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ONLINE ORIENTATION Office Orientation. What is the UNC Environmental, Health and Safety department? The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH)

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Presentation on theme: "ONLINE ORIENTATION Office Orientation. What is the UNC Environmental, Health and Safety department? The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH)"— Presentation transcript:

1 ONLINE ORIENTATION Office Orientation

2 What is the UNC Environmental, Health and Safety department? The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is committed to providing a safe and healthful environment for all persons associated with the University, including faculty, staff, students, visitors, and members of the Chapel Hill community. `The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) Department of Environment, Health & Safety supports the University's core mission of teaching, research, and service by providing comprehensive environmental, health, and safety services to the University community. This includes education through training and consultation, maintaining a safe environment through recognizing and controlling health and safety hazards, ensuring a process of regulatory compliance, and minimizing future potential liabilities. (See list of regulating entities here.) 2

3 Here are just some of the responsibilities & services EHS provides to our campus and community.  Biological Safety  Chemical Safety  Emergency Response  Environmental Hygiene  Environmental Management  Environmental Permitting  Fire Safety  Health and Safety Training  Laboratory Inspections  Laboratory Safety  Occupational Hygiene  Radiation Safety  Regulatory Compliance  Seasonal Influenza Vaccinations  Shipping Regulations  Waste Management  Workers’ Compensation  University Employee Occupational Health Clinic 3

4 UNC-CH Safety & Health Program In accordance with University policy and North Carolina General Statute Article 63, each state agency must have a written health and safety program (UNC Workplace Requirement). The Environment, Health and Safety manual along with other manuals, such as Radiation Safety, Laboratory Safety and Biological Safety, serve as the University's written health and safety program (UNC Workplace Requirement Program). These manuals provide University employees with the necessary guidance in maintaining a safe work environment. You can find the manuals here, or by going to “Manuals” on the EHS web site.here 4

5 UNC-CH Safety & Health Program The UNC Safety & Health Program includes:  New employee training to help with the identification of and correction of hazards,  Reviewing workplace incidents and develop ways to eliminate or minimize hazards,  Employee input through participation in UNC health and safety committees. These committees perform workplace inspections, review injury and illness records, make advisory recommendations to the administration.  UNC employees should contact EHS or any committee member regarding safety concerns. 5

6 UNC-CH Safety & Health Program The UNC health and safety committees report to the Chancellor through the following administrative structure. For more information about the committees, go here, or go to the EHS website and click on “Committees.”here If you are interested in serving on one of the committees please contact the EHS office at (919)

7 Pre-test 1. The UNC Environment, Health and Safety department has the responsibility to oversee the UNC-CH health and safety program. T/F 2. In accordance with University policy and North Carolina General Statute Article 63, each state agency must have a written health and safety program (UNC Workplace Requirement Program). T/F 7

8 Pre-test 8 3. The Environment, Health and Safety department is responsible for administering programs on: Office and workplace safety laboratory safety fire safety emergency response environmental hygiene waste management employee health Worker’s Compensation Program and other programs that impact employee health and safety. all of the above.

9 Pre-test 9 4. UNC has workplace safety committees that encourage employee input and participation and are responsible for workplace inspections, reviewing injury and illness records and making advisory recommendations to the administration. T/F

10 What you can do about fire safety in your workplace.  Regularly inspect your work area for the following:  Electrical hazards  Storage in hallways  Blocked exit ways  Adequate lighting of exits  General housekeeping  Inspecting your work area can prevent a fire from occurring and provide employees with a safe passage in the event of a fire.  Immediately report any fire hazards or other safety concerns to the department of Environment, Health and Safety at (919) UNC’s Fire Safety program is based on NFPA 101 Life Safety Code, N.C. Fire Prevention Code, and OSHA 1910 Subpart E.

