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Orienteering. What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their.

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Presentation on theme: "Orienteering. What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their."— Presentation transcript:

1 Orienteering

2 What is Orienteering?

3 Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. From the Boy Scout merit badge manual, 2003

4 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. Over hill and dale, through the woods…

5 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. This is a timed event But how fast you go is a personal choice.

6 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. Folks of all ages, both genders, every walk of life. Alone or in groups. Of all fitness levels and abilities.

7 Suitable for all Ages

8 As Competitive as You Want

9 Alone or in a Group

10 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. A specially prepared map In accordance with IOF mapping standards With selected features enhancing foot navigation

11 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. You must have a amp to Orienteer You do not have to have a compass; although it is a valuable aid. Special compasses are made for Orienteering.

12 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. Selecting a route suitable to your abilities (Physical and mental) Following that route, and making improvements and corrections along the way, in order to optimize your overall speed.

13 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. The area between two checkpoints is evaluated for alternative routes. One is selected. Orienteering techniques are implemented along the way.

14 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. The Orienteering Controls are marked with a distinct red & white kite like flag. A unique punch or electronic recording device proves you arrived at each location.

15 What is Orienteering? Orienteering is a cross country race in which participants use a highly detailed map and a compass to navigate their way between checkpoints along an unfamiliar course. A course is a series of checkpoints with controls, visited in order. No prior knowledge of the course layout, and frequently the map is permitted in competitive orienteering.

16 Types of Orienteering Cross Country Done in order – Route Choice USOF – sub classes – Short – Middle - classic – Long

17 Types of Orienteering Score Many Controls Values Time Limit Penalty Individual/Team ROGAINEs – Grueling – 6, 8, 12, 24 hour events

18 Types of Orienteering Sprint Orienteering Relays FASTO Series

19 Types of Orienteering Line Orienteering Follow Line drawn on map Timed Penalty for missed controls

20 Types of Orienteering Route Orienteering Follow route marked on ground Mark location of found controls on map Timed Penalty for inaccuracy

21 Types of Orienteering Window/Corridor-O Memory-O Trail-O Bike-O Street-O Night-O Ski-O Command-O History-O Canoe-O Radio-O Goats Other games Poker Declining score

22 Levels of Orienteering 4 levels of difficulty Beginner Advanced Beginner Intermediate Advanced

23 Levels of Orienteering 4 lengths of advanced Age graduated To suite the needs of all

24 Levels of Orienteering Color Coded White Yellow Orange Brown Green Red Blue Novice1-2 km Beginner2-3 km Intermediate3-5 km Advanced3-4 km Advanced4-5 km Advanced 6-8 km Advanced7-12 km

25 Levels of Orienteering Course Design White Yellow Orange Brown Green Red Blue – on trails – off trails – catching features, attack points BGRB – No Holds Barred

26 Levels of Orienteering Map Hiking – Versus Competitive Orienteering

27 An Adventure Orienteering can be enjoyed as a leisurely walk in the woods or as a competitive race.

28 An Orienteering Course… Consists of a start, a series of control sites to be visited in order, and a finish.

29 Controls The circles are centered on the feature to be found. A control marks the location. The description sheet describes the control placements and codes.

30 Punching To verify a visit, the orienteer uses a punch hanging next to the flag to mark his or her control card.

31 Techniques Attack Points Handrails Catching features Aiming Off Collecting features – Checking off – Map to terrain – Terrain to map Connecting features – making a virtual pathway Contouring Map simplification

32 Attack Points It is a feature… – near by the control That is easier to find… – than the control itself It is typically 50 to 100 meters away… – and seldom more than 150 meters. Whenever possible… – attack from above.

33 Handrails Grasp it by the hand. – Let it guide you safely to your destination. A linear feature You may follow it directly… – as on a path. You may travel along side … – it such as a fence. You can travel near it… – knowing that it will stop you from crossing over, like a guardrail.

34 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Hand Rail White Course.

35 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Hand Rail Yellow course.

36 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Hand Rail Orange course.

37 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Catching Feature Is usually a linear feature… – that is easy to notice, that resides just before or just beyond the control Use catching features to… – alert yourself that the control is coming up very soon or that you have just passed it. May also use catching features in… – aiming off.

