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UNIT 1: NEED TO KNOW STANDARDS FOR US HISTORY Students must master these standards to perform well on unit exams, the GHSGT in Social Studies and the EOCT.

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Presentation on theme: "UNIT 1: NEED TO KNOW STANDARDS FOR US HISTORY Students must master these standards to perform well on unit exams, the GHSGT in Social Studies and the EOCT."— Presentation transcript:

1 UNIT 1: NEED TO KNOW STANDARDS FOR US HISTORY Students must master these standards to perform well on unit exams, the GHSGT in Social Studies and the EOCT.

2 SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North America developed. SSUSH2.5:. Explain the development of mercantilism and the trans- Atlantic trade.

3 What was the economic relationship between the colonies and Great Britain?

4 Many American colonists benefited from the trans-Atlantic trade relationship with Great Britain, even though the real purpose of the colonial trading system was to enrich Britain. The British interest in establishing colonies was influenced by the theory of mercantilism, which stated that a country’s ultimate goal was self- sufficiency and that all countries were in a competition to acquire the most gold and silver

5 How can you explain the balance of trade between Great Britain and the colonies as a successful mercantilist system?

6 Due to mercantilist ideas, nations concentrated on the balance of trade – the amount of goods sold compared to the amount bought. A favorable balance of trade would mean that more gold was coming in than going out. In order for Britain to maintain this favorable balance for itself, it used the American colonies as a market for British goods, and as a source of raw materials that were not native to Britain. Thus, Britain was able to keep gold flowing in the right direction.

7 SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North America developed. SSUSH2-6. Describe the Middle Passage, growth of the African population, and African- American culture.

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9 What was the Middle Passage?

10 The route that brought Africans to the West Indies (and later to North America) was known as the “Middle Passage.”

11 What were the conditions enslaved Africans endured during the Middle Passage?

12 It was an unusually cruel and inhumane journey. Africans were branded with hot irons before they left Africa for identification purposes. They were packed into the dark cargo holds of ships in horrible conditions with little food or water. They were often beaten and abused in unthinkable ways. Up to 20% of enslaved Africans died aboard each slave ship that crossed to the Americas.

13 What was involved in “triangular trade?”

14 The trade was described as “triangular trade” because it involved merchants who carried rum and other goods from New England to Africa. In Africa they traded their merchandise for enslaved people whom they transported to the West Indies and sold for sugar and molasses; these goods were then shipped to New England and made into rum.

15 What were the lives of enslaved Africans like after arriving in the Americas?

16 Once in America, their lives were extremely difficult. Around percent of slaves worked in agricultural labor on plantations and farms. The remainder worked as house slaves.

17 How did enslaved Africans survive and form a unique culture in the Americas?

18 Slaves led a grueling existence but were able to bond together in a sense of community for support and to fight against their plight in numerous ways. They developed a unique culture keeping alive many traditions from their various native lands, including weaving baskets, molding pottery, music, dance and stories. By the mid s the slave population was increasing in North America because of the growth of rice growing in the southern colonies

19 SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North America developed Identify Benjamin Franklin as a symbol of social mobility and individualism.

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21 Describe the major events in the life of Benjamin Franklin.

22 He was from a Boston family with 17 children. His father was a candle-maker and wanted Ben to be a minister. Ben wasn’t a good student and didn’t do well in school. After he dropped out, he became an apprentice in his brother’s printing shop. He eventually became a writer, a statesman, a philosopher, a printer and an inventor. He also became America’s first millionaire. He created the first fire department, was the first Postmaster General and signed all four documents that helped create the US.

23 How does Benjamin Franklin serve as an example of “Social mobility?”

24 The fact that he moved from being poor and under-educated to being wealthy, accepted by heads of state in Europe as an ambassador, consulted by men who would become the first presidents of the US, demonstrates how he moved freely among all social classes.

25 How does the life of Benjamin Franklin serve as an example of “individualism?”

26 The path that he carved for his life – leaving his family to do his own thing, inventing, service to his country and life- long learning certainly points to his individualism – he chose his own path, while still accomplishing so much.

27 SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North America developed Explain the significance of the Great Awakening.

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29 What was the “Great Awakening?”

30 The Great Awakening was an event that began in New England in the 1730s. It was a series of religious revivals lead by George Whitfield and Jonathan Edwards.

31 What role did the Great Awakening play in colonial America?

32 The Great Awakening led to the founding of many new religious movements and denominations. The Great Awakening was the first truly national event, in that these revivals were conducted all over the colonies and even where they did not occur, people knew about them.

33 What connection did the Great Awakening have to the American Revolution?

34 Some historians think this event paved the way for the American Revolution because it enabled the colonists to think of themselves as able to make independent decisions from the Church of England and the Puritans. It was certainly a step along the way for Americans developing their own ideas about themselves and their relationships to society.


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