $1, Tripod $ Tripod $ Grade Rod 10 ths or inches$ Grade Rod 10 ths or inches$80.00

25 Equipment/Continued 1 Sensor for Laser w/bracket$ Sensor for Laser w/bracket$ ArcView GIS 3.2$ ArcView GIS 3.2$ Magellan GPS Map 330M$ Magellan GPS Map 330M$ Canon Camera & Accessories total Canon Camera & Accessories total$892.59

26 This is a list of all the basic tools and equipment that we use while out assessing Limestone Run. This is a list of all the basic tools and equipment that we use while out assessing Limestone Run.

27 Mapping Uses Uses Equipment Used Equipment Used Problems Problems

28 Uses Show Data Show Data Future Comparison Future Comparison

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30 Equipment GPS GPS Hip Chains Hip Chains ArcView ArcView

31 Problems Programs Do Not Interface Programs Do Not Interface Security Setting On school Computer Security Setting On school Computer

32 -Chuck Coup -Amanda Herman -Randy Kramm -Ryan Kelchner

33 THALWAG WATERS EDGE BANKFULL TOP OF BANK Left Bank Right Bank

34 POOL RIFFLE Bed Profile Water Level Bankfull Top of Bank

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36 Cross Sectional Profile Scott Coup Matt Swallow Josh Allen

37 Procedures for Cross Section Establish benchmarks on each side of the stream Pound one piece of rebar in at each benchmark Attach the tape measure to the rebar with spring clamps so that is stretches the width of the stream.

38 Level II Assessment -Cross Sections -Takes accurate measurements of the dimension of the physical properties of the creek -Cross Sections are used to find problems with the stream so we can repair the flaws

39 Limestone Run Restoration Project  Pebble Count  What do pebbles have to do with the stream?  How the pebbles affect the stream.

40 Pebble Count Pebbles affect the streams water speed. Pebbles affect the streams water speed. The rocks in the stream can either slow down the water speed or speed it up. The rocks in the stream can either slow down the water speed or speed it up. The bigger the rocks the slower the water. This is because the rocks cause resistance of the current The bigger the rocks the slower the water. This is because the rocks cause resistance of the current The smaller the rocks the faster the current can go. This is because the water has no resistance from rocks. The smaller the rocks the faster the current can go. This is because the water has no resistance from rocks.

41 Pebble Count The Pebbles also can fill up a stream bed which is a problem with some streams. The Pebbles also can fill up a stream bed which is a problem with some streams.

42 Pebble Count The Process The Process In a reach or part of a stream you go about every 100ft and measure 10 pebbles at the tip of you boot. In a reach or part of a stream you go about every 100ft and measure 10 pebbles at the tip of you boot.

43 Pebble Count The process /cont. The process /cont. When you pick up your first rock you measure the three longest axis of the pebble( length, height, width). Then you record those records. When you pick up your first rock you measure the three longest axis of the pebble( length, height, width). Then you record those records.

44 Stream Bank Assessment Chris Buck and Matt Orso

45 Introduction to Stream Bank Assessment We used the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Stream and Riparian Habitats Rapid Assessment Protocol. The Protocol is a comprehensive stream assessment and inventory protocol which incorporates riparian corridor and stream stability assessments. The protocol is for use for us to rapidly identify, assess, and prioritize stream corridor conditions within a watershed. The assessment only provides a relative ranking rather than a quantitive evaluation of magnitudes of change. The information gained will give us an idea of the potential problems but not identify cause and effect relationships influenced by factors located outside the assessment area. To figure out the main problem and cause and effect we would need to complete a more detailed assessment.

