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Australia’s Low Pollution Future The economics of climate change mitigation New Zealand, February 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Australia’s Low Pollution Future The economics of climate change mitigation New Zealand, February 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Australia’s Low Pollution Future The economics of climate change mitigation New Zealand, February 2009

2 The Treasury 2 Outline of Presentation Policy context Analytical approach Modelling framework Results

3 The Treasury 3 Global Policy Context UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992) –Goal is to prevent dangerous human interference with climate system Kyoto Protocol (1997) –Quantitative targets for Annex B (developed) countries for –Australia’s target: 108% of 1990 levels Negotiations underway on post-2012 framework

4 The Treasury 4 Australian Policy context The Australian Government’s climate change policy is built on three pillars: –Reducing Australia’s emissions –Adapting to climate change we can’t avoid –Helping to shape a global solution Garnaut Climate Change Review Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS) from 2010 –White Paper released in December 2008

5 The Treasury 5 Treasury Analysis during 2008 Garnaut Climate Change Review –Independent review –Treasury undertook mitigation cost analysis –Review undertook climate impacts analysis First set of analysis for Australia

6 The Treasury 6 Garnaut Climate Change Review Framework The Review’s analysis compared: –the costs of climate change (no mitigation); and –the benefits of mitigation Types of costs and benefits: –Type 1: Currently measurable market impacts –Type 2: Market impacts not readily measurable –Type 3: Insurance value against high damages –Type 4: Non market impacts CGE modelling explored Type 1 and Type 2 impact costs

7 The Treasury 7 Garnaut Review: Net impact of climate change on Australia GNP Australia’s Gross National Product Note: Includes Type 1 and 2 costs, but not type 3 and 4. Source: 550ppm scenario, The Garnaut Climate Change Review, pg 265

8 The Treasury 8 Garnaut Review: Aim for 450ppm or 550ppm? Source: The Garnaut Climate Change Review, pg 270 Note: The figures give the discounted costs as a percentage of discounted GNP. The ‘450 premium’ is the Excess of the 450 ppm cost over the 550 ppm cost. Costs in GTEM are gross of mitigation; costs in MMRF Net costs (gross costs net of Type 1 and Type 2 benefits). MMRF modelled results are adjusted to include Type 2 costs.

9 The Treasury 9 Treasury Analysis during 2008 Garnaut Climate Change Review –Independent review –Treasury undertook mitigation cost analysis –Review undertook climate impacts analysis First set of analysis for Australia Australian Government Report –Treasury undertook mitigation cost analysis –Support for Government’s medium-term target range announced in White Paper Reduction of between 5-15 per cent below 2000 levels by 2020 and 60 per cent below 2000 levels by 2050

10 The Treasury 10 Modelling Framework Suite of economic models approach: –Global –National –Sectoral –Household Generate an integrated set of projections Australia in a global context Global emission budget derived from stabilisation goals ( ppm CO 2 -e) Emission trading a proxy for all mitigation policies

11 The Treasury 11 Modelling Framework CGE Models that include Australia –Two global (G-cubed and GTEM) –One more detailed on Australia (MMRF) Bottom ‑ up models for key emissions intensive sectors –Electricity (MMA), transport (ESM) and land ‑ use and forestry (ABARE, GCOMAP) Short-term price and household distributional impacts using input-output and household level data (PRISMOD, PRISMOD-Dist) Input assumptions represent central estimate within range of possible values

12 The Treasury 12 Linking of Models

13 The Treasury 13 Issues in Linking Models Different levels of aggregation –Mapping analysis Different databases –Conversions required Different economic theory –Potential adjustments to model structure/shocks Role of international drivers –Carbon prices, export prices, world demand, technology

14 The Treasury 14 Economic Analysis - Scenarios Reference scenario

15 The Treasury 15 Reference Scenario Assumptions World and Australia –GDP Population –UN projections Productivity –Convergence? –Issues around MER vs PPP Energy efficiency and role of technology Household tastes and development patterns Global energy prices Australia’s terms of trade

16 The Treasury 16 Summary of Reference Scenario Continued strong trend economic growth –Rising per capita incomes –Slowing population growth Continued reliance on fossil fuels for energy Strong emissions growth –Global emissions more than double current levels by 2050 Does not include climate change impacts

17 The Treasury 17 Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions (reference scenario) Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM; CCSP, 2007; OECD, 2008; IPCC, 2000; Garnaut et al., 2008a.

