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1 The Q p weak Experiment: A Search for Physics beyond the Standard Model via parity-violating e-p scattering at low Q 2 S. Page, PAVIO6, Milos, Greece.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The Q p weak Experiment: A Search for Physics beyond the Standard Model via parity-violating e-p scattering at low Q 2 S. Page, PAVIO6, Milos, Greece."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The Q p weak Experiment: A Search for Physics beyond the Standard Model via parity-violating e-p scattering at low Q 2 S. Page, PAVIO6, Milos, Greece

2 2 Parity violating scattering asymmetry M EM M NC Interference gives parity violating scattering asymmetry for polarized beam “hadronic form factor” correction Q 2 Dependence : this morning’s talks

3 3 What is the proton’s weak charge and why are we measuring it? Q p Weak = 1 – 4sin 2 θ W, which has never been directly measured in a precision experiment, sets the scale of the proton’s coupling to W and Z bosons that mediate the weak interaction: The weak mixing angle, sin 2 θ W, is predicted to vary with the energy scale (Q) at which it is measured, due to electroweak radiative corrections that are sensitive to the possible existence of additional force carriers beyond the Standard Model -- e.g. right handed Z bosons etc. sin 2 θ W is well determined at the Z-pole from high energy collider experiments but lower energy precision measurements have not yet been made The Q weak experiment at Jefferson Lab will enable us to check the predicted “running” of sin 2 θ W, by making a precision measurement at low energy, placing limits on physics beyond the Standard Model.

4 4 Energy Scale dependence of the weak mixing angle: Significance: planned error bar corresponds to a 10  measurement of the Standard Model prediction Standard Model Prediction Erler, Kurylov & Ramsey-Musolf, Phys. Rev. D 68, (2003) SLAC E158 Cs atomic parity violation NuTeV Q weak goal error bar

5 5 JLab Qweak (proposed) - Qweak measurement will provide a stringent stand alone constraint on Lepto-quark based extensions to the SM. Q p weak (semi-leptonic) and E158 (pure leptonic) together make a powerful program to search for and identify new physics. SLAC E158 Comparison of proton and electron weak charge sensitivities

6 6 Impact via “Model-independent Semi-Leptonic Analysis” Effective electron-quark neutral current Lagrangian: Large ellipse (existing data): SLAC e-D (DIS) MIT-Bates 12 C (elastic) Cesium atomic parity violation Red ellipse: Impact of Q p Weak measurement (centroid assumes agreement with the Standard Model)  C 1u  C 1u (exp)  C 1u (SM)  C 1d  C 1d (exp)  C 1d (SM) Erler, Kurylov & Ramsey-Musolf: Phys.Rev.D68:016006,2003

7 7 Experimental sensitivity: Precision measurement: Physics Asymmetry: Expected value: Experimental considerations: need high statistics  integrating detector system measured asymmetry is P A  beam polarization P should be large & well measured somebody else has to measure B(Q 2 ) for us (done ) so that we can subtract it we need to know the detector-response-weighted and to interpret the data helicity correlated systematic errors must be kept below 5 x 10 -9

8 8 Anticipated Q p Weak Uncertainties   A phys /A phys  Q p weak /Q p weak Statistical (2200 hours production) 1.8% 2.9% Systematic: Hadronic structure uncertainties % Beam polarimetry 1.0% 1.6% Absolute Q 2 determination 0.7% 1.1% Backgrounds 0.5% 0.8% Helicity-correlated Beam Properties 0.5%0.8% _________________________________________________________ Total 2.3% 4.3%   A phys /A phys  Q p weak /Q p weak Statistical (2200 hours production) 1.8% 2.9% Systematic: Hadronic structure uncertainties % Beam polarimetry 1.0% 1.6% Absolute Q 2 determination 0.7% 1.1% Backgrounds 0.5% 0.8% Helicity-correlated Beam Properties 0.5%0.8% _________________________________________________________ Total 2.3% 4.3% An additional uncertainty associated with QCD corrections applied to the extraction of sin 2  W : it raises  sin 2  W / sin 2  W from 0.2% to 0.3%. An additional uncertainty associated with QCD corrections applied to the extraction of sin 2  W : it raises  sin 2  W / sin 2  W from 0.2% to 0.3%.

