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Classical Allusions. Classical Mythology & Allusions Greek Myths are still relevant today because there are many references in our language and literature.

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Presentation on theme: "Classical Allusions. Classical Mythology & Allusions Greek Myths are still relevant today because there are many references in our language and literature."— Presentation transcript:

1 Classical Allusions

2 Classical Mythology & Allusions Greek Myths are still relevant today because there are many references in our language and literature. These indirect references are called classical allusions. Greek Myths are still relevant today because there are many references in our language and literature. These indirect references are called classical allusions.

3 Achilles Heel / Achilles Achilles Heel Achilles Heel A strong sinew running along the heel to the calf of the leg. The vulnerable or weak point in a man’s character or of a nation. Achilles The tale is that Thetis took her son Achilles by the heel, and dipped him in the river Styx to make him invulnerable. The water washed every part, except the heel covered with his mother’s hand. It was on this vulnerable point the hero was slain; and the sinew of the heel is called, in consequence, tendo Achillis.

4 Arachnid / Arachne Arachnid ArachnidSpider She was a fine weaver in Hypaipa of Lydia who became so conceited of her skill as a weaver that she began claiming that her skill was greater than that of Athena, the goddess of weaving.LydiaAthena Athena was angered, but gave Arachne a chance to redeem herself. Assuming the form of an old woman, she warned Arachne not to offend the gods. Arachne scoffed and wished for a weaving contest, so she could prove her skill. Even Athena admitted that Arachne's work was flawless, but was outraged at Arachne's disrespectful choice of subjects that displayed the failings and transgressions of the gods.[1] Finally losing her temper, Athena destroyed Arachne's tapestry and loom, striking it with her shuttle, and struck Arachne on the head as well. Arachne realized her folly and was crushed with shame. She ran off and hanged herself.[1]

5 Zephyr / Zephyrus Zephyr (Disney), the son of Esmeralda (Disney) and Phoebus in the film The Hunchback of Notre Dame II Zephyr (Disney), the son of Esmeralda (Disney) and Phoebus in the film The Hunchback of Notre Dame II Zephyr (Disney)Esmeralda (Disney)PhoebusThe Hunchback of Notre Dame II Zephyr (Disney)Esmeralda (Disney)PhoebusThe Hunchback of Notre Dame II USS Zephyr (PC-8), a ship of the United States Navy USS Zephyr (PC-8), a ship of the United States Navy USS Zephyr (PC-8) USS Zephyr (PC-8) Pioneer Zephyr, a diesel-powered railroad trainset built in 1934 for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Pioneer Zephyr, a diesel-powered railroad trainset built in 1934 for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Pioneer Zephyr Pioneer Zephyr California Zephyr, a diesel-powered passenger train famous for its use of Vista-Dome cars California Zephyr, a diesel-powered passenger train famous for its use of Vista-Dome cars California Zephyr California Zephyr Mercury Zephyr, an automobile Mercury Zephyr, an automobile Mercury Zephyr Mercury Zephyr Zephyr pole, a wind elemental weapon in the Playstation 2 RPG Final Fantasy XII. Zephyr pole, a wind elemental weapon in the Playstation 2 RPG Final Fantasy XII.Playstation 2Final Fantasy XIIPlaystation 2Final Fantasy XII Zephyrus was the west wind and bringer of light spring and early summer breezes Zephyrus was the west wind and bringer of light spring and early summer breezes One of the wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various seasons and weather conditions One of the wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various seasons and weather conditionscardinal direction seasonscardinal direction seasons

6 Nemesis From the Greek "to give what is due“ From the Greek "to give what is due“ one's worst enemy, normally someone or something that is the exact opposite of oneself but is also somehow similar. For example, Professor Moriarty is frequently described as the nemesis of Sherlock Holmes. one's worst enemy, normally someone or something that is the exact opposite of oneself but is also somehow similar. For example, Professor Moriarty is frequently described as the nemesis of Sherlock Holmes.Professor Moriarty Sherlock HolmesProfessor Moriarty Sherlock Holmes In Greek mythology was the spirit of divine retribution against those who succumb to hubris, vengeful fate personified as a remorseless goddess.Greek mythologyretributionhubris


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