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© 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Chapter 4: Main Idea PowerPoint by JoAnn Yaworski and Mimi Markus Bridging the Gap, 8/e Brenda.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Chapter 4: Main Idea PowerPoint by JoAnn Yaworski and Mimi Markus Bridging the Gap, 8/e Brenda."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Chapter 4: Main Idea PowerPoint by JoAnn Yaworski and Mimi Markus Bridging the Gap, 8/e Brenda Smith

2 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman In this Chapter You Will Learn about:  Topic  Main Idea  Supporting Details  Summaries

3 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman What Is a Topic? A topic is a word, name, or phrase that labels the subject but does not reveal the specific contents of the passage.  Similar to a title  General term, rather than specific  Unifies details

4 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Example of a Topic Topic Vegetables Details Carrots Lettuce Onions Potatoes

5 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman What Is the Main Idea?  Contains the central message  Condenses thoughts and details into a general statement  Is all-inclusive of the author’s point

6 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Other Names for Main Idea  Main point  Central point  Gist  Controlling idea  Central thought  Thesis

7 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman What Are Supporting Details?  Support, develop, and explain a main idea  Include: –Reasons –Incidents –Facts –Examples –Steps –Definitions

8 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Major and Minor Details Major Main Support ideas Explain Describe Minor MajorSupport DetailsExplain Describe

9 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Importance of Prior Knowledge in Main Idea Familiar with Subject  Main idea is effortless  Main idea is automatic  No information overload Unfamiliar with Subject  Unfamiliar words  Confusing  Unable to make predictions

10 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman “Informed” Expert Reader  Strategy 1 –Preview –Predict  Strategy 2 –Summarize or reduce information –Stop and reflect

11 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman “Uninformed” Expert Readers  Strategy 1 –Read the material –Decide on a Ttopic –Create a main idea statement  Strategy 2  Read the material  Review for key terms and concepts  Create main idea statement  Strategy 3 –Read the material –Propose a main idea statement –Revise the main idea statement

12 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Steps to Determine Main Idea Familiar Material 1. Determine topic 2. Identify key terms 3. Find main idea Unfamiliar Material 1. Identify key terms 2. Determine topic 3. Find main idea

13 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Stated Main Idea  Main point directly stated  Provides overview of material  Called topic sentence or thesis statement

14 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Location of Stated Main Ideas  Beginning, middle, or end of a paragraph  Beginning and concluding sentences of passage can be combined for main idea statement

15 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Find Unstated Main Ideas  Determine general topic  Determine what the key terms suggest  Create main idea sentence that brings concepts together

16 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Getting Main Idea of Longer Selections  Think about significance of title  Read first paragraph or two for statement of topic or thesis  Read subheadings and first sentences of paragraphs  Look for clues that indicate how material is organized  Determine how subsections and overall organization relates to whole

17 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman What Is a Summary? A summary is a condensed version of a passage. It consists of brief, concise statements of the main idea and the significant supporting details.

18 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Why Summarize?  For textbook study  For anticipating answers for essay exam questions  For writing research papers

19 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Summary Writing: A Main Idea Skill  First sentence states main idea or thesis  Remaining sentences include significant details  Minor details are omitted  Transition words and phrases show relationship between points  Summary is shorter than the material being summarized  Personal opinion is omitted  Paragraph form is used

20 © 2005 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Longman Visit the Longman English Pages  http://www.ablongman.com/englishpages Take a Road Trip to the Maine Woods, the St. Louis Arch, and Ellis Island! Be sure to visit the Main Idea and Supporting Details modules in your Reading Road Trip CD-ROM for multimedia tutorials, exercises, and tests.


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