9 9 Hadronic Form Factors hadronic: (31% of asymmetry) - contains G  E,M G Z E,M Constrained by HAPPEX, G 0, MAMI PVA4 hadronic: (31% of asymmetry) - contains G  E,M G Z E,M Constrained by HAPPEX, G 0, MAMI PVA4 axial: (4% of asymmetry) - contains G e A, has large electroweak radiative corrections. Constrained by G 0 and SAMPLE axial: (4% of asymmetry) - contains G e A, has large electroweak radiative corrections. Constrained by G 0 and SAMPLE Young et al., arXiv:nucl-ex/ Hadronic FF’s at Q 2 = 0.1 GeV 2  extrapolation to Q 2 = 0.03 GeV 2 gives contribution to Q weak (see Ross Young’s talk !)

10 10 ~~ close    on track 85% 85 – 87 % Achieved at injector Beam Property Requirements

11 11 Main apparatus: target plus toroidal magnetic spectrometer beam double collimator system selects scattering angle/ accepted Q 2 range toroidal magnetic spectrometer: elastically scattered electrons are bent away from the beamline and focused onto the detector plane photons hit here inelastic electrons quartz detectors for elastic e- LH 2 target

12 12 Q weak LH 2 target 2500 W cooling power ! raster size 4 x 4 mm 2  /  < Hz Requirements: Noise spectra measured in Hall A -- great improvement at higher spin flip frequency (up to 250 Hz implemented at the polarized source already) solid target liquid target

13 13 Region 3: Vertical Drift chambers Region 2: Horizontal drift chamber location Region 1: GEM Gas Electron Multiplier Quartz Cerenkov Bars (insensitive to non-relativistic particles) Collimator System Mini-torus QTOR Magnet Trigger Scintillator Lumi Monitors e - beam E beam = GeV I beam = 180 μ A Polarization ~85% Target = 2.5 kW Layout drawing: main asymmetry (We will turn down the beam current and track particles to determine, ) plus tracking apparatus for,

14 14 View of Q p Weak Apparatus collapsed along beam direction - Simulated Events Central scattering angle: ~8° ± 2 Phi Acceptance: > 50% of 2  Average Q²: GeV 2 Acceptance averaged asymmetry: –0.29 ppm Integrated Rate (per detector): ~900 MHz Inelastic/Elastic ratio: ~0.01% Central scattering angle: ~8° ± 2 Phi Acceptance: > 50% of 2  Average Q²: GeV 2 Acceptance averaged asymmetry: –0.29 ppm Integrated Rate (per detector): ~900 MHz Inelastic/Elastic ratio: ~0.01% Elastic e-p envelope close up: distribution across top detector bar

15 15 Main Detector and Electronics System Focal plane detector requirements: Insensitivity to background , n, . Radiation hardness (expect > 300 kRad). Operation at ~ counting statistics nonlinearity less than 1% Fused Silica (synthetic quartz) Cerenkov detector. Plan to use 18 cm x 200 cm x 1.25 cm quartz bars read out at both ends by S20 photocathode PMTs (expect ~ 50 pe/event) n =1.47,  Cerenkov =47°, total internal reflection  tir =43° reflectivity = Electronics (LANL/TRIUMF design): Normally operates in integration mode. Will have connection for pulse mode. Low electronic noise contribution. compared to counting statistics. 18 bit ADC will allow for 4X over sampling

16 16 Determination of Average Q 2 ~10 nA e - beam Region 1: GEM Gas Electron Multiplier Region 2 : 2 Horizontal Drift chambers Region 3: 2 Vertical Drift chambers Shielding wall Quartz Cerenkov bar distribution: = 0.03 GeV 2 reduce beam current use tracking system read out quartz light yield

17 17 Precision Polarimetry Present limitations – existing Moller polarimeter -I Max ~ 10  A. -At higher currents the Fe target depolarizes. -Measurement is destructive Møller upgrade: -Measure P beam at 100  A or higher, quasi-continuously -Trick: kicker + strip or wire target Schematic of planned new Hall C Compton polarimeter. Existing Hall C Møller can achieve 1% (statistics) in a few minutes. See talks on Saturday: Jurgen Diefenbach (Compton) Dave Mack (Moller)

