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"The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children.

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Presentation on theme: ""The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children."— Presentation transcript:

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2 "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.”

3 "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers. ATTRIBUTION: Attributed to SOCRATES by Plato, according to William L. Patty and Louise S. Johnson, Personality and Adjustment, p. 277 (1953)."

4 No universal definition of young people Ages – – 21 Children, Youth and Families Act 2005

5  "child" means—  (a) in the case of a person who is alleged to  have committed an offence, a person  who at the time of the alleged  commission of the offence was under  the age of 18 years but of or above the  age of 10 years but does not include  any person who is of or above the age  of 19 years when a proceeding for the  offence is commenced in the Court; and  (b) in any other case, a person who is under  the age of 17 years or, if a protection  order, a child protection order within  the meaning of Schedule 1 or an  interim order within the meaning of that  Schedule continues in force in respect  of him or her, a person who is under the  age of 18 years;

6  Population structure and change  According to the 2006 Census of Population and Housing, there were approximately 4 million children aged 0–14 years and 2.9 million young people aged 15–24 years living in Australia, representing 20% and 14% of the total Australian population respectively (Table 2.1). When combined, children and young people (0–24 year olds) accounted for one-third of the Australian population, or 6.9 million people. The number of males in the child and youth population aged 0–24 years was slightly higher than the number of females (3.6 million males compared with 3.4 million females). This is a reflection of more males being born than females (106 males born per 100 females in 2005) (ABS 2006a). This pattern differed for older age groups, with the ratio of males to females similar for 30–69 year olds, but for those aged 70 years or over the ratio of females to males was substantially higher in 2005 (132 females per 100 males), reflecting the higher life expectancy of females compared with males (ABS 2006b).

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8  Geographical distribution of children and young people  In 2006, one-third of Australian children and young people lived in New South Wales, one-quarter in Victoria and one-fifth in Queensland (Table 2.2). While only 1% of children and young people lived in the Northern Territory, they accounted for 40% of the territory’s total population. The relatively high proportion of children and young people in the Territory’s population is partly explained by the younger age profile of the Indigenous population, which makes up over half of the population in the Northern Territory.

9 NSWVicQldWASATasACTNT Austr alia (a) Number 0–14 years 1,332, , , , ,38 396,51562,56951,540 4,050, –24 years 928, , , , ,17 564,99054,19432,545 2,884,0 98 0–24 years 2,260,9 82 1,690,8 21 1,412, , , , ,76 384,085 6,934,2 41 Total population 6,817,1 82 5,128,3 10 4,091,5 46 2,059,0 45 1,568, , , , ,701, 488 Proportion of state or territory population (b) (per cent) 0–14 years –24 years –24 years Proportion of Australian population 0–24 years (c) (per cent) 0–24 years Table 2.2: Distribution of children and young people across the states and territories, June 2006 (a)Includes ‘Other Territories’ comprising Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. (b)The denominator is the relevant total state/territory population. (c)The denominator is the total Australian population aged 0–24 years. Source: ABS 2007a.

10  83/tribes x0.jpg

11  The tribes, from left: The Emo, The SuperGeek, The Jock Dolly, The Gangsta, The Punk Lite, The Glamazon, The Hipster, and The Techno Boho.  Activity  Summarise who they are – 1. thing that you would need to keep in mind to work with that group.

12  Worst part of being a teenager  Brainstorm stresses you experienced as a teenager  Think about what changes have happened socially that have changed the world of teenagers  Best part about being a teenager  What would you change in the world today to improve the lives of teenagers now?

13 “I’m ok how r u?” “~neva happenz~” “YOLO” PPL, IDC, IDGAF, LOL, LMFAO, L8, :D, XD

14  Me gusta – something nice  LOL  Rage face  Forever alone guy  Okay guy – accepted your lot in life  Troll face – to take liberties

15 Adolescent development Young people undergo many different changes as they go through adolescence and increasingly take on adult roles and responsibilities.  These changes include physical changes, as well as changes to their thought processes and emotions (cognitive and emotional changes), sense of identity and values (psychological changes), relationships (social changes), and realistic aspirations for the future. All young people are unique and therefore the degree, rate and pace of specific physical, emotional and social changes varies with each young person.

16 Adolescence is characterised by rapid change in several areas:  Physical development  Psychological development  Cognitive development  Emotional development  Social development

17  this is often the most obvious set of changes in a young person as they grow and develop their adult physical characteristics.

18  Growth spurt also involves weight and height gain – boys develop more muscles and girls develop more fat  Heart and lungs increase in size and heart rate drops in both sexes (stronger change for boys)  Growth hormone initiates the secretion of other hormones - Adrenal androgen promotes secondary sexual characteristics in girls - Oestrogen governs the menstrual cycle and breast development (minor role in males) - Testosterone promotes growth of secondary sexual characteristics in boys (minor role in females)

19 Girls  Growth of breasts8-13  Pubic hair grows8-14  Height spurt9-15  Menarche Boys  Growth of testes10-14  Pubic hair grows10-15  Height spurt11-16  Growth of penis/change of voice/ facial hair

20 GirlsBoys Early puberty is associated with; Negative body image Early sexual experience Trouble at home and school Depression Late puberty is associated with; Negative body image Trouble at home and school Fewer friends What kinds of social influences might be contributing to these effects in Australian society?

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23 Some of the most significant psychological changes relate to the development of autonomy and independent identity. This often leads to the challenging of decisions and actions that they may have previously accepted, and often the discovering of new boundaries as they work to create their own identity.  Brainstorm how previous generations have expressed this stage.

24 T he concrete thinking of childhood begins to move to more complex abstract thinking. Skills such as planning, prioritising, organising thoughts, suppressing impulses, problem solving and weighing consequences are developing and influencing the decision making process in young people.  Read hand out  Discuss

25 W ith lots of changes in thinking comes a range of emotions that the young person may not have experienced in the same way previously. While the young person is developing their own self identity it is understandable that in this process they may experience more moodiness, irritability, and frustration, however again, as there skills develop, their ability to manage these fluctuating emotions becomes more advanced. These changes also see the young person developing a greater sense of empathy, shifting from a focus of being self centred to now understanding more about the experiences of others.

26 While children generally see the family as an integral part of their life, many young people, while continuing to value the role of support of their family, begin to rely more heavily on the support and guidance provided by their friends. In addition, they may also begin to seek out intimate relationships.

27  Intensifies the social pressure to conform to gender stereotypes and decreases gender flexibility  Behavioural correlates to gender intensification are; - susceptibility to anxiety (more self conscious) - Social relationships change – mothers show increasing deference to sons but not daughters after puberty, fathers may distance themselves from sexually mature daughters, girls tend to develop more intimate friendships that boys during adolescence. - Risk taking behaviour is more likely to be demonstrated, girls are more likely to experience stronger parental protectiveness

28  Some conflict with parents is probably necessary for growth of a separate identity  Beliefs are usually consistent with parents on big issues (religion, marriage, morals, etc)  Inconsistent with parents on superficials like; dress, manners, social behaviour.  Increased identification with the peer group – gives a sense of security and identity apart from the family.  - creates opportunities to practice belonging to a social network

29 The main development tasks that occur are:  independence from parents and other adults  development of a realistic stable positive self-identity  formation of sexual identity  negotiation of peer and intimate relationships  development of realistic body image  formulation of their own moral/value system  acquisition of skills for future economic independence  With adolescence/young adulthood, comes a significant time of change and development. The onset of mental health problems at this time of life can therefore have significant impact on the development of important life skills if left untreated.


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