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ASTR 1101-001 Spring 2008 Joel E. Tohline, Alumni Professor 247 Nicholson Hall [Slides from Lecture20]

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Presentation on theme: "ASTR 1101-001 Spring 2008 Joel E. Tohline, Alumni Professor 247 Nicholson Hall [Slides from Lecture20]"— Presentation transcript:

1 ASTR Spring 2008 Joel E. Tohline, Alumni Professor 247 Nicholson Hall [Slides from Lecture20]

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12 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions upward –Absorption of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Ionization possible

13 Wavelength and Frequency Wavelength = Frequency = c = speed of light = c

14 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions downward –Spontaneous Emission of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional de-excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Recombination is opposite of ionization –Stimulated emission also possible

15 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions upward –Absorption of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Ionization possible

16 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions downward –Spontaneous Emission of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional de-excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Recombination is opposite of ionization –Stimulated emission also possible

17 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions upward –Absorption of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Ionization possible

18 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions downward –Spontaneous Emission of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional de-excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Recombination is opposite of ionization –Stimulated emission also possible

19 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions downward –Spontaneous Emission of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional de-excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Recombination is opposite of ionization –Stimulated emission also possible

20 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions upward –Absorption of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Ionization possible

21 Light and Atomic Transitions Electron orbital transitions downward –Spontaneous Emission of a photon (of appropriate energy, frequency, wavelength) –Collisional de-excitation ( rate and effectiveness of collisions depends on density and temperature of gas ) –Recombination is opposite of ionization –Stimulated emission also possible

22 Kirchhoff’s Laws Hot dense gas produces a continuous spectrum ( a complete rainbow of colors ) Hot transparent gas produces an emission line spectrum Cool transparent gas in front of a source of continuous spectrum produces an absorption line spectrum.

23 Kirchhoff’s Laws Hot dense gas produces a continuous spectrum ( a complete rainbow of colors ) Hot transparent gas produces an emission line spectrum Cool transparent gas in front of a source of continuous spectrum produces an absorption line spectrum.

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25 Kirchhoff’s Laws Hot dense gas produces a continuous spectrum ( a complete rainbow of colors ) Hot transparent gas produces an emission line spectrum Cool transparent gas in front of a source of continuous spectrum produces an absorption line spectrum.

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29 Kirchhoff’s Laws Hot dense gas produces a continuous spectrum ( a complete rainbow of colors ) Hot transparent gas produces an emission line spectrum Cool transparent gas in front of a source of continuous spectrum produces an absorption line spectrum.

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