11 The University’s Emergency Action Plan  EHS has a general Emergency Action Plan for the University to follow that includes what to do in a fire emergency.  This plan includes the following:  Posting of planned evacuation routes  Procedures to follow in the event of a fire or emergency  Procedures to account for employees after evacuation  Procedures for employees who remain to operate critical equipment in an emergency 11

12 Getting out Safely  If a fire or other emergency occurs in your building, employees must know two Means of Egress (exit).  OSHA defines Means of Egress as “A continuous and unobstructed way of exit travel from any point in a building or structure to a public way.”  The three main components of Means of Egress are:  The way of Exit Access  The Exit  The way of Exit Discharge 12

13 Getting out Safely Exit Discharge: The exit from a building to a public way. Exit Access: The area in which an employee uses as their means of exiting to an exit. Exit: The protected way of travel to the exit discharge. 13

14 Building Evacuation Procedures  Employees should know at least two evacuation routes for their designated work area and in any area they frequent often.  Employees are encouraged to evaluate the building evacuation areas daily to ensure that there are no obstructions.  If obstructions are found, please report it to EHS immediately at (919)

15 Remembering RACE could save your life  If a fire emergency occurs in your workplace, it is vital that you are prepared to react.  The acronym RACE provides the basic steps of the Emergency Action Plan: Remove or rescue individuals in immediate danger. Activate the nearest fire pull station and call 911. Confine the fire by closing windows, vents and doors. Evacuate to a safe area (know the evacuation routes for your area). 15

16 Emergency Coordinators and their role in campus safety. Emergency Coordinator(EC) have been designated for all occupied buildings. Each EC is responsible for assisting in the safe evacuation of employees. The EC completes an information document that responders can use in an emergency. The document lists:  Evacuation monitors’ names  Employee names and phone numbers occupying building  Location of employees needing assistance  Rooms containing hazardous material  Equipment needing special attention To obtain the name of your building’s Emergency Coordinator contact the Fire Safety section at EHS at (919)

17 17  In an emergency, each Emergency Coordinator is responsible for the following in accordance with the University Emergency Plan:  Sweep through assigned area to alert occupants that an evacuation is in process.  Assist building occupants needing special assistance  Report to the University Emergency Command Sector with emergency information card  Advise emergency personnel regarding building contents  Account for all employees by meeting building occupants at the assembly area  Advise building occupants regarding situation and when re- entry is permitted  Advise Facilities Services personnel in cleanup operations. Emergency Coordinators and their role in campus safety.

18 Currently University buildings are equipped with Type ABC fire extinguishers, that extinguish ordinary combustible items, flammable liquids and electrical fires. (See below.) University buildings are equipped with Type ABC & D fire extinguishers, except in computer labs or mechanical rooms which have CO 2 extinguishers. Fire Extinguishers in the workplace 18 ClassFire TypeExtinguisher Contains Class AOrdinary combustible products such as paper, cloth or wood Water Class BFlammable Liquids such as petroleum base oil, solvents, greases, and gasses Dry chemicals such as carbon dioxide or halogenated agents Class CElectricalDry chemicals such as carbon dioxide or halogenated agents Class DCombustible Metals (ex: magnesium sodium) Special liquid or dry powder agent

19 Operating a fire extinguisher It is beneficial to know how a fire extinguisher is used. Remembering the acronym PASS will assist in the proper use of a fire extinguisher.  Pull the pin between the handles.  Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire.  Squeeze the handles together.  Sweep the extinguisher from side to side at the base of the fire. To request hands-on fire extinguisher training for your staff, call

20 Fire Safety and Electrical Hazards Electrical Hazards include the following:  Defective outlets  Broken plugs and frayed cords  Plugs with missing ground prongs  Missing covers on junction boxes  Missing covers on wall receptacles  Use of electrical “octopuses” to obtain more outlets  Do not use extension cords through doorways or in place of permanent wiring.  Make sure all electrical outlets are covered before spraying room or floors with water based cleaners/disinfectant. 20

21 Fire Safety Reminders  Everyone is responsible for keeping the work area safe from fires.  Review your evacuation routes to ensure that exits and passageways are unobstructed.  Practice good general housekeeping.  Store flammable liquids and combustible material properly.  Eliminate all electrical hazards.  Immediately report any fire hazards or other safety concerns to the department of Environment, Health and Safety at (919)  For more information about fire safety, go to 21

