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Managing Challenging Behaviour Produced as part of the Partnership Development Schools (PDS) Strategy Phase 3 2008-09 (Lead PDS: The Park Community School.

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Presentation on theme: "Managing Challenging Behaviour Produced as part of the Partnership Development Schools (PDS) Strategy Phase 3 2008-09 (Lead PDS: The Park Community School."— Presentation transcript:

1 Managing Challenging Behaviour Produced as part of the Partnership Development Schools (PDS) Strategy Phase (Lead PDS: The Park Community School. Contact Chris Ley

2 Overview  Society and it’s views, the wider context.  Interesting facts and stats.  What do students need?  What can teachers do?  Types of challenging behaviour  How do we deal with it?  Confrontation and anger.  A ‘way out’.  De-escalation  Positive handling.  Role play.  Keep a sense of perspective!

3 Wider Context  The demonisation of youth in society today by some areas of the media has created tension. Hoodies, gangs, knife crime, binge drinking and drugs is the image some purvey as the norm. Is this fair?

4 Some interesting facts!  Behavioural difficulties are not increasing. (Elton Report 1989) However:  Exclusions in 1990/91 were 2,910  Exclusions in 1995/96 were 12,000  This may contradict the findings of the Elton Report.

5 More interesting facts!  Behaviour is satisfactory or better at over 90% of schools.  Attendance is at a record high of 93%  Permanent exclusions are over 20% lower than in (Jacqui Smith MP 2005)

6 Reassuring FACT!!  The fact is that the majority of pupils are well behaved most of the time (Jacqui Smith MP 2005)

7 What do students need?  A structured, positive environment.  Teacher who is good role model, firm, fair, knowledgeable and in charge!  To feel safe from embarrassment, humiliation and unfair criticism.  Be treated with dignity and respect.  Interesting lessons.  To be involved. (not taught ‘at’)  Decent equipment, resources.

8 What should teachers do?  Establish reasonable rules and procedures  Explain rationale for rules  Have clear fair logical consequences  Provide structure and routine  Interesting lessons  Be positive and reinforce good behaviour  Use humour where appropriate  Have high expectations

9 The ways challenging behaviour may manifest.  Swearing at teacher  Shouting out  Rocking back on chair  Refusal to follow request  Arguing  Fiddling with mobile/ipod etc  Throwing things  Leaving room  Non eye contact  Tapping, scraping, muttering etc

10 How do you deal with it?!  Ensure that you know your schools behaviour policy and what sanctions are available for you. Including things like T.O.R, isolation, detention, report cards and any other procedures used. Use these things consistently!

11 Confrontation and anger.  Preventative measures should limit the amount of confrontation you will be involved in, but inevitably, every so often, it will happen. Remain calm and firm, and separate the behaviour from the child. For example, “I have a a lot of time for you Billy, but you cannot use your phone in class, and you know that” or “I like you, but I don’t like being sworn at”

12 Give pupils a way out  Try to avoid backing pupils into a corner to get what you want, especially in front of their peers.  Let them talk to you, and listen. Then expect them to do the same, as you have just modelled.

13 De-escalation  As the professional, you will often see a situation starting to escalate in the classroom. Acting early may prevent a big disruption to your lesson. Stay calm, maybe tactically ignore smaller transgressions to deal with the ensuing explosion! Often a small interaction with the parties involved, sometimes not even verbal, will be enough.

14 Positive Handling  What the law says:  School staff can use such force as is reasonable in the circumstances to prevent a pupil from doing, or continuing to do, any of the following:  Committing any offence (or, for a pupil under the age of criminal responsibility, what would be an offence for an older pupil);  Causing personal injury to, or damage to the property of, any person (including the pupil him/herself); or  Prejudicing the maintenance of good order and discipline at the school or among any pupils receiving education at the school, whether during a teaching session or otherwise.

15 Role Play: Personal Space  In 2’s. One sat down, partner on opposite side of room.  Walk slowly towards partner. Partner to shout stop when uncomfortable.  Now walking and shouting. Shout stop when uncomfortable.  Use of levels and tone of voice when talking to pupils.

16 Have a sense of perspective!  All teachers naturally think that their subject is the most important and that the homework they set is the priority. It is worth remembering that pupils are people, and some have more stable lives than others. Be understanding and be yourself!


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