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Calais, Context & Community Missed Opportunities for Learning and a Proposed Redesign for Statues in Stanford’s Memorial Quad Dan Gilbert, EDUC 303X, Spring.

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Presentation on theme: "Calais, Context & Community Missed Opportunities for Learning and a Proposed Redesign for Statues in Stanford’s Memorial Quad Dan Gilbert, EDUC 303X, Spring."— Presentation transcript:

1 Calais, Context & Community Missed Opportunities for Learning and a Proposed Redesign for Statues in Stanford’s Memorial Quad Dan Gilbert, EDUC 303X, Spring 2006

2 In the center of Stanford University’s Memorial Quad are 6 statues by French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Known as “The Burghers of Calais” they depict average citizens that sacrificed themselves to save others in French the city of Calais after a siege from English troops. While there are several signs that provide description, it was challenging for a group of Stanford graduate students to connect learning with the statues themselves. Data gathered from observations and interviews suggest that opportunities for greater learning exist. This poster project proposes a slight redesign of the context where these statues are exhibited to facilitate connections for learning for visitors to Stanford’s campus. This redesign is tied to specific learning theory and assessment suggestions. Abstract

3 Observations & Interviews Students approached the statues in groups, active conversations, but once they arrived nearly all conversation stopped, just one student seemed to be asking questions of the others In a group debriefing, there was appreciation for the art, but after prompting, some confusion about the goals Nearly everyone that approached looked down to read the labels; Other groups of visitors beyond graduate students had similar interactions in the space One student said, “I hardly noticed anything because I was concentrating on taking good pictures” This experience was unique among graduate students but common among tourists visiting the same space. Capturing the experience for later is already happening, so it seems this is a good opportunity for reflection.

4 1.Signage in one language; many graduate students at Stanford speak English as a second language 2.No indication that this exhibit is part of collection or that more detailed information is available at the Cantor Arts Center 3.In this high traffic setting, missed opportunity to make big impact on how individuals consider art and role it has in higher education. Right now this is just a nice statue in a pretty place 4.No invitation to reflect on how viewing these statues connects with previous or future learning in art or in general 5.Nothing measured. Some possibilities include: behavior, learning outcomes, number of visitors, average length of stay, etc. Missed Opportunities

5 Redesign What is the role of sculpture at a university? Call and contribute your thoughts to the Stanford Arts Community ? Share & compare photos at rodin.stanford.edu LearningDesignAssessment - Develop materials that fit a variety of learners needs and previous experiences Leverage cell phones that users bring with them: create voice system with simple prompts to pick language and learning level Measure number and clustering of calls; a call means active choice to engage in learning: use observations for single specific assessment:* - Create opportunities to participate in communities of practice Invite visitors to share and compare photos at Cantor Center website; include related links Compare visitor motivation, engagement and reflection on website with visitor behaviors in museum. Are links followed? - Encourage reflection and metacognition Small sign to prompt reflection and contributions Do people show what they know? Do they indicate interest in future learning?

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7 Acknowledgements Thanks to: Co Barry for her photographs Education 303X students for interviews and cooperation References: Bransford, J., and Schwartz, D. (1999). Rethinking Transfer: A Simple Proposal with Multiple Implications. Review of Research in Education. Pp. 61 – 100. Michalchik, V.S. (1997). The display of cultural knowledge in cultural transmission: Models of participation from the pacific island of Kosrae. In G. D. Spindler (ed.) Education and Cultural Process: Anthropological Approaches. Waveland Press, Inc. Prospect Heights, IL. Pp. 393 – 426. National Research Council (2001). Knowing What Students Know, National Academy Press. Washington, D.C. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Chapters 1 & 4


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