18 The Treasury 18 Emission Intensity (reference scenario)

19 The Treasury 19 GDP Per Capita (reference scenario) Source: Treasury projections.

20 The Treasury 20 Emissions by Region (reference scenario) Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM Emission intensity of GDPEmissions per capita

21 The Treasury 21 Land-use Change and Forestry (reference scenario) Cumulative global land-use change and forestry emissions since 2005 Note: Negative numbers indicate emissions, positive numbers indicate sequestration. These estimates do not include emissions from land-use change in Australia. Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates from GCOMAP, 2008.

22 The Treasury 22 Other Emission Intensive Sectors (reference scenario) Growth of other emission-intensive sectors Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM

23 The Treasury 23 Global Financial Crisis Source: IMF World Economic Outlook Update January 2009 and Treasury G7 Trend GDPG7 GDP IMF Forecasts US $trillion

24 The Treasury 24 Economic Analysis - Scenarios Reference scenario Four main policy scenarios –Two scenarios focus on CPRS Design based on Green Paper Staged global action over period –CPRS -5 consistent with 550 ppm concentration levels –CPRS -15 consistent with 510 ppm concentration levels –Two scenarios developed with Garnaut Climate Change Review More stylised unified global action from 2013 National targets based on per capita approach –Garnaut -10 consistent with 550 ppm concentration levels –Garnaut -25 consistent with 450 ppm concentration levels Sensitivity analysis on key assumptions

25 The Treasury 25 Global Features of Scenarios Source: Treasury estimates from MAGICC and GTEM

26 The Treasury 26 Global Emission Pathways Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM

27 The Treasury 27 CPRS Emission Allocations Change from reference scenario emissions Source: CPRS -5 scenario

28 The Treasury 28 Garnaut Emission Allocations Per capita emissions in 2012 Source: Garnaut -10 scenario

29 The Treasury 29 Global Emission Allocations Note: Allocations in G Cubed are calculated using the same policy rules, but some differences arise owing to differences in the database used in the model. GTEM’s emissions database is from Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM.

30 The Treasury 30 National Emission Allocations Note: (a) Commonwealth of Independent States Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM.

31 The Treasury 31 Per Capita Emission Allocation Source: Australian Government, Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme White Paper.

32 The Treasury 32 Global Emission Prices Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM.

33 The Treasury 33 Interpreting Results LevelChange from reference Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF, CPRS -5 scenario

34 The Treasury 34 Interpreting Results Each of these statements report exactly the same economic impact for a hypothetical policy GDP growth is 0.1 per cent per year lower over 50 years GDP is $208 billion lower in 2050 GDP is 4.7 per cent lower in 2050 Cumulative GDP loss is 3 per cent of total GDP over 50 years GDP is 4.4 times higher in 2052 instead of 2050

35 The Treasury 35 GTEM: Gross World Product Change from reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM. GWP per capita grows 2.6 per cent per year in the policy scenarios versus 2.7 per cent in the reference scenario

36 The Treasury 36 Headline World Results Relative to reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM Scenario/sourceGWP reduction Target in 2020 in 2050 per cent ppm CPRS CPRS Garnaut Garnaut

37 The Treasury 37 G-cubed: Gross World Product Change from reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from G-Cubed. GWP per capita grows 2.6 per cent per year in the policy scenarios versus 2.7 per cent in the reference scenario

38 The Treasury 38 Headline World Results Relative to reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from G-Cubed Scenario/sourceGWP reduction Target in 2020 in 2050 per cent ppm CPRS CPRS Garnaut Garnaut

39 The Treasury 39 GNP costs – Annex B countries Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM

40 The Treasury 40 Contribution of international income transfers to GNP CPRS -5 scenario in 2050 Note: The difference between GNP and income transfers is the GDP impact. Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM United States European Union China Russia + CIS Japan India Canada Australia Indonesia South Africa Other South and East Asia OPEC Rest of world GNPIncome transfers Per cent contribution to GNP

