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Advisory Working Groups Town of LaGrange December 15, 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Advisory Working Groups Town of LaGrange December 15, 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advisory Working Groups Town of LaGrange December 15, 2014

2 Agenda  Introductions  Recap –About Advisory Working Groups (AWG) –Project Overview & Update –AWG Recap  Tonight’s topics –Noise & Safety –Project Benefits (short and long term) –Design Factors  Planning for next AWG 2

3 Tonight’s Speakers  Bob De Meyere – Cricket Valley Energy (CVE) –Project Manager – Cricket Valley Energy Center  Ted Barten – Epsilon Associates, Inc. –Project environmental consultant  Nora Madonick – Arch Street Communications –Public information and outreach 3

4 What is an Advisory Working Group (AWG)?  Informal, unofficial opportunities for the public and project experts to share information and ideas  Not required by the public process – additional outreach by Cricket Valley Energy – comments are not part of the official public record  No specialized knowledge is needed – technical information will be presented in plain language  If you are attending as a member of an organization, please share what you learn tonight with your members  Announced via website, postcards, blast, calendar listing, posters, advertising, posting on town websites 4

5 AWGs are self-determined.  The group:  Chose the topics for tonight’s meeting  Requested use of microphones as needed  Requested longer question/answer period  All meeting materials will be posted on the web following tonight’s meeting  Please visit cricketvalleytransmission.com for updates and to sign up for notifications 5

6 Recap: Project Overview  Cricket Valley Energy is a 1000 MW energy generation facility in Dover, NY  Fully approved and permitted  Completed State Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) process  Restoration of abandoned industrial site 6

7 Recap: New York Independent System Operator Requirement  CVE has been required by NYISO to increase transmission/transfer capacity, redundancy, and operational capacities by:  Funding and installing 14.6-mile transmission line in existing right-of-way between CVE in Dover and Con Edison substation in Pleasant Valley  Reconductoring 3.4-mile segment of existing line between CVE substation and the NY/CT border  Upgrading Pleasant Valley substation (within existing footprint) security/communication infrastructure 7  NOT part of any of the following transmission line projects: NY Transco Edic to Pleasant Valley; NEXTERA New Scotland to Pleasant Valley; North American Transmission; or Boundless Energy Transmission

8 Project Status 8

9 AWG Recap  Visual Impact  The CVE team identified an option to reduce the proposed pole height by as much as 40 ft by using H-frame poles, replacing monopoles in certain key locations, and modifying the original design of the monopoles  Design changes have been submitted for approval to Con Edison  Underground Construction −Based on the significant environmental and other potential impacts, the underground option failed to satisfy the project design requirements set forth by Con Edison and NYISO 9

10 Noise & Safety Tonight we will cover:  Noise:  Construction Phase  Operational Phase  Safety:  Standards  Clearances & Aviation 10

11 Noise: Construction Phase 11  Short intervals of work along the right-of-way over a total schedule of 24 months. Short-term sound may include: −Standard construction equipment, such as drill rigs, rough terrain cranes, cable pulling rigs −Helicopters (heavy lift and light duty) −Trucks to deliver materials, bring workers to and from active construction areas  The construction process will not include: − Use of explosives/blasting − Use of rock breaking/trenching equipment  Restrictions will be in place to limit noise-producing construction activity to standard daylight working hours

12 Noise: Operational Phase 12  Corona effect −Phenomenon associated with all energized electrical devices, including high-voltage transmission lines −Air close to the conductors may become ionized and generate some sound energy (humming, crackling) −Most audible during low ambient noise and high humidity. Least audible (masked) when raining steadily −CVE will use “bundled conductors” to minimize corona effect  Con Edison line inspection and right-of-way maintenance −Consistent with current practices/policies

13 Safety: Standards  CVE will address all considerations in order to meet safety standards, including:  Construction: Foundations, cable weight and tension, wind loads, ice loads, design  Monopoles: Safety record, resistance to strain, ice/snow loads, and insect/bird damage  Operational: Grounding, pole type, distance between equipment and conductors, distance between nearby structures and conductors  High-voltage transmission lines have a strong reliability record 13

