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Russian Beekeeping Photos by Eric Tourneret. Credit Eric Tourneret Eric Tourneret Born in Annecy in France’s Haute Savoie, Éric Tourneret first traveled.

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Presentation on theme: "Russian Beekeeping Photos by Eric Tourneret. Credit Eric Tourneret Eric Tourneret Born in Annecy in France’s Haute Savoie, Éric Tourneret first traveled."— Presentation transcript:

1 Russian Beekeeping Photos by Eric Tourneret

2 Credit Eric Tourneret Eric Tourneret Born in Annecy in France’s Haute Savoie, Éric Tourneret first traveled at the age of 17 to fulfill his military service in Djibouti. This one-year experience abroad made a deep impression upon him, and since that time he has sought every opportunity to explore new horizons and journey to distant lands. Paris would serve as his pied-à-terre, and he began his professional training in a photography studio. Still life, fashion, and advertising became his daily world, and he simultaneously began a career as photojournalist for a number of magazines, including Jardins des Modes, VSD, and Paris Capitale. After covering the sorcerers and healers of the Ivory Coast, he started sending his stories out through the SIPA PRESS news service. Born in Annecy in France’s Haute Savoie, Éric Tourneret first traveled at the age of 17 to fulfill his military service in Djibouti. This one-year experience abroad made a deep impression upon him, and since that time he has sought every opportunity to explore new horizons and journey to distant lands. Paris would serve as his pied-à-terre, and he began his professional training in a photography studio. Still life, fashion, and advertising became his daily world, and he simultaneously began a career as photojournalist for a number of magazines, including Jardins des Modes, VSD, and Paris Capitale. After covering the sorcerers and healers of the Ivory Coast, he started sending his stories out through the SIPA PRESS news service. As a freelance journalist, he became a commissioned photographer for VSD, HISTORIA, GRAND REPORTAGE, and NEW LOOK. In 1997, his work on the “Transvestites of Islam” in Pakistan was shown at the “VISA pour l’Image” Festival in Perpignan. As a freelance journalist, he became a commissioned photographer for VSD, HISTORIA, GRAND REPORTAGE, and NEW LOOK. In 1997, his work on the “Transvestites of Islam” in Pakistan was shown at the “VISA pour l’Image” Festival in Perpignan. Fascinated by Pakistan, he worked there with great regularity until September 2001 and produced stories around the world for POINT DE VUE, VOICI, ÇA M’INTÉRESSE, FEMME ACTUELLE, SCIENCES & AVENIR. Fascinated by Pakistan, he worked there with great regularity until September 2001 and produced stories around the world for POINT DE VUE, VOICI, ÇA M’INTÉRESSE, FEMME ACTUELLE, SCIENCES & AVENIR. His facility and technical expertise in photography allows him to switch styles with ease, letting curiosity be his guide, taking him from archaeology to scientific expeditions, from social issues to monarch butterfly migration. His facility and technical expertise in photography allows him to switch styles with ease, letting curiosity be his guide, taking him from archaeology to scientific expeditions, from social issues to monarch butterfly migration. In 2003, when he adopted digital photography once and for all for a commissioned arts book project, he began capturing the world of the handicapped through his lens and was twice published by PARIS MATCH. In 2003, when he adopted digital photography once and for all for a commissioned arts book project, he began capturing the world of the handicapped through his lens and was twice published by PARIS MATCH. Digital photography gave him new freedom and he began in-depth work exploring bees, nature, and man, which he continues to pursue as part of his commitment to environmental protection. Digital photography gave him new freedom and he began in-depth work exploring bees, nature, and man, which he continues to pursue as part of his commitment to environmental protection. The photographs The photographs “My approach for all of these images was to try to capture live bees in photos by having the bees pose as models. Most of the photographs were meticulously prepared with a view to exploring their graphic elements. Often the problem was to find the right relationship between the size of the bee relative to its environment. Each flower requires a different visual approach and it was often necessary to continue the shoot until I ‘understood the flower’s form.’ The other challenge was move away from familiar images, those that have been done time and time again, and find a fresh perspective, a new way to frame the shot, a new cultural and photographic reference point.” “My approach for all of these images was to try to capture live bees in photos by having the bees pose as models. Most of the photographs were meticulously prepared with a view to exploring their graphic elements. Often the problem was to find the right relationship between the size of the bee relative to its environment. Each flower requires a different visual approach and it was often necessary to continue the shoot until I ‘understood the flower’s form.’ The other challenge was move away from familiar images, those that have been done time and time again, and find a fresh perspective, a new way to frame the shot, a new cultural and photographic reference point.” This additional objective meant that the photo looking directly at the three bees in flight took a full week of work in a colza field. A hive was set up in the area that provided the desired background and a false hive containing the camera was set up just beside it. The site was then encircled by studio flashes for improved lighting. Éric sought to capture an original shot by removing the real hive filled with bees to fool the field bees upon their return. After four days of fruitless shooting, he found it necessary to change techniques and asked a swarm-catcher for a batch of bees… This additional objective meant that the photo looking directly at the three bees in flight took a full week of work in a colza field. A hive was set up in the area that provided the desired background and a false hive containing the camera was set up just beside it. The site was then encircled by studio flashes for improved lighting. Éric sought to capture an original shot by removing the real hive filled with bees to fool the field bees upon their return. After four days of fruitless shooting, he found it necessary to change techniques and asked a swarm-catcher for a batch of bees… “I put the queen and a few bees in a cage in the false hive, and they immediately began fanning. The bulk of the swarm in another, smaller hive ten meters away began to stir and then, in one dense, airborne throng, the bees moved towards my camera. I blindly started shooting while doing my best to deal with the bees that were landing on the optics. Finally, after a week in this Camargue field and 4,500 shutter releases, the photo was in the bag. It surpassed my every expectation. Not a frontal shot of one bee in flight in its natural environment, but three bees dancing in the air before me.” “I put the queen and a few bees in a cage in the false hive, and they immediately began fanning. The bulk of the swarm in another, smaller hive ten meters away began to stir and then, in one dense, airborne throng, the bees moved towards my camera. I blindly started shooting while doing my best to deal with the bees that were landing on the optics. Finally, after a week in this Camargue field and 4,500 shutter releases, the photo was in the bag. It surpassed my every expectation. Not a frontal shot of one bee in flight in its natural environment, but three bees dancing in the air before me.” At other times, as with the photo “Bees at the watering hole,” sheer good luck made the shot. Having come to the Larzac to photograph the thyme transhumance, Éric noticed a constant coming-and-going of bees at a watering hole called “lavogne.” “It reminded me of wild animals gathering around watering holes in Africa, and I adapted the shot to give it that feel…” At other times, as with the photo “Bees at the watering hole,” sheer good luck made the shot. Having come to the Larzac to photograph the thyme transhumance, Éric noticed a constant coming-and-going of bees at a watering hole called “lavogne.” “It reminded me of wild animals gathering around watering holes in Africa, and I adapted the shot to give it that feel…” More Photos More Photos

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