22 Fire Safety Pretest 1. Employees should know at least two evacuation routes for their designated work area and in any area they frequent often. T/F 2. PASS is an acronym that stands for the proper use of a fire extinguisher.  Pull the pin between the handles.  Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire.  Squeeze the handles together.  Sweep the extinguisher from side to side at the base of the fire.  T/F 3. RACE is an acronym that stands for Remove or rescue individuals in immediate danger. Activate the nearest fire pull station and call 911. Confine the fire by closing windows, vents and doors. Evacuate to a safe area (know the evacuation routes for your area). T/F 22

23 Fire Safety Pretest EHS has a general Emergency Action Plan for the University to follow that includes what to do in a fire emergency. T/F 5. Many buildings on campus have an Emergency Building Coordinator that is assigned to assist the occupants in an emergency. T/F

24 Workers’ Compensation Program Workers' Compensation benefits are available to any University employee who are:  full-time  part-time  Temporary. Workers’ Compensation benefits are available to any University employee who suffers disability through accident or illness, arising out of, and, in the scope of, his or her employment, according to the North Carolina Workers' Compensation Act. 24

25 Workers’ Compensation Program The benefits provided to University Employees include medical and leave. Medical benefits: Including all authorized medical services such as physician visit, prescriptions, physical therapy, rehabilitation, etc. Leave benefits: Provided to employees when an authorized medical provider places an employee out work. 25

26 Medical Treatment For a life-threatening injury or illness, go directly to the UNCH Emergency Department located on Manning Drive. If you have an injury or occupational illness go to the University Employee Occupational Health Clinic (UEOHC) at 145 N. Medical Drive. UEOHC hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday thru Friday, except holidays. For after-hour or weekend injuries that do not require immediate medical care, report to the UEOHC as soon as the University Health Clinic is open. For after hours or weekend needlestick/human blood or body fluid exposures, please call UEOHC at The UEOHC line will automatically forward your call to Healthlink in order to gather the appropriate information and put you in contact with the Family Practice physician covering the needlestick hotline. 26

27 On the Job Injury or Illness If you experienced an on-the-job injury or illness, you are to report the incident immediately to your supervisor, no matter how minor. You also must complete an NCIC Form 19 reporting your injury. Once the injury is reported, an incident investigation will occur to determine the cause of the incident and corrective action taken to prevent the incident from reoccurring. Please note: Failure to report an injury could result in the denial of your claim. 27

28 Workers’ Compensation Program For further information concerning University policies on workplace injuries and illnesses, refer to the Workers' Compensation pages on the EHS web site.Workers' Compensation 28

29 Workers’ Compensation Pre-test 1. Workers' Compensation benefits are available to any University employee, including full-time, part-time or temporary employees. T/F 2. If I experience an on-the-job injury or illness, I am to report the incident immediately to my supervisor, no matter how minor. T/F 3. If I am injured at work and need medical attention I required to go to the University Employee Occupational Health Clinic. If the injury is life threatening I should go to the UNCH Hospital Emergency Department. T/F 29

30 Hazard Communication Background What is OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard? OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR ), promulgated 1994, requires that employees be informed of the hazards of chemical(s) that they work with or are present in their work area.

31 OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (continued) The four elements of the program include:  Ensuring chemicals are labeled  Maintaining departmental/work unit/laboratory chemical inventories  Maintaining Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)  Training of personnel by Supervisor on the chemicals that are used or in the workplace

32 OSHA collaborates with United Nation To view details of this report, double click picture. Understanding the need for consistent classifications of hazards chemicals, OSHA decided to better align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System by adopting a common classification and labeling of chemicals.

