Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Food Web of the Estuary How do plants and animals of the estuary get the energy they need to move and grow?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Food Web of the Estuary How do plants and animals of the estuary get the energy they need to move and grow?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Food Web of the Estuary How do plants and animals of the estuary get the energy they need to move and grow?

2 Green plants can change sunlight energy into food (chemical) energy. The sun is the source of energy for all living things.

3 Producers make their own food using energy from sunlight. This is called photosynthesis. algae eelgrass Microscopic phytoplankton

4 carbon dioxide water Sunlight energy sugar

5 Animals get energy from eating plants or other animals. They are called consumers. Primary consumers (herbivores) eat plants. Secondary consumers (carnivores) eat other animals.

6 Omnivores eat both plants and animals!

7 Energy is transferred from plants to animals through Food Chains. Sunlight energy

8 Phytoplankton are floating microscopic plants. They are very important estuary producers. Phytoplankton are eaten by floating animals, zooplankton - and by bigger animals like snails, clams, and barnacles. Phytoplankton Zooplankton Small but Mighty

9 Plants and animals: 1.Burn energy when they move and grow. 2.Store energy in their bodies. 3.Release unused energy as waste and heat. food energy in Undigested food energy out Energy used for swimming Food energy stored in fish - ready to be eaten

10 In an estuary, not every animal or plant gets eaten. Plants like eelgrass die back each year, just like the grass in a field. This stored-up energy is still important.

11 When a plant or animal dies, it rots. Bacteria breaks down the stored energy into food that can be used by other animals. Detritus: dead and rotting bits of plants and animals Detritivore: an animal that eats detritus.

12 Estuary food chains often overlap, making food webs.

13 Relative Importance Of Food Web Linkages Primary (75-100% of Total) Secondary (50-74% of Total) Tertiary (25-49% of Total) Incidental (0-24% of Total) Pacific Staghorn Sculpin Great Blue Heron Penpoint Gunnel Sharpnose Sculpin Small Fish (inc. herring, perch) Buffalo Sculpin Chum Salmon (juv.) Tubenose Poacher Mysids Gammarid Amphipods Detritus Cumaceans Padded Sculpin Tunicates Starry Flounder (juv.) Sanderlings,Long & Short-billed Dowitchers, Greater Yellowlegs Saddleback Gunnel Benthic Meiofauna Hippolytid, Crangonid, And Penaeid Shrimp Polychaete Annelids Gastropod Molluscs Saltmarsh Plants & Eelgrass Phytoplankton Microphytic Algae Whimbrel, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Pintail, Western Sandpiper English Sole (juv.) Crescent Gunnel Nemerteans Tidepool Sculpin Shiner Perch Brachyuran Crabs Harpacticoid Copepods Snake Prickleback Gastropod Molluscs Anthozoans Bivalve Molluscs Snow Goose, Canada Goose, black Brant, American coot Flabelliferan Isopods Macrophytic Algae Silverspotted Sculpin Tanaids Bay Pipefish Valviferan Isopods From Simenstad et al Because many animals eat more than one thing, tracing energy through the estuary can get messy.

14 Are you part of the Estuary Food Web?

15


Download ppt "Food Web of the Estuary How do plants and animals of the estuary get the energy they need to move and grow?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google