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Complex and Unfamiliar Words Year 8 Spelling Starters

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Presentation on theme: "Complex and Unfamiliar Words Year 8 Spelling Starters"— Presentation transcript:

1 Complex and Unfamiliar Words Year 8 Spelling Starters
This presentation matches Objective W1f – Homophones, Objective W3 – Investigate lexical patterns in new vocabulary; Key Objective W4 – Learn complex polysyllabic words and unfamiliar words which do not conform to regular patterns and Objective W6 – Spelling Strategies. Photo © 2006 Jupiterimages Corporation. Icons key: For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation Flash activity. These activities are not editable. Teacher’s notes included in the Notes Page Extension activities Web addresses Accompanying worksheet 1 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

2 Homophones and commonly confused words Complex words Word roots
Contents Homophones and commonly confused words Complex words Word roots Spelling strategies 2 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

3 Complex and Unfamiliar Words – Homophones
Homophones and commonly confused words 3 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

4 Commonly confused words
Do these words ever puzzle you? accept or except? practice or practise? affect or effect? choose or chose? principal or principle? quite or quiet? lose or loose?

5 Homophones Many commonly confused words are homophones – words which sound exactly the same but which are spelt differently. Some words are confused because, whilst not exactly the same, they sound or look very similar. Knowing the reason behind the difference may help you remember the word. Sometimes you may have to think up a little ‘trick’ or way of remembering how to spell the word – like sounding it out or with a mnemonic. I remind myself that ‘beautiful’ has a ‘u’ in it by remembering the phrase ‘u are beautiful’!

6 Homophones accept – a verb meaning to receive.
except – a word meaning not including. I’m sorry I gave everyone a Christmas present except you. I accept your apology. affect – a verb meaning to influence or change. effect – a noun meaning a result. Effect can also be a verb meaning to bring about, e.g. ‘He effected the result with ease’. Worksheet One accompanies this slide. Working too hard can affect your health. But the effect of my hard work was a really good exam grade!

7 Homophones principal – an adjective meaning first, main or leading and a noun meaning leader. principle – a noun meaning a basic rule or belief. I think Mr Jackson’s principal reason for becoming principal of our school was his love of power. I’m going to disagree with you on a matter of principle. practice – a noun. practise – a verb. Worksheet One accompanies this slide. No thanks, I need to practise my spelling! Do you want to come to football practice with me?

8 Homophones/commonly confused words
weather – a noun meaning sunshine, rain, etc. whether – a conjunction meaning if. What’s the weather going to be like later? I don’t know whether it’s going to be sunny or rainy. chose – (rhymes with those) Past tense. choose – (rhymes with shoes) Present tense and infinitive. Worksheet One accompanies this slide. I need to choose a pair of shoes for the dance on Friday. I already chose those red ones I told you about.

9 Commonly confused words
quite – an adverb meaning fairly or completely. quiet – an adjective or a noun meaning silent, silence. I’m quite annoyed with Max. Only because he told you to be quiet in the library! lose – (rhymes with whose) a verb meaning to not win. loose – (rhymes with truce) an adjective meaning not tight. ‘Loose’ can also be an archaic verb, e.g. ‘He loosed the hounds of hell’. Worksheet One accompanies this slide. Whose bracelet did you lose? Lei’s – it was too loose anyway, so we made a truce about it.

10 Homophones Worksheet Two accompanies this slide.

11 Complex and Unfamiliar Words – Homophones
Complex words 11 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

12 Complex words Worksheet Three accompanies this slide. The students are asked to write the words that are being defined and so may benefit from the Flash activity more if they go through it in class together after completing the worksheet. Alternatively, you could go through the Flash activity in class and then the students would have to remember how to spell the words to complete the worksheet later.

13 Complex words An extension task could be to list other examples of words with these endings. Two words which may be interesting to discuss are ‘stationary’ and ‘stationery’, the respective meanings of which are ‘motionless’ and ‘writing/office materials’. Worksheet Three accompanies this slide.

14 Complex words Students could be encouraged to create their own quiz of really tricky words for a partner. Worksheet Four accompanies this slide.

15 Complex and Unfamiliar Words – Homophones
Word roots 15 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

16 Can you find examples of these roots in other words?
Roots of words Knowing about the roots (or stems) of words, particularly those with Latin and Greek roots, can help you get to grips with unfamiliar words. How do the roots of these words help us to understand the meanings? (Check in a dictionary.) anti (against) + dote (given) = antidote abs (from, away) + tain (keep) = abstain contra (against) + dict (say) = contradict pro (onwards) + pel (drive) = propel Worksheet Five accompanies this slide. Some examples: anti-: antidepressant, antibody, anti-war, anti-clockwise -dote: anecdote ab-: absent, abscond, absolve, absorb, abstract -tain: obtain, attain, contain, detain, retain contra-: contrary, contraception, contraband, contravene, contrast -dict: dictionary, predict, dictate, edict, dictator pro-: proceed, progress, propose, prognosis, project -pel: repel, compel, expel, dispel Can you find examples of these roots in other words?

17 Complex and Unfamiliar Words – Homophones
Spelling strategies 17 of 18 © Boardworks Ltd 2006

18 Spelling strategies Look for and study words that catch you out. Use the ‘look, say, cover, write, check’ technique to practise spelling difficult words. You may find looking at the roots of words helpful and learning the meanings of the different prefixes and suffixes, so that you can break long words into more manageable chunks. Splitting words into different syllables and sounding them out can help you to spell difficult words correctly. Remember to record new words in your spelling journal.


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