33 Benefits of Adopting GHS There are several benefits for OSHA in adopting the Globally Harmonized system. In particular, it will provide a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets. Thus resulting in: Consistency of information provided Increase comprehension of hazards Help address literacy problems Facilitation of international trade of chemicals

34 OSHA Publishes Revised Standard In March 2012, the revised Hazard Communication Standard became law and included an established timeframe for implementation. The table below outlines the effective dates, requirements and responsible parties. Effective Completion DateRequirement(s)Who December 1, 2013Train employees on the new label elements and SDS format. Employers June 1, 2015* December 1, 2015 Comply with all modified provisions of this final rule, except: Distributors may ship products labeled by manufacturers under the old system until December 1, Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers June 1, 2016Update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards. Employers Transition PeriodComply with either 29 CFR (this final standard), or the current standard, or both All chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers

35 Benefit of HazCom2012 With the University’s mission to “serve North Carolina, the United States, and the World through teaching, research, and public service,” the new requirements under HazCom 2012 will enhance clarity for University employees positioned on campus as well as abroad.

36 HazCom2012 Requirements By December 2013, all University employees are to have received general training regarding “definitions”, “label” and “Safety Data Sheet” for chemicals under new HazCom 2012 standard. Supervisors are still required to provide job specific training to employees on the chemicals used in their area at least once and every time a new chemical is added. The training must cover proper use, handling, and personal protective equipment required for the safe handling of the hazardous chemicals.

37 Definitions HazCom 2012 will use a “specification” approach rather than a “performance-oriented” approach. Hazards will be classified thus providing a specific criteria for classification of health and physical hazards, as well as classification of mixtures. Specifically:  Appendix A defines health and physical hazards  Appendix B includes additional parameters to evaluate health hazard data  Appendix F pertains to Carcinogens

38 Labels HazCom 2012 requires chemical manufacturers and importers to provide a label that includes a harmonized product identifier, pictogram, signal word, and hazard statement for each hazard class and category. Precautionary statements must also be provided.

39 Labels - Pictograms Pictograms are required on labels to alert users of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed. Each pictogram consists of a symbol on a white background framed within a red border and represents a distinct hazard(s), such as health, physical, and environmental. The pictogram on the label is determined by the chemical hazard classification. There are nine pictograms with only the environmental pictogram being optional.

40 Labels – Distinct Hazards As previously stated, “Distinct hazards” are chemicals in which there is scientific evidence that a health, physical, and/or environmental hazards may occur.  Health Hazard - acute or chronic health affects may occur if exposed.  Physical Hazard - a combustible liquid, a compressed gas, explosive, flammable, an organic peroxide, an oxidizer, pyrophoric, unstable (reactive) or water-reactive  Environmental Hazard – pose risk or danger to the environment

41 Labels – Pictograms (Health)  Acute Toxicity (fatal and toxic)  Fatal in contact with skin  Fatal if inhaled  Fatal if swallowed  Toxic if swallowed  Toxic in contact with skin Examples: Carbon Monoxide, Ammonia, Acrylonitrile, Arsenic Skull and Cross Bones will appear on the most severely toxic chemicals. Depending on the toxicity of the chemical, the skull and crossbones indicates that the chemical may be toxic or fatal. Specifically it can mean:

42 Labels – Pictograms (Health)  May be corrosive to metals  Causes severe skin burns  Causes serious eye damage Examples: Sodium Hydroxide (lye) and Sulfuric Acid Corrosive will appear on chemicals that have corrosive properties. Depending on the properties of the chemical(s) in the product, the corrosion pictogram can mean:

43 Labels – Pictograms (Health)  Harmful if swallowed  Acute Toxicity (harmful)  Harmful in contact with skin  Skin Sensitizer  Harmful if inhaled  Respiratory Tract Irritant  Causes skin irritation  Irritant (skin and eye)  Causes serious eye irritation  May cause allergic skin reaction  Hazardous to Ozone Layer Examples: Isopropyl Alcohol, Ethyl Alcohol, Acetone Exclamation Mark will appear on chemicals with less severe toxicity. This symbol will never be used with “skull and crossbones” symbol. Depending on the health hazard, it can mean:

