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BAPTIST HISTORY LESSON 3 RISE OF THE GENERAL BAPTISTS.

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Presentation on theme: "BAPTIST HISTORY LESSON 3 RISE OF THE GENERAL BAPTISTS."— Presentation transcript:

1 BAPTIST HISTORY LESSON 3 RISE OF THE GENERAL BAPTISTS

2 Apostolic Church Apostolic Fathers Church Councils Church History Ca. 30AD590 AD1517 AD Golden Age of Church Fathers Ancient Church HistoryMedieval Church HistoryModern Church History The Pre-Reformers The First Medieval Pope The Rise of the Holy Roman Empire The Crusades The Papacy in Decline

3 LUTHER ZWINGLI CALVIN MAGISTERIAL REFORMATIONRADICAL REFORMATION SWISS BRETHREN PILGRIM MARPECT ? MUNSTER REBELLION MENNO SIMONS REFORMATION IN ENGLAND

4 HENRY VIII Thomas Cranmer Edward VI Thomas Cromwell Henry VIII & wives

5 “Bloody” Mary Elizabeth I Elizabethan Religious Settlement via media ‘Puritans ’

6 Rise of Separatists “The Separatists believed that Canterbury was so defiled by Rome as to be a false Church; the Puritans believed that, while the evidence showed the Church of England to be inadequately reformed, it was sufficiently reformed for it to be, or at least for it to become, a true Church.” B.R. White The English Separatist Tradition: From the Marian Exiles to the Pilgrim Fathers Reformed in theologyCongregational in polity Robert Browne (c ) A Treatise on Reformation Without Tarrying for Anie 1582 Francis Johnson ( ) John Robinson ( ) Leiden, Holland ‘Pilgrim Church’ Scrooby Manor

7 King James I When he ascended to the throne RC, Presb, & Anglicans all had high hopes for him RC – his mother, Mary, Queen of Scots, was catholic He was from Scotland, the heart of Presbyterianism; he was raised by Presbyterian clergy & politicians Anglican – episcopacy supported King as head of church Presbyterians immediately appeal to the new King King James VI of Scotland ( ) became King when 13 months old King James I of England ( ) became King when Elizabeth dies James abandoned his Presbyterianism and became a full fledged Anglican “no Bishop no King”

8 RISE OF THE GENERAL BAPTISTS John Smyth (c ) I Early life and educationCambridge Frances Johnson Polemic against Calvinism II Lecturer at Lincoln (1600) III Move to Separatism Failure of Hampton Court Conference (1604) Principles and Inferences concerning the Visible Church (1607) Formation of the church at Gainsborough by covenant IV Move to Amsterdam (1608) “Some people take the prick when the prick were not in all the minister’s disposition but they are pricked in the Lord’s disposition!” “to walk in the Lord’s ways made known by him…whatsoever shall the cost may be” The Differences of the Churches of the Seperation [sic] Officers Worship Treasury Paralleles [sic] Censures, Observations (1609)

9 V Move to Baptism The Character of the Beast (1609) 1. No scriptural command or example of infant baptism 2. Theological framework of Old Covenant moving to New Covenant Practices ‘se-baptism’ VI Move to Anabaptist Views (1610) Congregation divides 60 remain with Smyth 12 go with Thomas Helwys The Last Booke of John Smith, Called the Retraction of His Errours, and the Confirmation of the Truth ‘That the magistrate is not by virtue of his office to meddle with religion, or matters of conscience, to force or compel men to this or that form of religion, or doctrine; but to leave Christian religion free, to every man’s conscience, and to handle only civil transgressions…., injuries and wrongs of man against man, in murder, adultery, theft, etc., for Christ only is the king, and lawgiver of the church and conscience…’

10 Thomas Helwys (c c.1616) 1612 church settles in Spitalfields Cultural barriers between the two groups Many disagreed with Mennonite position of Christians not serving as magistrates All disagreed with Mennonite position on ‘the heavenly flesh of Christ’ Docetism: the heretical Christology that Jesus did not exist as a real man but merely appeared to be so A Declaration of Faith in English People Remaining at Amsterdam in Holland (1611) A Short Declaration of the Mistery of Iniquity (1612) “the king is a mortal man, and not God therefore hath not power over ye immortal souls of his subjects, to make laws and ordinances for them, and to set spiritual lords over them. If the king have authority to make spiritual lords and laws, then he is immortal God, and not a mortal man.”


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