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 Brought to you by the  The Wyoming State Board of Education  The Wyoming Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: " Brought to you by the  The Wyoming State Board of Education  The Wyoming Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1  Brought to you by the  The Wyoming State Board of Education  The Wyoming Department of Education

2 Welcome  Safety Check  Cell phones…  Breaks…as needed and lunch  Personal Needs…  Participation…  Restrooms…  Questions…

3 Today’s Topics  Information detailing the significance of the dropout rate at this time ◦ Statistics describing the social, financial, and individual impacts of the state’s dropout rate  Descriptors of current Wy dropouts with disaggregated data  Developing school-community partnerships  Suggestions on using media to enhance your partnership  An understanding of how to access the Toolkit as a resource Takeaways…  The beginning of a strategic plan to design and create your initial steering committee  Some experience in using the on-line resources  Available agencies and state resources that can help

4 Did You Know?  7 minute video  Created by Karl Fisch, Scott McLeod, and Jeff Brenman  5 million + viewers  3 years old and most facts are out-dated, but the new ones are just as mind-blowing (note from one of the creators) Introductions  Name  Town/District  Occupation  Brief response to video

5 Alliance for Excellent Education 1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW · Suite 901 Washington, DC T F · Why be concerned about the dropout rate? $250 millionLost lifetime earnings for those 1000 dropouts in the class of 2009 $22.8 millionWhat Wyoming would save in health care costs over the lifetimes of each class of dropouts had they earned their diplomas $83 million +Wyoming households would have more than $83 million more in accumulated wealth if all heads of households had graduated from high school. $105 million +would be added to Wyoming’s economy by 2020 if students of color graduated at the same rate as white students.

6 Alliance for Excellent Education 1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW · Suite 901 Washington, DC T F · Why be concerned about the dropout rate? $9.5 millioncrime-related savings and additional revenue of each year if the male graduation rate increased by only 5%. $22.8 millionWhat Wyoming would save in health care costs over the lifetimes of each class of dropouts had they earned their diplomas 80%Percent of dropouts who depend on the government for health care assistance. $158 billionEstimated lost revenue to the federal government each year due to lower annual earnings of dropouts $ million Cost to the nation for each youth who drops out and enters a life of drugs and crime between dollars in crime control and health expenditures. “Does Education Reduce Participation in Criminal Activities?” and Muenning, mposium/resourceDetails.asp?PresId=4

7 America’s Promise Alliance Why be concerned about the dropout rate? Effects on your community Dropouts rarely move away They have little money and nowhere to go Unemployed dropouts have lots of idle time on their hands The increased presence of high school dropouts in your community increases the appearance of dropping out as an “acceptable” option to potential dropouts.

8 ymposium/resourceDetails.asp?PresId=7 Why be concerned about the dropout rate? Costs to the individual High school dropouts live a decade less than graduates as they are disproportionately affected by Heart disease, diabetes, and obesity Occupational hazards Less access to health insurance The average dropout makes 27% less income per year than the average high school graduate. Over a lifetime, this adds up to over a quarter-million dollars in reduced personal capital. Children of high school dropouts have a higher incidence of health problems and are more likely to drop out of high school themselves.

9 ymposium/resourceDetails.asp?PresId=7 Why be concerned about the dropout rate? What’s different now from even ten years ago? Decreased employment opportunities Increase of the requirement of diploma to open doors to career and education pathways Military Certification programs 80% of new jobs require some sort of post-secondary training

10 Unemployment changes in ten years August, 2000August, 2010 Over 25 years old, less than high school diploma 6.2%14% Over 25 years old, high school diploma, no college 3.7%10.3% years, education not determined14%26.3% Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey Original Data Value Series Id: LNS

11 Wyoming Graduation Rate08-09 Wyoming’s Goal85% Native American46% Asian88% White84% African-American76% Hispanic72% Female84% Male79% Free & Reduced68% Students with IEP59% All Students81%

12 Series Report 3, Wyoming Dept. of Ed. WY Dropout Numbers Numbers of dropouts by grade level Grades th13 8 th 31 9 th th th th273 Total1044

13 Series Report 3, Wyoming Dept. of Ed. Wyoming Dropout Numbers Breakout by ethnicity and gender 9-12 Native American70 Asian4 African-American16 Hispanic137 White765 Male599 Female401 Total1000

14 The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Marcy 2006 What more than 500 dropouts, from metropolitan, suburban, and rural schools districts responded when interviewed… 88%had passing grades, with 62% having C’s and above 70%were confident they could have graduated from high school 81%recognized that graduating from high school was vital to their success 74%would have stayed in school if they had it to do over again 51%took personal responsibility for dropping out 58%dropped out with just 2 years or less to complete 66%would have worked harder if expectations were higher 75%would have returned to a school with other students the same age 11%returned to school and received a high school diploma

15 The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Marcy 2006 Take a look at resources available on the toolkit Is all you have to remember

16 The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Marcy 2006 Identifying potential dropouts All students are potential dropouts All students, who at any time, encounter or are subject to any barrier that keeps them from being successful in any aspect of school which ultimately prevents them from receiving a diploma or encourages them to drop out of school, can be considered potential dropouts. What’s critical is that supports are in place before it happens.

