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The Good, The Bad & The Ugly A taxpayer’s guide to the public school funding crisis.

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Presentation on theme: "The Good, The Bad & The Ugly A taxpayer’s guide to the public school funding crisis."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Good, The Bad & The Ugly A taxpayer’s guide to the public school funding crisis

2 Tonight’s Agenda Student Performances Johnson Elementary Choir, led by Becky Sewell Colleyville Middle School All Girls Acapella Choir, led by Julie Moore Voice of Central High School Show Choir, led by Jenn Randall Pledges/Moment of Silence & National Anthem Student Council/Class Officers & Choir students from each high school led by Leigh Ann McClure, Central High School Head Choir Director The Good – a look at our three districts Superintendents David Faltys, Robin Ryan and James Veitenheimer 45-Minute Presentation Q & A Breakout Sessions Carroll – Student Activity Center Grapevine-Colleyville – Library Keller – Auditorium

3 Tonight’s forum Agenda The Bad – a look at Texas school funding (video) Finance Officers Robb Welch, Elaine Cogburn and Mark Youngs The Ugly – a look at our financial future Superintendents David Faltys, Robin Ryan and James Veitenheimer Taxpayers’ & Educators’ Call To Action Trustees Erin Shoupp, Jesse G. Rodriguez and Cindy Lotton Individual District Q & A Breakout Sessions Carroll (SAC), Grapevine-Colleyville (Library), Keller (Auditorium)

4 The Good Carroll ISD Rated EXEMPLARY by the Texas Education Agency (District and all 11 campuses) Student test scores exceed state/national averages; 0% drop out rate; 97% attend college Seven campuses on 2010 Texas Business Education Coalition (TBEC) Honor Roll National and state recognition for academics, athletics and fine arts programs Consistently earned state’s top SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT financial rating

5 The Good Carroll ISD Received bond rating upgrades by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s since 2009 Passed largest bond election in school history in May 2009 Awarded $2 million state solar panel grant to build new energy efficient middle school First district in Texas to take advantage of Build America Bonds, saving millions Reduced utility costs by 15% district-wide; utilizing geothermal energy source at new schools

6 The Good Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Earned the TEA “Recognized” rating for the last three years National Blue Ribbon Schools Record-high ACT scores for 2010 Forty-five National AP Scholars and 530 total AP Scholars Home to recipients of Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

7 The Good Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Home to the 2010 Bilingual Teacher of the Year for the Metroplex Earned highest rating of the Financial Integrity Rating System of Texas for the last eight years National and state recognition for excellence in financial reporting and purchasing procedures Texas Business and Education Coalition Honor Roll Newsweek’s Annual List of Best High Schools in the Country

8 The Good Keller ISD Rated RECOGNIZED by the TEA for the last three years Home to State Teachers of the Year Opened 13 new buildings since th most efficiently managed district, out of the 200 largest districts in Texas Texas Safe Schools Award

9 The Good Keller ISD Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools National Excellence Award National and State Financial Awards Newsweek’s Annual List of Best High Schools in the Country Just for the Kids Campaign for Higher Performing Schools in Texas Texas Business and Education Coalition Honor Roll

10 The Bad Financial Officers Texas School Finance 101 Video

11 The Bad Financial Officers Historical Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

12 Carroll ISD Historical Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

13 Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Historical Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

14 Keller ISD Historical Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

15 The Bad Financial Officers Projected Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

16 Carroll ISD Projected Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

17 Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Projected Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

18 Keller ISD Projected Revenue/Expenditure Comparison

19 The Bad Financial Officers Target Revenue

20 TARGET REVENUE

21 COMPARISON TARGET REVENUE

22 The Bad Financial Officers Revenue, Expenditures and Fund Balance Projections Through Under Current Law

23 Carroll ISD Revenues, Expenditures and Fund Balance Projections thru Under Current Law

24 Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Revenues, Expenditures and Fund Balance Projections thru Under Current Law

25 Keller ISD Revenues, Expenditures and Fund Balance Projections thru Under Current Law

26 The Ugly Supt. David Faltys Carroll ISD $4.3 million deficit - $2.1 million in cuts made for 10/11 (no salary increase) Projected deficit of $2.3 million for (without salary increase) This equates to 42 teaching positions or 8% of total teaching staff 28 administrative positions - over half of our 53 total 1 year of electrical costs At risk for cuts: block scheduling, teaming, Gifted & Talented, K-6 science lab, CARE Reading, extra/co-curricular activities and travel Online citizen budget survey on cuts Oct. 20-Nov. 12

