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 Pick up the Papers on the Back Counter  Find your seat  Work on Crime Puzzle #4.

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Presentation on theme: " Pick up the Papers on the Back Counter  Find your seat  Work on Crime Puzzle #4."— Presentation transcript:

1  Pick up the Papers on the Back Counter  Find your seat  Work on Crime Puzzle #4

2  Why does Mr. Hudson’s chauffeur think he’s bound for prison?

3 What skills are most important in solving crimes?

4  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

5

6 #1

7  How many people were in the bank?  What time was it?  What is the date?  What’s on the sign?  What is the man at the front of the line handing the teller?  What’s on the man’s hat?  What is the woman with the little girl wearing?

8 #1

9  What is observation?

10  Observations  Things that you can see but also feel, taste, smell, or hear  Items you need to note carefully  Our perceptions (how we interpret information received from the senses) limit what we observe  It is an active process that takes training to develop

11  Casually watching what happens  “You see but you do not observe.”--Sherlock Holmes

12 12 #2

13  How many women are in the photograph?  How many of the women are wearing hats?  How many women are wearing ties?  How many women have on boots?  How many vehicles are shown in the picture?

14 14 #2

15  In the two examples, what types of details did you find easy to remember?  What types of details did you find hard to remember?  Which was easier, doing things on your own or working as a group? Why?  How many details about the pictures do you think you could remember by the end of the day? Tomorrow? Next week?

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17 Observation Information from our senses What We Pay Attention to Filter out some information Perception Fill in gaps from previous knowledge and enriches with detail what we see, hear, feel, taste, and touch Short Term Memory Recently stored information Long Term Memory Information that remains in memory – needs rehearsed & practiced to retain.

18  Observe systematically  Do not pay attention to only what you think is important  Make a conscious effort to pay attention to all the details in your surroundings.  Look for patterns and make connections.  Do not assume that later on you will be able to remember everything. 18

19 From: #3

20  Is this a business or residential area?  How many vehicles are parked on the sides of the road?  What color is the pickup truck driving in the road?  Any minivans around? How many?  What does the blue sign say?  What's the speed limit?  Are there any pedestrians on the road?

21  Read pages 3-9 and do the questions listed in your handout.

22  Pick up new note sheet on the back counter.  Read pages 3-9 and do the questions listed in your handout.

23  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

24 From: #3

25  Puts observations in long-term memory  Helps you to remember your observations over a long period of time  Keeps the details fresh in your mind

26  Write it down—take notes  Photograph or videotape  Make an audio recording  Sketch or draw maps of scene

27  Break into 2 person teams  One person from each group go over to Mrs. Moran’s room  The other person will observe the picture, feel free to take some notes to help you remember.

28 #4

29  Group from Mrs. Moran’s room: Ask questions about what your teammate observed  All the investigators will then have 10 minutes to confer and reconstruct the scene on the whiteboard from the description they got from their partner – no help from the observers at this point

30  Read over directions for lab #2  Generate 3 ideas for crime scenario you can act out for Lab #2.  Finish the reading and questions if you haven’t got them completed

31  Work on lab scenarios  Generate 3 ideas for crime scenario you can act out for Lab #2.

32  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

33 #4

34  Did everyone answer the questions correctly?  If everyone viewed the same photograph, list some possible reasons why your answers differed.  Did your ability to see more detail and answer more questions correctly improve with practice? Explain your answer.  Do you consider yourself a good observer?

35  Does observation only involve sight and not the other senses?

36  You will get 1 minute with each box. Then you will switch with another person.  You need to determine what is in each box based on observations you made using your other senses  You are not permitted to open the boxes.  Write your hypotheses on your paper.  Repeat until you have investigated three boxes  Answer the questions on your handout.

37  What assumptions can you make about this scene? How might those assumptions be wrong? 37 #5

38

39  Take a blank sheet of paper  Place open hand in the middle of the sheet.  To the right side of hand make a small dark cross  To the left side of hand make a small dark dot

40  Hold left hand over eye, hold paper at arm’s length  Stare at dot on the left with the right eye only. (Both items visible)  Now move paper slowly towards you and see what happens  Repeat with right eye covered, and stare at cross with left eye

41  What happened as you moved the paper towards you? Anything strange?  Why do you think this happened?

42  You and your classmates will enact different crimes. Develop a skit for your crime scenario that you will perform for the class. Your teacher will have a group of items you may use to simulate these crimes or you may bring items in from home as long as they are school appropriate. If in doubt, ask your teacher first.

43  Where was the sun earlier today?  Where will it be later today?  How did it get from the morning point to the afternoon point?  What is the size of a full moon just above the horizon compared to its size straight overhead?

44  In your group, list as many other illusions in nature as you can  Pick a spokesperson to share your list with the rest of the class.