17 The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Marcy 2006 Identifying potential dropouts Dropping out is almost NEVER a one-time event Youngsters begin “dimming” out in early grades Transition periods will have a great impact Lack of supports to counter negative experiences over-time wear away a student’s resolve to complete 80% have decided their future by 9 th grade

18 Identifying Potential Dropouts: Key Lessons for Building an Early Warning Data System A Dual Agenda of High Standards and High Graduation Rates A white paper prepared for Staying the Course: High Standards and Improved Graduation Rates, a joint project of Achieve and Jobs for the Future, funded by Carnegie Corp. of New York June 2006 Early Identification Checklist Social BackgroundSES, Minority, Male, Hi-Mobility, Over-age for grade, ELL Single parent family, mother who dropped out, low parental support for learning Teenagers with adult responsibilities Educational Experiences Students who fall behind academically: Low grades and test scores, Fs in English/math, behind in course credits, held back once or more Educational Engagement High absenteeism, poor classroom behavior, less participation in extra-curricular, poor relationships with school adults and peers Use with caution: Checklists can be very dangerous because of their simplistic nature, but they can provide a place to begin your research.

19 Identifying Potential Dropouts: Key Lessons for Building an Early Warning Data System A Dual Agenda of High Standards and High Graduation Rates A white paper prepared for Staying the Course: High Standards and Improved Graduation Rates, a joint project of Achieve and Jobs for the Future, funded by Carnegie Corp. of New York June 2006 Community characteristics that support all students’ success Health Services Accessibility, affordability, knowledge of Social ServicesWrap-around, effectiveness, available Work & CareerJob coaching, entry-level opportunities, school-to- career programs, internships, certification programs, adult ed programs Enrichment/R ecreation Decreases idle time, provides leadership opportunity, opportunities for career exploration Juvenile Justice Preventive vs Punitive, attempts to keep students in the community, works closely with other agencies and schools Neighborhood Community Improvement Opportunities for service learning, addressing pockets of poverty, empowers young people to believe they can make a difference

20 1, data gathered by Children’s Defense 25 E Street, NW Washington, DC (202)628‐8787 1(800)233‐1200 Finding the numbers in your own community that correspond to these Wyoming numbers may be helpful in your beginning work Number of children who are victims of abuse & neglect727 Number of children in foster care1,155 % of children living in poverty12.6% % of children living in extreme poverty3.3% Number of grandparents raising grandchildren4,573

21 National Dropout Prevention Center Clemsen University Dr. Jay Smink and Dr. William Schargel Fifteen Strategies for Dropout Prevention (research-based best practices) Community?School? Basic Core Strategies Mentoring/tutoring Service Learning Alternative Schooling After-school opportunities Early Inter- ventions Early childhood education Family engagement Early literacy development

22 National Dropout Prevention Center Clemsen University Dr. Jay Smink and Dr. William Schargel Fifteen Strategies for Dropout Prevention (research-based best practices) Community?School? Making the most of instruction Professional Development Active Learning Educational Technology Individualized Instruction Making the most of the wider community Systemic Renewal School-community Collaboration Career and Technical Education Safe Schools

23 Assemble an Organizing Committee Include a cross-section of the community Ex. Members of the health community ? ? ?

24 Assemble an Organizing Committee Include a cross-section of the community Ex. Members of the health community Mayor’s & County OfficeSchool Reps Business & Chamber repsLocal parent organizations Youth Serving organizationsFaith community Human servicesJuvenile justice Major employer reps2 and 4 year colleges

25 Assemble an Organizing Committee Don’t overlook members of state and county agencies and boards who may live in your community… P-16 CouncilWyoming State Board of Ed. Workforce ServicesWyoming Kids First After School AllianceParent Education Network

26 Assemble an Organizing Committee Keep the size to between 8-11You can add others later Select one entity to act as facilitator Example: Set time and dateInclude food Have current and reliable statistics ready Both school and community data Begin to write your charterMission, Goals, Objectives, Future members, Norms, Timeline

27 Let’s walk through a planning guide that is available through America’s Promise Alliance. Link to their site is on   An example is in your folder, “Louisiana’s Action Planning Worksheet”  (You can download a blank one from the website for your work when you assemble your organizing committee)

28  Ernie Over, Wyoming, Inc. ◦ How to use the media to enhance your school- community partnership efforts

29 Communities that work together start with a shared responsibility for doing something about it. Teachers and educational officials can deal with this more effectively if the schools and the community work in tandem.

30 “It’s our problem and it deserves to be a priority concern.” Communities that work together have a shared awareness of the seriousness of this issue, a conviction that it is their problem, and that it is a serious matter both for individuals who drop out and for the community as a whole. LEARNING TO FINISH: The School Dropout Crisis

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