44 Labels – Pictograms (Health)  Carcinogen  Mutagenicity  Reproductive Toxicity  Respiratory Sensitizer  Target Organ Toxicity  Aspiration Toxicity Examples: Carbon Monoxide, Hexanes Health Hazard will appear on chemicals with less severe toxicity. This symbol will never be used with “skull and crossbones” symbol. Depending on the health hazard, it can mean:

45 Labels – Pictograms (Health/Physical) Gas Cylinder can cause fires, explosions, oxygen deficient atmospheres, toxic gas exposures as well as the innate physical hazard associated with cylinders under high pressure  Gases under pressure  Compressed gases  Liquefied gases  Refrigerated liquefied gases  Dissolved gases Examples: Butane and Propane

46 Labels – Pictograms (Physical) Exploding Bomb symbol will appear on chemicals that have explosive properties.  Unstable Explosives  Self-reactive substances and mixtures  Organic peroxides Examples: Nitroglycerine and TNT, Gunpowder, Rocket propellants, and Pyrotechnic mixtures (fireworks).

47 Labels – Pictograms (Physical)  Extremely flammable gas  Extremely flammable aerosol  Self-Heating  Flammable aerosol  Extremely flammable liquid and vapor  Highly flammable liquid and vapor  Flammable liquid and vapor  Flammable solid Examples: Butane, Pyrophorics, Organic Peroxides Flame symbol will appear on chemicals that are flammable. Depending on the properties of the chemical(s) and the product, the flame can mean:

48 Labels – Pictograms (Physical) Flame over circle symbol will appear on chemicals that are:  Oxidizers  Oxidizing gases, liquids, and solids Examples: Hydrogen Peroxide and Nitrous Oxide

49 Labels – Pictograms (Environment) Environment symbol will appear on chemicals which are acutely hazardous to fish, crustacean, or aquatic plants. This is the only symbol that is not mandatory.  Aquatic Toxicity  Acute hazards to the aquatic environment  Chronic hazards to the aquatic environment

50 Label – Signal Word A Signal Word is used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. The signal words used are:  "Danger" - used for the more severe hazards  “Warning" - used for less severe hazards.

51 Labels- Hazard Statement A Hazard Statement describes the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including where appropriate the degree of hazard. All of the applicable hazard statements must appear on the label.

52 Labels – Precautionary Statement A Precautionary Statement is a statement that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects.

53 Label – What do UNC Employees need to do? Effective June , all chemicals received at the University should have the required label. Any material transferred to another container must also have the same label versus just chemical/product name.

54 Safety Data Sheets HazCom 2012 requires Safety Data Sheets - SDS (formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets – MSDS) to use a specified 16-section standardized format. Under the new format, employees wanting information regarding Exposure Controls/Personal Protection will always refer to Section 8 of the Safety Data Sheets.

55 Safety Data Sheets To improve employee understanding, information listed on the label, like Precautionary Statement, will be same information the employee will find on the Safety Data Sheet. The standardize 16 sections is broken down as follows:

56 Safety Data Sheet – 16 Sections 1. Identification of the substance or mixture and of the supplier 2. Hazards identification 3. Composition/information on ingredients Substance/Mixture 4. First aid measures 5. Firefighting measures 6. Accidental release measures 7. Handling and storage 8. Exposure controls/personal protection 9. Physical and chemical properties 10. Stability and reactivity 11. Toxicological 12. Ecological information (non mandatory) 13. Disposal considerations (non mandatory) 14. Transport information (non mandatory) 15. Regulatory information (non mandatory) 16. Other information including information on preparation and revision of the SDS

57 Safety Data Sheets – What do UNC Employees need to do? By December 2015, distributors must provide the new format of Safety Data Sheets. Supervisors need to update the Safety Data Sheet notebooks and/or computer links in their job specific area to the newly format sheets. Remember SDS(s) must be accessible to employees at all times.

58 NC OSHA– Enforcement By June 2016, NC OSHA will begin to enforce compliance with HazCom 2012 by conducting site evaluations. Environment, Health and Safety will continue to assist University departments with the implementation of the specific requirements covered in this training.

