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Rocks are constantly undergoing changes; some rapid and others are gradual. There are three rock types which are based upon how they are formed: igneous,

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Presentation on theme: "Rocks are constantly undergoing changes; some rapid and others are gradual. There are three rock types which are based upon how they are formed: igneous,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Rocks are constantly undergoing changes; some rapid and others are gradual. There are three rock types which are based upon how they are formed: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. Rocks within each rock type are differentiated by their size, shape and texture. The Rock Cycle describes how the three rock types are related and are able to change from one type to another. How can the processes that change one form of rock into another be described ? Next Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at

2 Use the following sites to increase your knowledge regarding the processes which cause rocks to change over time. You will use the Rock Cycle Interactive to review the three types of rocks and to learn about the Rock Cycle. You will use the Rock Cycle Interactive to review the three types of rock and to learn about the Rock Cycle. Highlight the text. Listen and read along Next Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at Courtesy: National Science Foundation

3 In this investigation, you will: Click on the star that matches your assigned color to enter the website that you will be using for your investigation. Be sure to ask the teacher what color star you are today. All stars complete: a. Read the Introduction tab. b. Read the Types of Rocks tab. c. Read and click on animations In the How Rock Change tab. d. Explore the Rock Cycle Diagram tab. e. Complete Activity AActivity A f. Complete Activity BActivity B Next Figure 1: The Rock Cycle Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at

4 Next Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at You will complete Activities A –B in this document: AssessmentAssessment

5 Below are some additional sites to further develop your understanding of the Rock Cycle: All Stars BrainPOP Rock Cycle Animation(audio+visual) Rock Cycle Quiz Real World Applications: The Rock Cycle Geology and Building tunnels Formation of the Grand Canyon Next Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at

6 Teacher Notes: Objective: Students will be to analyze the rock cycle in order to describe the processes that change one form of rock into another Differentiation: All students complete the same class work and assessment and use the same web resource however they are divided into gold and silver star. Gold stars read the site without any assistance whereas for silver stars the site Time Management Strategies: It is suggested that this activity be completed over the course of two class periods. This activity could also be conducted in groups of two students. Technology Infusion: The students will need to be introduced to drop- down menus and entering the text into the enabled areas. Students should also be familiar with opening hyperlinks in both the documents and in the Power point presentation. The students should also be familiar with tabs (sheets in excel), entering text in boxes, clicking into boxes AVID Strategy: The following AVID strategies are supported in this lesson: inquiry based learning, quick write (reaction and analysis) and use of Costas and Bloom questioning. Learning Styles: Field Dependent, Field independent, Visual and Reflective Learners, Global Understanding Maryland State Curriculum Goal: Standard 2.0 Earth/Space Science: Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the chemical and physical interactions (i.e., natural forces and cycles, transfer of energy) of the environment, Earth, and the universe that occur over time. Topic A: Materials and Processes That Shape A Planet Indicator 1: Identify and describe that some changes in Earth's surface occur rapidly while other changes occur very slowly. Indicator 4. Differentiate among sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks based upon the processes by which they are formed. Objectives d. Cite features that can be used as evidence to distinguish among the three types of rocks and relate these features to the processes that form each rock type. e. Describe the processes that change one form of rock into another (rock cycle). Common Core Standards :Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects 6– Last update: May 2011 Created by Keishauna Banks BCPS Research Module or Slam Dunk Model, Copyright 2005, Baltimore County Public Schools, MD, all rights reserved. The models may be used for educational, non-profit school use only. All other uses, transmissions, and duplications are prohibited unless permission is granted expressly. This lesson is based on Jamie McKenzie’s Slam Dunk Lesson module available at Key Ideas and Details 1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts. Craft and Structure 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.


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