45

46

47

48

49  All your senses can be fooled in some way or another

50 zSend one person from each group forward to take a close look at the two balls zIn your group, write whether you think the balls are identical and what you think will happen zWatch the demonstration zDiscuss the results as a class

51

52  With all these limitations is observation still useful?  How can we get around those limitations?

53  Watch for potential illusions.  Turn off filters  Keep in mind that memory is faulty.  Remember that our brains tend to automatically fill in gaps in our perceptions.  Remember that eyewitness accounts and your own thinking can include prejudices. 53

54  Work on lab scenarios  Review vocabulary and notes. Make sure to note any questions you have and ask them in class tomorrow.

55  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

56  Review notes and vocabulary.  Read pages 3-9 and do the questions listed in your handout if you didn’t get it done last night.  Work on scenario for observation lab.

57  Cameras, video recorders… record observations so they can be viewed again.  Microscopes provide fast, low-cost, and definitive results whether it’s simple hand-lenses or more the more powerful types found in labs  Tools that use other forms of electromagnetic radiation like ultraviolet and infrared can reveal hidden evidence our eyes can’t see

58  You and your classmates will enact different crimes. Develop a skit for your crime scenario that you will perform for the class. Your teacher will have a group of items you may use to simulate these crimes or you may bring items in from home as long as they are school appropriate. If in doubt, ask your teacher first.

59  Turn in your questions from the reading for some feedback.  Work on scenario for observation lab with your group.

60  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

61

62 #6

63  At what location was the photograph taken?  How many cars are pictured?  What color are the cars?  What types of offices are located in the building?  How many small trees are in the picture?  The photograph was taken in New York State during which season?  How many people are in the photograph?

64 #7

65  What is pictured in Photograph 2?  Describe the shape of the object pictured.  What are the colors of the object?  What color edged the top of the object?  Upon what is the object displayed?  Describe or sketch the design on the object.  What is the approximate size of the object?

66 #8

67  How many people are in Photograph 3?  What is the sex of the person in the picture?  What is the approximate age of the person in the photograph?  What color is the person’s hair?  Does the person have long hair or short hair?  Does the person have any distinguishing features? Glasses?  Can you describe the person’s clothing?  Is the person wearing any jewelry? If so, describe it.  Can you describe where the picture was taken?  Based on evidence in the photograph, can you form a hypothesis about the person’s occupation?  Is it possible to identify the interests of the person based on evidence in the room?

68  Is your ability to see more detail and answer more questions correctly improving with practice? Explain your answer.

69  Study situations.  Find clues in ordinary details.  Work backwards from the evidence to what led up to the crime.  Be patient.  Practice. 69

70  Basis for all crime scene investigation  Finding the facts without bias (driven by your own emotions or ideas)  Allows you to find clues or tail a suspect  Creates in mind images of what a person sees which can be stored in order for the person to remember later

71  To testify in court where you must know the details months after you made your observations  Inadequate information and details will allow a criminal to get off

72  You want to describe:  Who was involved?  What happened?  When did it take place?  Where did it take place?  How did it happen?  Anything unusual or out of the ordinary

73  On a crime scene you will not know what will turn out to be important.  Start at one part of a crime scene and run your eyes slowly over every space.  Slowly look at every part of a piece of evidence.  Leave the final interpretation of data until later  The more information obtained, the better will be the interpretations.  It is important to document as much information as possible. 73

74  You and your classmates will enact different crimes. Develop a skit for your crime scenario that you will perform for the class. Your teacher will have a group of items you may use to simulate these crimes or you may bring items in from home as long as they are school appropriate. If in doubt, ask your teacher first.

75  Review your notes and vocabulary.  Finalize your scenarios  Don’t forget to bring in your props.

76  Finalize scenario for observation lab with your group.

77  Define observation and perception  Describe what changes occur in the brain during observation  Describe some of the problems in making good observations  Relate observation skills to their use in forensic science  Use observation skills to make good observations during events

78  Position yourself in an area where you can see the location where the crime will take place.  Place your pencil and Crime Report Sheet on the floor beside your desk or chair.  Mentally record the information as you witness each crime. Make use of you all your senses during this process.  On the Crime Report Sheet and under Crime #1, record as much detail as you can about the event you witnessed.  Repeat steps 1 through 4 for the other crimes you will observe.  Take this Crime Report Sheet home with you and study your notes. Think about what occurred. Did you accidentally omit any information? If so, add it at this time.  Use your notes about the crimes you observed to answer the questions on the worksheet.

79  Finish the lab.  Do the review questions on the handout.

80  define clues, long-term memory, observation, short- term memory, and tail  explain the importance of observation  explain the importance of remembering events.  describe key items that they need to remember about an event.  explain the importance of recording events  describe ways of recording events


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