41 The Treasury 41 Global Land-use Change and Forestry Cumulative global sequestration Note: Sequestration rates vary from year to year, depending on the amount of land planted, growth rates, harvesting and other factors. Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates from GCOMAP ReferenceCPRS -5CPRS -15Garnaut -10Garnaut -25 Gt CO 2 2

42 The Treasury 42 Timing sensitivities In a world where all countries delay action the short-term benefits are quickly outweighed by additional long-term costs In a world where emissions pricing is introduced gradually the costs are lower for early actors. By 2050 –GDP costs for early movers are 15 per cent lower than when everyone acts together –GDP costs for late movers are 20 per cent higher than when everyone acts together In a world where revisions to action occur it seems better to err on going harder earlier

43 The Treasury 43 Cost of Delay in Global Mitigation Change from Garnaut -10 scenario Note: GWP level change from the Garnaut 10 scenario and a sensitivity where global action is delayed from 2013 to 2020, but achieves the same 550 ppm CO2-e concentration level by Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM GWP deviations from 2013 start Per cent

44 The Treasury 44 Revising Global Action Compared with corresponding stabilisation scenario Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM.

45 The Treasury 45 Headline Australian Results EmissionsReal GNP per capita Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF GNP per capita grows 1.1 per cent per year in the policy scenarios versus 1.2 per cent in the reference scenario

46 The Treasury 46 Comparison of Cost Estimates Treasury scenarios versus other recent Australian studies Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF; Climate Institute (Hatfield Dodds et al, 2007); Allen Consulting Group (2006); ABARE (Ahamaad et al, 2006); and Concept Economics (2008).

47 The Treasury 47 Australia’s Carbon Price Note: Price in 2005 Australian dollars. Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF

48 The Treasury 48 Australian Emissions and Trade Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF, CPRS -5 scenario CPRS -5 scenario

49 The Treasury 49 Sectoral Mitigation Efforts Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF, CPRS -5 scenario CPRS -5 scenario

50 The Treasury 50 Sectoral Impacts Deviations are relative to the reference scenario Few industries face large falls –Aluminium and refineries face significant falls Key drivers: –Global demand –Exchange rates and competitiveness –Shifts to low-emission technologies –Relative emission intensity –Domestic demand Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF

51 The Treasury 51 Sectoral Impacts Relative to reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from MMRF

52 The Treasury 52 Carbon Leakage Little evidence of carbon leakage –Carbon prices are not high enough to induce significant industry relocation –Shielding helps ease the transition to a low- emission economy for shielded sectors Carbon leakage is likely to be overestimated in the models used –GTEM and MMRF are not forward-looking –Relocation costs are not taken into account

53 The Treasury 53 Australian Electricity Generation CPRS -5 scenario

54 The Treasury 54 Renewables and the RET Source: MMA

55 The Treasury 55 Carbon Capture and Storage Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is assumed to be technically possible from 2020 But CCS is only deployed when it is commercial to do so –Ranges from 2026 to 2033 in the policy scenarios Sensitivities surrounding CCS –No CCS available Australian costs 25% and world costs 10% higher in 2050 –More effective CCS technology Australian costs 10% lower in 2050

56 The Treasury 56 Sectoral Impacts - Coal Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM Gross outputShare of global trade

57 The Treasury 57 Comparison of CCS costs

58 The Treasury 58 Technology Sensitivities Range Australian GNP – Change from reference scenario Source: Treasury estimates from GTEM

59 The Treasury 59 Road Transport Fuel Mix Source: CSIRO, BITRE and Treasury

60 The Treasury 60 Forestry Source: ABARE, DCC, BRS Australian additional land under forestry

61 The Treasury 61 Household Impacts Household incomes continue to grow strongly in all scenarios modelled Average ‘morning-after’ impact in 2010 of per cent in CPRS scenarios –The range across different household types is around 1 per cent The Australian Government has committed to assisting households, including increasing benefit payments and other forms of assistance as part of White Paper

62 The Treasury 62 Key Findings The Treasury’s modelling demonstrates that: –early global action is less expensive than later action; –a market-based approach allows robust economic growth into the future even as emissions fall; and –many of Australia’s industries will maintain or improve their competitiveness under an international agreement to combat climate change. Report is available from:

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