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Helpful Tips from a RAMP Reviewer FSCA Conference Friday, October 24, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Helpful Tips from a RAMP Reviewer FSCA Conference Friday, October 24, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Helpful Tips from a RAMP Reviewer FSCA Conference Friday, October 24, 2014

2 RAMP by the Numbers Process: 113 applications 72 total RAMP schools from 18 states Total RAMP schools since 2003: 545 schools from 36 states

3 RAMP Schools by Level

4 Where Do I Begin?

5

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7 Helpful Tips Review the RAMP rubric carefully. Be very familiar with the RAMP application process. Remember, this is about the school counseling program, not about the school counselors. Ensure the application covers one full school year.

8 Helpful Tips Proofread!! Ensure the application is clear and understandable from someone unfamiliar with your program. Use the narratives effectively to tell the story of your school counseling program. The school counseling program goals are the threads that tie the application together!!

9 3. School Counseling Program Goals The school counseling program goals give focus to the school counseling program. They define how the vision and mission are accomplished and guide the development of curriculum, small-group and closing-the-gap action plans. The program goals: 1. Promote achievement, attendance, behavior and/or school safety 2. Are based on school data 3. May address school-wide data, policies and practices or address closing-the- gap issues 4. Address academic, career and/or personal/social development (there doesn’t have to be a goal for each domain, but your goal must address at least one of the domains) 5. Are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, results-oriented, time-bound See pages of “The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs (third edition)” for more information. Narrative: The narrative addresses how the goals were developed, how they address student learning and/or student inequalities, and how they are founded in data.

10 SMART GOALS Specific – outcome is clear; intensity of focus is on students Measurable – you can count it or see it Attainable – reachable; you have the resources/tools to make it happen Results-oriented – student-centered; aligned with school and district goals Time Bound – a specific date has been set for it to be accomplished

11 Sample School Counseling Program SMART Goals Worksheet (from ASCA National Model, 3 rd edition, pg. 28) Specific Issue What is the specific issue based on our school’s data? Where do you find school and student data? Do you have easy access? Have you looked at your school improvement plan? What specific sub-group of students needs your intervention to close a particular gap? Measurable How will we measure the effectiveness of the interventions? Refer to Making Data Work, 3 rd Edition for excellent help on working with data and how to calculate percent change Attainable What outcome would stretch us but is still attainable? Be realistic! Results-Oriented Is the goal reported in results-oriented data (process, perception, and outcome)? Refer to ASCA National Model, 3 rd Edition, pg. 102 Time Bound When will we accomplish our goal? Consider when new data will be available.

12 DIRECTIONGROUPDATE ELEMENT DESIRED OUTCOME BY WHEN Increase or decrease? Who will be your target group? What data element are you trying to impact? What is your target goal? What are you trying to achieve? Specify your target date Are you trying to increase or decrease a data element for a particular target group? Data by student groups: Race/ethnicity Gender Grade SES Status ESE/ELL/other subgroups Examples of data elements: Attendance Graduation rate Promotion/retention Tardies Discipline referrals GPA SAT/ACT scores Suspension rates Over-age students What is the realistic goal you are trying to achieve based on your knowledge of current numbers? What is the percentage of change you are trying to achieve? Example: DECREASE2 nd GRADE BOYSDISCIPLINE REFERRALS20%END OF SCHOOL YEAR

13 Does it Meet SMART Criteria? Decrease the number of 2 nd grade boys who receive discipline referrals by 20% by the end of the school year. Specific? Measurable? Attainable? Results-oriented? Time Bound?

14 Does it Meet SMART Criteria? Improve the self-concept of students through classroom visits and small group counseling. Specific? Measurable? Attainable? Results-oriented? Time Bound?

15 Does it Meet SMART Criteria? Reduce the number of core subject failing grades by 50%. Specific? Measurable? Attainable? Results-oriented? Time Bound?

16 Does it Meet SMART Criteria? Seventh-grade students identified with two or more D/F grades in the first marking period will increase their GPA by 35% by the end of the first semester. Specific? Measurable? Attainable? Results-oriented? Time Bound?

17 Another SMART Goal Format By ______________________, _______________________________ will (end date) (identified students) increase/decrease ______________________________ by_____________. (specific achievement, attendance, or behavior) (measure of change)

18 Examples By June, 2015, identified 9 th grade students with a GPA of 2.0 or lower in October, 2014, will increase their GPA by 1 point. In May, 2015, 75% of 3 rd grade students with 2014 failing state assessment scores in Reading will pass to the next grade. By June, 2015, students with 5 or more absences in the first marking period of the school year will reduce their number of absences in the last marking period by 50%. By June, 2015, the percent of 7 th grade students in the red zone in November 2014 will decrease by 40%.

19 Joni Shook Lead RAMP Reviewer


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