Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Children’s SWB after Tsunami 2004: A Study in Tamil Nadu/India Dr. Silvia Exenberger- Vanham & Ao. Univ. Prof. Dr. Barbara Juen Marie Curie International.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Children’s SWB after Tsunami 2004: A Study in Tamil Nadu/India Dr. Silvia Exenberger- Vanham & Ao. Univ. Prof. Dr. Barbara Juen Marie Curie International."— Presentation transcript:

1 Children’s SWB after Tsunami 2004: A Study in Tamil Nadu/India Dr. Silvia Exenberger- Vanham & Ao. Univ. Prof. Dr. Barbara Juen Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission Four Years Post-Tsunami: Long-Term Effects of Trauma on Children aged 8-17 – A Culture-Sensitive Approach

2 Co-operation Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

3 Four years post-tsunami: Long-term effects of trauma in children aged – a culture-sensitive approach Shifting paradigms – symptoms, problems and resources of children and their mothers Assignment of culture-sensitive measurements – formulation of indicators of psychosocial well-being Mental health and psychosocial support over long periods of time – development of a training that focuses on strengthening resilience in children Main focus of the project: Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

4 Aim of the present study Development of indicators of children’s subjective well-being in the given sub- culture after 2004 tsunami from a child’s and caregiver’s perspective. Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

5 Research questions Which indicators determine subjective well-being amongst children in Tamil Nadu after 2004 tsunami? What contributes to the children’s well-being? What is the concept of the mothers of their children’s subjective well-being? What is the children’s concept of their subjective well- being? Which indicators are cultural specific? Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

6 Definition of subjective well-being Subjective well-being A Person is said to have subjective well-being if s/he experiences life satisfaction and frequent joy, and only infrequently experiences unpleasant emotions such as sadness or anger (Diener, Suh, & Oishi, 1997, p.25). Children associate well-being as positive feeling states such as happiness, excitement, peacefulness or calm – some integrate anger and sadness (Fattore, Mason, & Watson 2007) “well” described as “feeling good, being happy and able to live your life to the full” (NicGabhainn & Sixsmith, 2005) Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

7

8 Method [sample children & mothers] 112 tsunami-affected children aged 8-17 either living with their parent(s) or in family-based out-of-home care 56 adults, biological mothers (42) and caregivers of family- based out-of-home care (14) with parent(s) younger (8-11 years) with parent(s) older (12-17 years) Family-based younger (8-11 years) family-based older (12-17 years) f m Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission

9 Transcription of focus groups Focus groups Children give answers Mothers give answers happy unhappy coping A culture-sensitive approach: development of a list of indicators of children‘s SWB behaviour of children children’s (un)happiness coping 56 mothers (villages & SOS) 112 children (villages & SOS) Analysis on the basis of the qualitative research methodology “Grounded Theory” 5 domains, 12 categories, 50 sub-categories Categories: academic life, appreciation, civic life, family, SOS family, peers, social skills, coping, nature, tsunami, health, materialism

10 List of indicators of children’s well-being with 72 statements for mothers to answer about their children Focus groups Children give answers Mothers give answers happy unhappy coping A culture-sensitive approach: development of a list of indicators of children‘s SWB behaviour of children children’s (un)happiness coping 56 mothers (villages & SOS) 112 children (villages & SOS) List of indicators of children’s well-being with 17 statements List of indicators of children’s well-being with 64 statements

11 Results

12 Factor analysis [mothers’ data] Principal component analysis (PCA)  on 17 items with orthogonal rotation (varimax) KMO =.717  sampling adequate for the analysis Bartlett’s test of sphericity χ 2 (136) = 1111,36, p <.001 N = 333 Rotated Factor Loadings Trauma- related generalised fear Trauma- related specific fear Academic achievem. Other trauma- related symptoms Family compliance Coping 1 *friends Eigen- values 3,341,831,581,341,291,05 % of variance 19,6710,779,287,857,576,15 α

13 Mothers’ concept of children’s well-being Fear of *natural changes like full moon *peculiar sounds *rumours about tsunami *unexpected behaviour Fear of *playing at beach *taking bath in sea *going to sea Child *getting praised often *has good concentration *has faith in studies *clinging *sleeping disturbances *withdrawal Child *is supportive towards mother *is taking advice *shares sorrows with family members Having some close friends TRAUMA- related generalised fear TRAUMA- related specific fear Academic achievement TRAUMA: other trauma-related symptoms Family compliance COPING 1: friends

