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Dynamic Response of Pedestrian Bridges/Floor Vibration and Various Methods of Vibration Remediation Chung C. Fu, Ph.D., P.E.

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Presentation on theme: "Dynamic Response of Pedestrian Bridges/Floor Vibration and Various Methods of Vibration Remediation Chung C. Fu, Ph.D., P.E."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dynamic Response of Pedestrian Bridges/Floor Vibration and Various Methods of Vibration Remediation Chung C. Fu, Ph.D., P.E.

2 Presentation Brief overview of structural vibration Understanding how people perceive and react to unwanted vibration General response of pedestrian bridges to vibration Various design guidelines Damping Bridge case study

3 Structural Vibration Stiffness Force: F S = -kx Damping Force: F D = -cx’ External Force: F E (t) Inertial Force

4 Structural Vibration General equation of motion

5 Structural Vibration Free Vibration Solution

6 Structural Vibration Forced Vibration Solution

7 Structural Vibration Steady State Forcing Function Solution

8 Human Perception Human Response –Present: Not perceived –Perceived: Does not annoy –Perceived: Annoys and disturbs –Perceived: Severe enough to cause illness Peak acceleration limits SituationBuilding in Strong Wind Public Transportation Building in Earthquake Amusement Park Ride Peak Acceleration (% g)0.5 – 1051 – – 458<458

9 Peak Acceleration for Human Comfort for Vibrations Design Guide 11 Fig. 2.1 Recommended peak acceleration for human comfort for vibrations due to human activities

10 Pedestrian Bridge Response Vertical Vibration Lateral Vibration

11 Pedestrian Bridge Response Vertical Vibration (also apply to floor vibration) P = Person’s weight  i = Dynamic coefficient for the harmonic force i = Harmonic multiple (1, 2, 3…) f step = Step frequency of activity t = time  i = Phase angle for the harmonic

12 Pedestrian Bridge Response Lateral Vibration Synchronous Lateral Excitation

13 Design Guidelines Serviceability (i.e. functional, usable) –Stiffness –Resonance Resonance –Frequency matching –Uncomfortable/damaging vibration –Unfavorable perception AVOID RESONACE!

14 Design Guidelines Natural Frequency Ex.) Uniformly loaded simple beam:

15 Design Guidelines Natural Frequency (Vertical Vibration) –Limiting values (Bridge) AASHTO –f > 3.0 Hz –f > 2.85ln(180/W) –W > 180e -0.35f –Special cases: f > 5.0 Hz British Code (1978 BS 5400)/Ontario Bridge Code (1983) –f o > 5.0 Hz –a max < 0.5(f o ) 1/2 m/s 2 –a max = 4   f o 2 y s K  –F = 180sin(2  f o T) N –v t = 0.9f o m/s (> 2.5 m/s per Ontario Code)

16 Bridge Design Guidelines

17 British Design Guidelines

18 Design Guidelines Natural Frequency (Vertical Vibration) –Limiting values –AASHTO –British Code (1978 BS 5400) –AISC/CISC Steel Design Guide Series 11 < 1.5% (Indoor walkways) < 5.0% (Outdoor bridges)

19 Response to Sinusoidal Force Resonance response function a/g, a 0 /g= ratio of the floor acceleration to the acceleration of gravity; acceleration limit f n = natural frequency of floor structure P o = constant force equal to 0.29 kN (65 lb.) for floors and 0.41 kN (92 lb.) for footbridges Simplified design criterion

20 Steel Framed Floor System The combined Beam or joist and girder panel system – Spring in parallel (a & b) or in series (c & d) System frequency Equivalent panel weight

21 Design Guidelines Natural Frequency (Lateral Vibration) –Step frequency ½ vertical –1996 British Standard BS % vertical load –Per ARUP research f > 1.3 Hz –Rule of thumb Lateral limits ½ vertical limits

22 Design Guidelines Stiffening –Uneconomical –Unsightly Damping –Inherent damping < 1% –Mechanical damping devices

23 Damping Coulomb Damping

24 Damping Viscous Damping Welded steel, prestressed concrete, well detailed reinforced concrete <  < 0.03 Reinforced concrete with considerable cracking <  < 0.05

25 Damping Mechanical dampers –Active dampers (not discussed here) Expensive Complicated No proven examples for bridges (prototypes currently being tested for seismic damping)

26 Damping Mechanical dampers –Passive dampers Viscous Dampers Tuned Mass Dampers (TMDs) Viscoelastic Dampers Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLDs)

27 Damping Viscous Dampers

28 Damping Viscous Dampers

29 Dampers Tuned mass damper Ex) Consider mass ratio = 0.01  s = 0.05 (5% damping)

30 Dampers Viscoelastic Dampers

31 Dampers Tuned Liquid Dampers

32 Case Study: Millennium Bridge Crosses River Thames, London, England 474’ main span, 266’ north span, 350’ south span Superstructure supported by lateral supporting cables (7’ sag) Bridge opened June 2000, closed 2 days later

33 Millennium Bridge Severe lateral resonance was noted (0.25g) Predominantly noted during 1 st mode of south span (0.8 Hz) and 1 st and 2 nd modes of main span (0.5 Hz and 0.9 Hz) Occurred only when heavily congested Phenomenon called “Synchronous Lateral Excitation”

34 Millennium Bridge Possible solutions –Stiffen the bridge Too costly Affected aesthetic vision of the bridge –Limit pedestrian traffic Not feasible –Active damping Complicated Costly Unproven –Passive damping

35 Millennium Bridge Passive Dampers –37 viscous dampers installed –19 TMDs installed

36 Millennium Bridge Results –Provided 20% critical damping. –Bridge was reopened February, –Extensive research leads to eventual updating of design code.


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