59 Resources - OSHA’s HazCom2012 Web Page OSHA has developed an extensive web page to provide additional resources for employees at

60 Resources - Guidance & Outreach Supervisors can find printable guidance material that can be utilized when training employees. Guidance » OSHA Briefs » Fact Sheet » Quick Cards

61 Asbestos on Campus  As an employee of UNC, EHS is informing you of the presence of asbestos- containing materials in residence halls and campus buildings. Provided the materials are in good condition, they pose no health risk to the building occupants.  UNC has an Asbestos Control Policy and Program to manage asbestos on UNC's campus.  Materials containing asbestos may include flooring, ceilings, walls, thermal system insulation on tanks, pipes and other miscellaneous materials.  UNC maintains asbestos-containing materials so they do not release asbestos fibers into the air. When asbestos containing materials become damaged, isolation, repair and/or removal are implemented immediately.  The University has a staff of accredited professionals that conduct building inspections, coordinate and supervise asbestos related construction activities, perform air monitoring and provide employee training.  If you have any questions concerning asbestos in a specific building on campus, please feel free to contact EHS at to make an appointment to review the building inspection reports.

62 Common causes of accidents in an office Understanding potential hazards that may be created in the office environment is essential in preventing accidents and injuries. Some of the well-known causes of incidents in the office are:  Floors  Walkways  Electricity  Files  Storage  Equipment and Machines 62

63  Carpets can be trip hazards. If the carpet starts to wear, tear or come loose, have it repaired or removed.  Clean up spills as soon as possible and notify Facilities Services about any water leaks. Wet carpets are an ideal place to grow mold. 63 Safe Surfaces - Floors

64  Walk with caution over wet floors and when you have wet shoes. On rainy or snowy days, take a few extra minutes to wipe off your shoe soles as soon as you enter any building on campus.  Be aware of distractions. For instance, running or walking while reading can make accidents more likely. Whether you are walking across campus or around your office, always be aware of your surroundings. 64 Safe Surfaces - Floors

65 Safe Walkways  Keep trashcans, briefcases and other items out of walk spaces.  Clearly mark any difference in floor level that could cause an accident. Brightly colored tape is a great warning of a "sudden step ahead."  Ensure that glass doors have some type of marking to keep people from walking through them. 65

66 Safe Walkways  Electrical cords can be a trip hazard. Keep cords secured away from feet, walk spaces, drawers and sharp edges.  Do not tape cords down or run them underneath carpet. This can cause overheating of the wire insulation and cord damage that cannot be seen until it starts a fire. If you cannot move a cord, have a new outlet installed. In the meantime, secure the cord to the floor with cord covering strips. 66

67  Electrical equipment should be plugged directly into the wall outlet. Do not use extension cords for permanent appliances and do not use power strips at all. (Exception: Approved power strips for computer equipment.)  Keep ignitable materials away from outlets. 67 Safe Use of Electricity

68  Organize file cabinets to have frequently accessed files at waist or chest level.  Place infrequently used or heavy file loads in the bottom levels and lighter loads in the top drawers.  Do not store files on top of cabinets.  Open one drawer at a time. Opening two drawers at once can cause the entire cabinet to fall on you!  Do not put heavy items in the top drawer with nothing in the bottom. This can also cause the cabinet to tip. 68 Office and Filing Safety

69 Storage Safety  Use the proper equipment to reach high items. Step stools and ladders are small inexpensive ways to make the job easier and safer.  Do not store heavy objects above the head.  Never stand on revolving chairs or chairs with castors! 69

70 Storage Safety  Do not stack items so high that they block smoke detectors and sprinklers.  Allow for at least 18" clearance as required by NFPA to allow proper sprinkler discharge in case of a fire. 70

71 Safe Use of Equipment and Machines  Put equipment away properly when you are finished with it.  The first time you use a new piece of equipment, read the instructions and ask for instruction from someone who has used it before.  Store sharp items such as pens and scissors pointing downward when not in use. Always carry scissors pointing downwards.  Be alert to "Household Use Only" precautions on appliances. Check the UL label to see if the appliance is approved for use in the workplace. 71

