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Do Now: What do you think that the first paragraph of a research article should do for a reader? (Hint: think about how people generally read magazines)

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Presentation on theme: "Do Now: What do you think that the first paragraph of a research article should do for a reader? (Hint: think about how people generally read magazines)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Do Now: What do you think that the first paragraph of a research article should do for a reader? (Hint: think about how people generally read magazines)

2 Hooks Getting off on the right foot! (the key to writing effective hooks)

3 A hook is the beginning of a piece of writing. A hook…  gives the reader clues about what to expect in the writing that follows.  makes the reader want to keep reading.  is relatively short (usually one to two paragraphs).  contains a thesis statement.

4 The Movie Theater Monopoly by Emily Robinson Today, if you were to go to the Hoyts Cinema in Brunswick, the ticket prices would shock you. For an adult – which Hoyts defines as someone twelve or older – to attend an evening movie, the cost is $10. In other words, a motorist could buy six gallons of gasoline for as much as it costs for one person to see an hour and a half movie. Is there a way to see a movie locally, at a large movie theater, without paying Hoyts prices? No. Hoyts is the only multiplex theater in midcoast Maine. Hoyts is a monopoly that needs to be broken up.

5 Beef as a Health Food? You Bet by Jed Chambers You’re in the supermarket, shopping for your dinner. You wander to the meat counter and notice that sirloin is on sale. You love beef, and you want to sink your teeth into a nice juicy steak tonight, but you’ve been told by nutritionists that it will raise your cholesterol levels through the roof. Well, put that steak in your shopping cart. Believe it or not, there is a side of beef that isn’t talked about enough – the healthy side.

6 The Anecdote Hook  A brief story that captures the essence of the issue or situation.  You may want to use this type of lead if you would like your reader to think about their experiences with your topic.

7 The Feminist Question by Anne Atwell-McLeod Feminism? “It makes me think of women who don’t shave their legs,” popular TV actress Sarah Michelle Gellar was recently quoted as saying in JUMP magazine. A figure in the media who influences a lot of adolescents, Gellar perpetuates a stereotype of feminism that makes a joke of the bold steps taken over the past century, stereotypes that in today’s society are much more widely recognized that feminism’s reality. People should look beyond these mistaken ideas and understand that feminist ideals make life richer and fairer, both for women and men.

8 The Quotation Hook  A quote from your research that speaks to or exemplifies the focus of your work.  You may want to use this lead if you think you have a quote that will grab your reader’s attention.

9 Stop the Tobacco Companies from Targeting Kids by Jack Sherman Ninety percent of American smokers started as teenagers. There are lots of reasons for this scary statistic: peer pressure, parents who smoke, and, most significantly, because of the billions of dollars spent by the tobacco industry on ads that target kids.

10 The Facts/News Hook  The writer gives some startling facts and statistics.  You may want to use this lead if you have a fact or statistic that would grab the reader’s attention.

11 Lethal Possibilities by Erin K. Witham On August 6th, 1945, the USA dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later another bomb of plutonium was dropped on the city of Nagasaki. Despite the many casualties and the controversy surrounding this decision, these bombings were necessary in order to end the war.

12 The Background Hook  The writer gives a brief history of the issue or situation.  If you have a great deal of background information, you may want to use this lead.

13 What Is The Prize? by Peter Wilde An elementary school principal dyes his hair green when students read 10,000 pages. Another school hosts a pizza party for students to celebrate a similar “achievement”. Give me a break. Readers don’t need prizes. Reading itself is the prize.

14 The Announcement Hook  The writer tells the reader what he or she is going to say about the issue or situation and takes a strong attitude  You may want to use this lead if you feel very strongly about your topic and can use convincing language to get your point across.

15 Hooks to avoid...  A dictionary definition: Webster’s defines conformity as… It is too common  A question to the reader: How did that hamburger you had last night get to the shelves of your supermarket? It assumes your reader cares about the answer

16 More hooks to avoid...  A cliché: We’ve all heard the expression, “Better safe than sorry,” but is that true of today’s airline security procedures? Your reader is already snoring  Introducing yourself: Hi! My name is Mike and I am here to tell you about… It doesn’t grab the reader’s attention.

17 Which one do I use?  You must decide what kind of hook suits your topic and writing style. You should also look at the research you have.


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