46 The Two Main Assessment Sections Stream stability Stream stability Bank Height Root Depth Root Density Bank Height Root Depth Root Density Bank Angle Surface Protection Bank Angle Surface Protection Aggrading Stream Beds Aggrading Stream Beds Degrading Stream Beds Degrading Stream Beds Riparian an In stream Habitat Assessment Riparian an In stream Habitat Assessment Instream Cover Epifaunal Pool Variability Instream Cover Epifaunal Pool Variability Shading Water Appearance Nutrient Enrichment Shading Water Appearance Nutrient Enrichment Bank Vegetation Riparian Vegetation Riparian Zone Bank Vegetation Riparian Vegetation Riparian Zone Nutrient Uptake Potential Nutrient Uptake Potential

47 Results RIHSSTOTAL 7 Springs Farm34943 Lidecker Hoover Cottner Hoover

48 Results RIH SS TOTAL Robert Pfleegor Davis Farm James Farm Catholic Pavilion 51/ Woods to 147 Bridge 159/

49 Chemical Testing Alkalinity Alkalinity Hardness Hardness pH pH Nitrates Nitrates Ammonia Ammonia Dissolved Oxygen Dissolved Oxygen Dissolved Carbon Dioxide Dissolved Carbon Dioxide Chloride Chloride Silica Silica

50 Alkalinity Refers to the capability of water to neutralize acid. Refers to the capability of water to neutralize acid. Alkalinity comes from the calcium and magnesium in the stream. Alkalinity comes from the calcium and magnesium in the stream. Preferred Alkalinity of fresh water streams: ppm Preferred Alkalinity of fresh water streams: ppm Our results between ppm out of the 6 sites we tested. Our results between ppm out of the 6 sites we tested.

51 Hardness Measure of positively charged metal ions in the water such as calcium, manganese, and iron. Measure of positively charged metal ions in the water such as calcium, manganese, and iron. The preferred level of Hardness in fresh water streams: ppm The preferred level of Hardness in fresh water streams: ppm Our results were between ppm. (6 Sites) Our results were between ppm. (6 Sites)

52 pH Measure of hydrogen concentrations in the water. Measure of hydrogen concentrations in the water. The preferred levels of pH in freshwater streams: The preferred levels of pH in freshwater streams: Our results were between: (6 Sites) Our results were between: (6 Sites)

53 Nitrates Come from the decay of organic materials and fertilizers that have drained into the stream. Come from the decay of organic materials and fertilizers that have drained into the stream. Preferred levels of nitrates in fresh water streams: less than 1ppm. Preferred levels of nitrates in fresh water streams: less than 1ppm. Our results were between (6 Sites) Our results were between (6 Sites)

54 Ammonia Waste product of metabolism Waste product of metabolism Found in streams, most likely from direct animal waste. Found in streams, most likely from direct animal waste. Preferred levels of ammonia in fresh water stream:.1-.15ppm Preferred levels of ammonia in fresh water stream:.1-.15ppm Our results were all less than 1ppm. (6 Sites) Our results were all less than 1ppm. (6 Sites)

55 Dissolved Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) Comes from the decay of organic materials. Comes from the decay of organic materials. Dissolved Carbon Dioxide makes respiration difficult for aquatic organisms. Dissolved Carbon Dioxide makes respiration difficult for aquatic organisms. Preferred levels of carbon dioxide: none measurable Preferred levels of carbon dioxide: none measurable Our results were between 2-15ppm. (6 Sites) Our results were between 2-15ppm. (6 Sites)

56 Dissolved Oxygen Amount of oxygen that is free and can be used by aquatic organisms Amount of oxygen that is free and can be used by aquatic organisms Preferred level of dissolved oxygen in fresh water streams: 6-10ppm Preferred level of dissolved oxygen in fresh water streams: 6-10ppm We did not get the opportunity to test dissolved oxygen at this time. We did not get the opportunity to test dissolved oxygen at this time.