14 Factor analysis [children’s data] Principal component analysis (PCA)  on 64 items with orthogonal rotation (varimax) KMO =.706  sampling adequate for the analysis Bartlett’s test of sphericity χ 2 (2016) = 6580,58, p <.001 N = 290 Rotated Factor Loadings Other trauma- related symptoms Academic achievem. Trauma- related fears and intrusions Coping 1b *distract. *friends *nature community orientation Ill-being *getting beaten & scolded Family complia. Eigen- values 6,224,484,253,262,392,031,86 % of variance 9,726,996,645,093,743,182,90 α

15 Children’s concept of their own well-being TRAUMA: other trauma related symptoms Academic Achievement TRAUMA- related fears and intrusions COPING 1b: distractibility, friends, nature Community orientation ILL-BEING: getting beaten & scolded Family compliance *often quarrelling *being laughed at *getting teased a lot *having often fights *scoring good marks *good relationship to teacher *getting praised often *concrete plans for the future *still haunted by thoughts about tsunami *fear of: natural changes, term of tsunami & peculiar sounds *fear of going to sea, & taking bath in sea *having some close friends *distraction *nature – help to overcome sad moments *loves nature itself and being in nature *likes sportive activities *likes going on tour *is taking part at festivals *likes to show talents *getting beaten and scolded *getting upset by proximate and distal affairs *follows advices *goes to the temple *cares for environment

16 Factor analysis [mothers’ & children’s data] Principal component analysis (PCA)  on 72 items with orthogonal rotation (varimax) KMO =.713  sampling adequate for the analysis Bartlett’s test of sphericity χ 2 (2556) = 7892,42, p <.001 N = 288 Rotated Factor Loadings Coping 1a *nature *orientatio n on elder people Trauma- related generalis. & specific fear Other trauma- related symptom s Academic achievem Coping 1b *playfulln. *friends *feeling good at h. commun orientat. Family complia. Eigen- values 6,665,334,653,512,772,301,96 % of variance 9,257,406,464,873,853,202,72 α

17 Mothers’ & children’s concept of children’s well-being COPING 1a: nature & orient. on elder people TRAUMA- related general. & specific fear TRAUMA: other trauma-related symptoms Academic achievement COPING 1b: playfulness, friends, at home Community orientation Family compliance *loves nature itself & being in nature *speaks with elder people to overcome sadness *fear of: natural changes, term of tsunami & peculiar sounds *fear of going to sea *still haunted by thoughts about tsunami *often quarrelling *being laughed at *getting teased a lot *withdrawal *scoring good marks *good relationship to teacher *getting praised often *has faith in studies *concrete plans for the future *likes to play with friends *having some close friends *likes being at home *likes sportive activities *likes going on tour *likes to show talents *likes to take part in programmes *follows advices *goes to the temple *supportive towards mother

18 Discussion

19 Comparison of mothers’ & children’s concept of children’s well-being TRAUMA- related generalised fear TRAUMA- related specific fear Academic achievement TRAUMA: other trauma-related symptoms Family compliance COPING 1b: friends TRAUMA: other trauma related symptoms Academic Achievement TRAUMA- related fears and intrusions COPING 1a&b: distractibility, friends, nature Community orientation ILL-BEING: getting beaten & scolded Family compliance

20 mothers’ concept mothers & children children’s concept TRAUMA- related generalised fear TRAUMA- related specific fear Academic achievement TRAUMA: other trauma-related symptoms Family compliance COPING 1b: friends TRAUMA: other trauma related symptoms Academic Achievement TRAUMA- related fears and intrusions COPING 1a&b: distractibility, friends, nature Community orientation ILL-BEING: getting beaten & scolded Family compliance COPING 1a: nature & orient. on elder people TRAUMA- related general. & specific fear TRAUMA: other trauma-related symptoms Academic achievement COPING 1b: playfulness, friends, at home Community orientation Family compliance

21 Love for nature & orientation on elder people withdrawal, quarrelling, fighting friends, playfulness, happy at home


Download ppt "Children’s SWB after Tsunami 2004: A Study in Tamil Nadu/India Dr. Silvia Exenberger- Vanham & Ao. Univ. Prof. Dr. Barbara Juen Marie Curie International."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google