72 General Safety Principles  Avoid picking up broken glass with your bare hands. Wear gloves and use a broom and a dustpan.  Always use handrails on the stairs.  Do not lean too far back in your chair. Do not use desk chairs with fewer than 5 castors. They tip over much more easily than 5-point castor chairs. 72

73 General Safety Principles  Do not attempt to stop an elevator door with your hands. Take the next elevator and avoid a hand crush hazard.  Have broken equipment fixed or thrown away. If you leave the equipment laying around, someone may pick it up and try to use it. 73

74 1. Trip hazards can be caused by (check all that apply):  Wet floors  Electrical Cords  Items not properly stored  Steps not clearly marked 2. Extension should not be used for permanent appliances. T/F 3. Heavy file loads should be placed in he bottom levels and lighter loads in the top drawers. T/F Minimizing Workplace Hazards Pre-test 74

75 4. Check the items below that are most recommended for workplace safety. A. Use the proper equipment to reach high items. Step stools and ladders are small inexpensive ways to make the job easier and safer. B. Do not store heavy objects above the head. C. Never stand on revolving chairs or chairs with casters! D. Do not stack items so high that they block smoke detector and sprinklers. E. Store sharp items such as pens and scissors pointing downward when not in use. Always carry scissors pointing downwards. F. Do not attempt to stop an elevator door with your hands. Take the next elevator and avoid a hand crush hazard. Minimizing Workplace Hazards Pre-test 75

76 Ergonomics The goal of ergonomics is to find ways to arrange the workstation, work tools and work practices to minimize potential for musculoskeletal disorders. Ergonomics is concerned with eliminating or minimizing the following “Ergonomic Stressors” found in routine tasks:  Force – High force tasks involve heavy exertion for the muscles involved.  Repetition – Performing the same movements over and over with little change in motions or muscles used.  Extreme/Awkward/Static Postures – Prolonged or repeated time spent holding joints in an awkward or fixed position. 76

77 Safe Lifting  Do not carry more than 30 pounds by yourself.  Get help for objects with a width 18 inches or greater.  If possible, break the load down and make several trips with more manageable loads.  Go to afety/ergonomics/stu.shtml for an online ergonomics assessment tool. afety/ergonomics/stu.shtml  Lifting incorrectly can increase your risk of developing a back injury.  If it looks heavy and awkward, it probably is. Ask someone to help you or use a mechanical lift.  Think about the distance and height to the destination before lifting. 77

78 Ergonomics Pre-test Ergonomics is concerned eliminating or minimizing which of the following: Force – High force tasks involve heavy exertion for the muscles involved. Repetition – Performing the same movements over and over with little change in motions or muscles used. Extreme/Awkward/Static Postures – Prolonged or repeated time spent holding joints in an awkward or fixed position.

79 Ergonomics Pre-test Which of the following are recommended ergonomic procedures. (Check all that apply.)  Lifting incorrectly can increase your risk of developing a back injury.  Do not carry more than 30 pounds.  Get help with objects that are 18 inches wide or greater.  If possible, break the load down and make several trips.

80 Additional ergonomic reference web sites: UNC EHS Homepage UNC Ergonomics UCLA Ergonomics Typing Injuries Frequently Asked Questions: Answered Ergoweb Yale Ergonomics US Army Ergonomics Program OSHA's Ergonomics Section Office Ergonomics Training National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 80 For more ergonomic information

81 Regulating bodies of UNC Workplace Health and Safety  Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  NC DENR NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources  Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization (JCAHO)  NC Radiation Protection Section (NCRPS)  Office of State Personnel (OSP)  NC Fire Prevention Codes  NFPA 101 Life Safety Codes 81

82 Completion and Post-Test You have completed the New Employee Office Orientation. In order to receive credit for this training, you must complete the post test. If you have any questions regarding this training or any safety and health issue, please contact EHS at (919)


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