18 18 Summary and Outlook We will measure the proton’s weak charge, Q W p to  4% and hence determine sin 2  W to  0.3% from low Q 2 parity-violating elastic scattering at Jefferson Lab. Experiment approved with “A” rating, 2002 & reaffirmed 2005 JLab schedule: installation in 2009 and 18 months on the floor before 12 GeV upgrade Progress on experiment design, simulations, prototyping and construction is underway: magnet coils at MIT support stand

19 19 Region 1 GEM prototype chamber rotator Rad Hard preamp collaboration meeting

20 20 Qweak Collaboration Spokespersons Carlini, Roger (Principal Investigator) - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Finn, J. Michael - College of William and Mary Kowalski, Stanley - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page, Shelley - University of Manitoba Qweak Collaboration Members Armstrong, David - College of William and Mary Averett, Todd - College of William and Mary Birchall, James - University of Manitoba Bosted, Peter – Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Botto, Tancredi - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Bowman, David – Los Alamos National Laboratory Bruell, Antje - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Cates, Gordon – University of Virginia Chattopadhyay, Swapan - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Davis, Charles - TRIUMF Doornbos, J. - TRIUMF Dow, Karen - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dunne, James - Mississippi State University Ent, Rolf - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Erler, Jens - University of Mexico Falk, Willie - University of Manitoba Farkhondeh, Manouchehr - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Forest, Tony - Louisiana Tech University Franklin, Wilbur - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Gaskell, David - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Gericke, Michael – University of Manitoba and TRIUMF Grimm, Klaus - College of William and Mary Hersman, F. W. - University of New Hampshire Holtrop, Maurik - University of New Hampshire Johnston, Kathleen - Louisiana Tech University Jones, Richard - University of Connecticut Joo, Kyungseon - University of Connecticut Keppel, Cynthia - Hampton University Khol, Michael - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Korkmaz, Elie - University of Northern British Columbia Lee, Lawrence - TRIUMF Liang, Yongguang - Ohio University Lung, Allison - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Mack, David - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Majewski, Stanislaw - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Mammei, Juliette - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ. Mammei, Russell - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ. Martin, Jeffery W. – University of Winnipeg Meekins, David – Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Mkrtchyan, Hamlet - Yerevan Physics Institute Morgan, Norman - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ. Myers, Catherine – George Washington University Opper, Allena – George Washington Univ. Penttila, Seppo - Los Alamos National Laboratory Pitt, Mark - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ. Poelker, B. (Matt) - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Prok, Yelena – Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ramsay, Des - University of Manitoba and TRIUMF Ramsey-Musolf, Michael - California Institute of Technology Roche, Julie - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Simicevic, Neven - Louisiana Tech University Smith, Gregory - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Smith, Timothy - Dartmouth College Souder, Paul –Syracuse University Suleiman, Riad – Virginia Polytechnic & State Univ. Tsentalovich, Evgeni - Massachusetts Institute of Technology van Oers, W.T.H. - University of Manitoba Wang, Jie Pan – University of Winnipeg Wang, Peiqing – University of Manitoba Wells, Steven - Louisiana Tech University Wood, Stephen Thomas - Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Zhu, Hongguo - University of New Hampshire Ziskin, Vitaly – MIT Bates Linear Accelerator Laboratory Zorn, Carl - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Zwart, Townsend - Massachusetts Institute of Technology The Q weak Collaboration:

21 21

22 22 The Q p weak Luminosity Monitor Luminosity monitor  Symmetric array of 8 quartz Cerenkov detectors instrument with rad hard vacuum photo diodes & integrating readout at small  (~ 1.2  ). Low Q 2, high rates ~29 GHz/octant. Expected signal components: 12 GHz e-e Moeller, 11 GHz e-p elastic, EM showers 6 GHz. Expected lumi monitor asymmetry << main detector asymmetry. Expected lumi monitor statistical error ~ (1/6) main detector statistical error. Useful for:  Sensitive check on helicity-correlated beam parameter corrections procedure.  Regress out target density fluctuations. MAMI A4 “LUMI” Monitor Similar to


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