14 Safety: Clearances and Aviation 14  Clearances  Vegetation and trees, if not properly maintained, can be a source of outages (including the 2003 blackout)  Clearing requirements will be determined by applicable wire security zone standards  Aviation Safety  Structure heights, locations, and lighting in accordance with FAA requirements will ensure safe operation of the transmission line in Sky Acres Airport area

15 QUESTIONS 15

16 Benefits (Short & Long Term) Tonight we will cover:  Labor and workforce  Sourcing local business  Low impact design  Restoration of impacted areas 16

17 Labor and Workforce 17  Direct and indirect positive impacts to regional economy of over $1 billion over 20 years  Power Plant −Up to 750 direct construction jobs – averaging around 300 per year for the estimated 3 year construction period (Approx. $147 million) −More than 1500 indirect, and induced jobs −56 direct, indirect, and induced jobs supporting operations (post construction phase)  Transmission Line −60 to 80 direct construction jobs −Up to 80 additional Indirect and induced jobs in support of project

18 Sourcing Local Business 18  Indirect and induced employment −Local purchases during construction  Materials and services  For construction work force (meals, fuel, incidentals, lodging, etc.) −Local services to support construction and operation  Sky Acres Airport and other sites to support construction  Tax Revenue to State, County, Towns, and School district

19 Low Impact Design 19  Minimal footprint −Proposed transmission line will be constructed entirely within the existing right-of-way −Existing Con Edison right-of-way is presently more than 90% free of tree growth −For safety and reliability, some trees along the southern edge of the right-of-way will be cleared in accordance with industry standard safety requirements (less than 8% of the total right-of-way area) −Construction to be limited  Pole locations – 4-5 per mile

20 Low Impact Design (continued) 20  Construction measures −Protective measures such as hay bale and silt fence barriers between the resource areas and work areas to prevent inadvertent impacts to wetlands and streams −Highly-trained construction monitors to oversee work; including particular attention to sensitive areas to prevent any damage to wetlands and streams along the right-of-way −Protection of threatened and endangered species habitats per DEC approval −Physical avoidance, time of year restrictions −Use of rock anchors in most locations −Selective use of helicopters to set poles

21 Restoration of Impacted Areas 21  Wetland restoration plan and remediation at CVE site in Dover  Transmission line – restoration of work areas  Natural buffers −Landscaping to screen the Pleasant Valley substation, along Rt. 44 −Natural tree buffer at CVE site in Dover

22 QUESTIONS 22

23 Design Factors Tonight we will cover:  Revised pole heights  Insulated cables  Ice and wind loads that can affect the line 23

24 Revised Pole Heights  Reviewed technical requirements ‒ National Electric Safety Code (NESC) ‒ Con Edison ‒ New York State Department of Public Service (DPS) 24

25 Revised Pole Heights  Key Considerations ‒ Con Edison phase-to-phase electrical clearance: 15 ft. minimum (displaced conductors) ‒ Con Edison phase-to-ground electrical clearance: 9 ft. minimum (displaced conductors) ‒ 35 foot electrical clearance to ground under maximum operating temperature of 180ºC (356ºF) ‒ EMF requirements  Distance to ground for EMF analysis: determined under winter normal temperature of 95ºC (203ºF)  For example: the span between CV-07 to CV-08 is 44 ft  EMF: Electric field < 1.6kV/m at edge of right-of-way  EMF: Magnetic field < 200 mG at edge of right-of-way 25

26 Why not use insulated cables?  Technically impractical for overhead high voltage transmission lines ‒ Insulated cables would be inches in diameter changing the weight from 2.5 lbs/ft to 44.7 lbs/ft ‒ Would require 3 cables for each phase – 9 cables total ‒ Requires cable bridge supports, abutments and additional wires to support the cable ‒ More massive and intrusive than overhead bare cables 26

27 What are the ice and wind loads?  Designs exceed NESC Code minimums  100-year wind loading of 25 psf wind pressure (100 mph) wind  100-year ice loading of 1” radial ice with a concurrent 8 psf (56 mph) wind  Unbalanced ½ inch ice 27

28 QUESTIONS 28

29 TOPICS FOR OUR NEXT ADVISORY WORKING GROUP 29


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