38 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Catching Feature Traveling from 2 to 3 (cliff on the top) the orienteer has drifted to the left (north). The fence is as a catching feature. The alert orienteer is ‘caught’ by the catching feature. In this example the fence is followed to the hill top and a new attack is taken to the cliff top.

39 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Aiming Off Deliberately aiming to one side of a linear feature; to avoid guessing which way to turn

40 Collecting features – Checking off – Map to terrain – Terrain to map Observing the features that you pass by… – Noting them on your map. Noting features on the map that you should see… – Looking for them in your run

41 Connecting features Making a virtual pathway

42 Contouring – Advantage Maintain height, energy Use contour as a “handrail” – Disadvantage Rarely a straight line Easy to gain, lose height if not skilled Steep slopes are very slow to traverse (steepness and vegetation grows at odd angles) Tops of hills often open, easy running – General Rule: 10m climb = 100m flat

43 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Map Simplification Ignore the less useful abundance of detail. Look for the major features; handrails and catching features. Identify the attack point and minimum detail to get there. An orienteer takes a detailed map and visualizes a simplified version in the mind. Only the details relevant to moving between controls 4 and 5 are focused upon in the simplified metal map.

44 Reading Ahead When the navigating on the current leg is simple; use the time to prevue the next leg. Know what you will do before you need to know.

45 Relocation Invest a few minutes to save a lot 5 minutes now could save 20 or 30. Lose contact with map – STOP Orient the map with the compass. Match the terrain around you to the features on the map. Find a plausible route from last known location to here Otherwise, identify nearest definite guaranteed location Return to the last place of known location or bail out to a linear feature.

46 Systematic Orienteering Orienting the Map Align Orienting arrow with needle Find your current location Orienting the map/person together Check and know the scale and contour interval Study the next control Identify potential – Attack Points – Handrails – Catching & Collecting features Select your best route Be extra careful with the first several legs – Build confidence and familiarity with Map Terrain Self Read ahead – plan – Exit from control – Next route Check of features along the way

47 Route Choice changes with experience Judging Physical versus Mental aspects of choice – Navigational skills – Physical ability Safe versus Risky Negative Considerations – Climb – Obstacles – Distance – Difficulties – Vegetation – Out of bounds Positive considerations – Landmarks – Handrails – Features – catching, collecting – Attack points

48 Description Sheets

49

50 Rough vs Fine Orienteering Rough General knowledge of loaction Usually a high rate of speed. Gurenteed Catching features Planning and reading ahead Fine Precise Knowledge of location A little to a lot slower Avoiding risk Focused

51 Distance Judgment Measuring on a map – Using compass and map scales Dead reckoning – Subjective and limited use Pace Counting - A learned skill

52 Pace Counting Establishing ones pace Using Pace Counting Rough Orienteering Fine Orienteering Aiming Off Negative effects on Pace Count Climb 15m climb ~ 100m level Fatigue Obstacles – vegetation/features Slope – contouring Personal growth Injury Speed Walk/Run

53 Orienteering Cincinnati, © 2005 Pace Counting Using pace count – Count in the background – Make a perpetual habit – Always will have a rough distance traveled – Reset at all known locations – Accuracy dwindles with distance – Use to Gage when short or long Know where you have hit a crossing catching feature

54 Strategies Avoiding unnecessary climb Keeping the high ground Attacking from the high ground Aiming off Using a trail to read ahead Investing a bit of unnecessary time with safer routes to guarantee no lost time

55 Mistakes Parallel errors Directional errors Distance errors Losing contact with the map – Ignoring & misinterpreting features

56 Orienteering Rules No prior Knowledge of the course No mechanical or electronic aid (GPS) No assistance – navigate alone No following (mass start exceptions) Be quiet Help the injured Do not damage No trespassing Report to the finish

57 Orienteering Preparedness Clothes Shoes Nutrition Hydration Temperature Precipitation Wind Terrain Duration Eye protection

58 Post Orienteering Tick check Scratch and wound cleaning Clean dry warm clothes Draw route Evaluate and compare route choices Identify mistakes and better choices

59 Orienteering Opportunities Events – schedule – TROL – Saturdays (&Sundays) now through March Websitehttp://ocin.orghttp://ocin.org Contact info Pat Meehan – –


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