57 Chloride May be from naturally occurring salt deposits in the earth or from industrial waste and sewage. May be from naturally occurring salt deposits in the earth or from industrial waste and sewage. Preferred levels is mg/L Preferred levels is mg/L Our results were 42-70mg/L. (6 Sites) Our results were 42-70mg/L. (6 Sites)

58 Silica Occurs naturally in streams Occurs naturally in streams Used by some aquatic organisms to build up their skeletal structure. Used by some aquatic organisms to build up their skeletal structure. Preferred levels of silica in fresh water streams: 10-20ppm Preferred levels of silica in fresh water streams: 10-20ppm Our results were 1-7ppm. (6 Sites) Our results were 1-7ppm. (6 Sites)

59 Biological Testing Josh Allen and Matt Swallow

60 Macroinvertabrate Testing  Location  Tools  Process  Results

61 Water Quality Rating SITESCORERATING > 40 > 40GOOD 1 and 2 1 and 2 (21.1, 21.6) FAIR < 20 < 20POOR

62 Index Created By: State Parks Watershed Education Macroinvertabrate Stream Assessment (Level 1) State Parks Watershed Education Macroinvertabrate Stream Assessment (Level 1)

63 Limestone Run Restoration Project What are the purposes for Riparian What are the purposes for Riparian Buffers and Stream Bank Fences? What is some of the Vegetation used for the Riparian Buffers? What is some of the Vegetation used for the Riparian Buffers? What will Riparian Buffers and Stream Bank Fences do for the environment? What will Riparian Buffers and Stream Bank Fences do for the environment?

64 Limestone Run Restoration Project Riparian Buffers Riparian Buffers –Purposes  Reduce soil erosion  Prevent excess nutrients-nitrogen and phosphorous  Provide necessary food, cover, and shade for wildlife  Hunters and Anglers enjoy a variety of game species  Unique learning opportunities (serve as outside classrooms)  Hikers and Campers enjoy the aesthetic qualities provide by a well-managed riparian zone

65 Limestone Run Restoration Project Riparian Buffers Riparian Buffers –Zone 1-  Matures forest along waters edge to maintain habitat, food, water temperature, and helps stabilize banks and remove nutrients. –Vegetation Requirements Red MapleBlack Maple Red MapleBlack Maple Silver MapleRed Ash Shad BushSweet-boy Magnolia Yellow BirchBlack Willow

66 Limestone Run Restoration Project Riparian Buffers Riparian Buffers –Zone 2 Vegetation  Zone 2 contains a managed forest. The primary function of Zone2 is to remove sediment, nutrients and other pollutants from surface and ground water. It also provides habitat and allows for economic benefits to the landowner from the forest resource. –White AshShrubs –Honey LocustBlack Walnut

67 Limestone Run Restoration Project Riparian Buffers Riparian Buffers –Zone 3 Vegetation  Zone 3 contains grass filter strips, level spreaders or other features which can slow runoff, infiltrate water and help filter sediment and its associated chemicals. –Tall Grasses

68 Limestone Run Restoration Project Stream bank Fencing Stream bank Fencing –Process used to help keep cattle out of the stream. –Reduces stream bank erosion. –Increases habitat for micro organisms. –Help protect the buffer along the edge of the stream bank.

69 Limestone Run Restoration Project What is CREP? What is CREP? What land is eligible for CREP, and what are the Price Ranges? What land is eligible for CREP, and what are the Price Ranges? What are some of the goals for CREP? What are some of the goals for CREP?

70 Limestone Run Restoration Project CREP CREP –A new program in PA started in June –A USDA program  Founded by state and non-profit partners –The Gov’t leases the land from the property owner for 15 yrs. –50’ on each side of the stream.

71 Limestone Run Restoration Project CREP CREP –Average Price per acre.  Northumberland Co. = $100-$115  Montour Co. is slightly higher. –Prices depend upon soil type and quality –Lowest price in North is Hv $88/acre. –Highest price in North is WsA $116/acre. –The soils for the land can be determined in the local soils book. –Goals of CREP.  Decrease soil erosion and runoff.  Improve water quality.  Improve wildlife and fisheries habitat.  Increase farm income on marginal land.


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