27 The Ugly Supt. Robin Ryan Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Projected deficit of $6,615,338 for This equates to: 130 teaching positions or 13% of total teachers of administrative positions or 124% of total administrators of days or 2 years of electrical costs 28 months or 2 1/3 years of extra/co curricular activities 849 bus routes - we run 165 routes annually 2 years of supplies

28 The Ugly Supt. James Veitenheimer Keller ISD $5.6 M deficit $1.7 M healthcare increase $8.6 M AARA-Federal stimulus pkg. –gone/cut. $16 M deficit This equates to: 291 Teachers 170 Administrators – we only have days of electricity – that’s 2 ½ years worth 3 years worth of co-curricular activities 387 bus routes – we only have years worth of paper

29 Call To ACtion Trustee Erin Shoupp Local Control Roles/responsibilities of an elected School Board Trustee (hiring superintendent, developing policy, setting tax rates, and approving the annual budget, which is made possible through funding from the tax rate) Local property tax rates have been capped, limiting elected Trustees from providing funds for programs their constituents want and demand in their communities Local control is the best way for communities to utilize funds in the most effective and efficient ways to meet their students’ needs and maintain autonomy

30 Call To ACtion Trustee Erin Shoupp Local Control Local control or the authority of your locally elected Trustees is what gives parents and taxpayers a real voice in the education their children receive When control/authority shifts to the state, it creates potentially conflicting positions from constituents in various independent school districts as they approach their state lawmakers for funding priorities The proposed state-wide property tax may further decrease local control

31 Call To ACtion Trustee Jesse G. Rodriguez Unfunded Mandates Examples of state-requirements that sound positive initially, but actually limit your locally-elected Trustees and school districts include the cap on local property tax rates, bond and election date restrictions, school calendar start dates, testing initiatives and other unfunded mandates. Lawmakers often approve requirements for school districts that touch multiple areas of school district operations, but do not provide funding to implement those requirements Academically, some examples include End of Course Exams, Credit by Exam for Acceleration, 4X4 Curriculum for Math/Science, Graphing Calculators for TAKS Testing, etc.

32 Call To ACtion Trustee Jesse G. Rodriguez Unfunded Mandates In the area of staffing/salaries, House Bill 3646 mandated $800 raises for limited groups of employees, K-4 student-teacher ratio requirements, etc. Operationally, schools are required to assess student fitness, provide AED’s and CPR training to all sponsors, conduct health screenings, etc.

33 The Call To Action Trustee Cindy Lotton Texas Funding Formula In 2006 in an effort to ease the tax burden, the state lowered the maximum allowable Maintenance & Operations tax rate from $1.50 (per $100 valuation) to $1.04. The state’s Target Revenue for school districts based upon tax efforts. The closer a district was to $1.50 the more revenue received. Districts like Keller, who were not at the $1.50 maximum, received a lower target revenue amount. The result was a varied Target Revenue across districts in Texas. The per student revenue in districts across NE Tarrant county varies by thousands of dollars.

34 The Call To Action Trustee Cindy Lotton Texas Funding Formula Another broken piece of the funding formula has to do with property tax valuations. Unlike cities and counties, school districts do not benefit from an increase in property values. As property values rise, the revenue from the state decreases. A school district’s tax revenues remain capped at $1.04 M&O unless a local election is held Target revenues remain fixed at prior year levels Expenses continue to increase School districts in Texas need relief from this broken funding formula

35 Call To ACtion We Need Your Help! What You, As Taxpayers & Educators Can Do: Become informed about your district’s financial situation Write letters to Legislators – Make Education A Priority! Make phone calls to your state representatives/senators Participate in January road trip to Austin Stay informed and involved in state/local elections

36 Legislative Contacts - Handouts – Website District Breakout Q & A Sessions Carroll ISD – Student Activity Center Grapevine-Colleyville ISD – Library Keller ISD - Auditorium Thank You For Attending Our Forum!


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