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APAH Get the papers you need from the front of the room and get out some notebook paper. 1) Glenna16) Kathryn 31) Tyler 2) Arnav17) Eddie32) Gannan 3)

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Presentation on theme: "APAH Get the papers you need from the front of the room and get out some notebook paper. 1) Glenna16) Kathryn 31) Tyler 2) Arnav17) Eddie32) Gannan 3)"— Presentation transcript:

1 APAH Get the papers you need from the front of the room and get out some notebook paper. 1) Glenna16) Kathryn 31) Tyler 2) Arnav17) Eddie32) Gannan 3) Leticia18) Nicole 4) Ashlee19) Tyler 5) Rachel20) Krishone Table: 6) Justin21) ChelseaDarrian 7) Alice22) Christopher 8) Sarah23) Kayla 9) Whitney24) Joseph 10) Lauren25) Phaedra 11) Skylor26) Logan 12) Gaines27) Marylynne 13) Chasitie28) Cameron 14) Saul 29) Ricky 15) Taylor30) Eric

2 Agenda  Announcements/Discussion/Homework in Box  Opener:  Reading quiz  Class work:  Sketchbook Introduction  Power and Mesopotamian Art  Closure  The questions historians ask

3 Sketchbook Assignment

4 Sketchbook Assignment: Mind Mapping  Mind mapping is a non- linear, graphic way of organizing information.  It allows you to focus on the relationships between ideas. It may also be something you have never tried before  It is the pictorial brainstorm for your required essays

5 Sketchbook Assignment: Mind Mapping- How To  1) Identify the Central Concept  Requires you to analyze the connection between Ancient, Western, Non-Western, and Contemporary art through a theme (i.e., view of women, power and art, etc.)  2) Write down the main points  Identify ideas and issues that you think could be important to the central concept through summarizing.  3) Make Connections  Once you have identified how each piece illustrates the theme, analyze the similar/different elements in each piece and its interpretation of the theme  4) Be creative- add visual interest  Draw your reader in to your sketchbook through the use of pop-ups, color, layering, etc. Make your argument interactive It is ok to draw on the image (use both printed and sketched images)

6 Sketchbook Examples Distribute rubric

7 Sketchbook topics for this unit:  In art, war is often the subject of a work. Discuss how The Standard of Ur and Picasso’s Guernica depict war citing all symbolic representations and interpretations of war and society.  Cultures often create sculptures that illustrate the values and beliefs of their society. Discuss how the Seated Scribe, from Saqqara, Egypt, Fourth Dynasty and an image of the meditating Buddha depict the human body in art citing all symbolic body representations. The Ancient Near EastEgypt

8 8 The Ancient Near East

9  Mesopotamia:  Region that gave birth to three modern faiths- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam  First Neolithic Revolution: Hunter and gatherer to farmer and herder 9

10 Mesopotamian Culture and History  Sumerians BCE  Akkadians  Neo-Sumerian and Babylonians BCE  Assyrian  Took their name from Assur (city) named for Ashur (King of Assyrian gods). At height, their empire extended from the Tigris River to the Nile and from the Persian Gulf to Asia Minor  Empire was never secure- began to disintegrate with Ashurbanipal’s reign, Medes onslaught from the east, and resurgent Babylonians from the south  Neo-Babylonian and Persia  Neo-Babylonians conquered the Assyrian empire.  Most important king, Nebuchadnezzar’s restoration of Babylon can be seen in the construction of two of the Seven Wonders of the world  Persians were conquered by Alexander the Great in 330 BCE.

11 Power and Art  What is the relationship between power and art?

12 The first city states, city planning, and organized religion are attributed to Sumer. Explore how the art – and architecture – are effected. Sumerian Art

13 The first city states, city planning, and organized religion are attributed to Sumer. Explore how the art – and architecture – are effected. Sumerian Art Sumerians BCE * Transformed the Tigris and Euphrates valleys into the Fertile Crescent * City-states under the protection of individual deity * Innovations: specialization of labor, city- states, cuneiform, ziggurats * Area conquered by Sargon of Akkad

14 White Temple and ziggurat, Uruk (modern Warka), Iraq, ca. 3200–3000 BCE. 14

15 White Temple of Uruk  Ziggurat: In Mesopotamian architecture, a monumental platform for a temple  temple closer to the heavens; to connect heaven and earth “House of the Platform between Heaven and Earth”  Sacred architecture 15

16 Reconstruction drawing of the White Temple and ziggurat, Uruk (modern Warka), Iraq, ca. 3200– 3000 BCE. 16

17 White Temple and ziggurat Uruk (modern Warka) Iraq ca. 3,200-3,000 B.C.E. mud brick

18 White Temple and ziggurat Uruk (modern Warka) Iraq ca. 3,200-3,000 B.C.E. mud brick

19

20 Standard of Ur from Tomb 779, Royal Cemetery Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar) Iraq ca. 2,600 B.C.E. wood, shell, lapis lazuli, red limestone approximately 8 x 19 in.

21 The Standard of Ur  Original function is not understood  Current appearance is a reconstruction  Main panels- War and Peace  War- Sumerian army  Peace- good brought to a banquet 21

22 Standard of Ur (war side) from Tomb 779, Royal Cemetery Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar) Iraq ca. 2,600 B.C.E. wood, shell, lapis lazuli, red limestone approximately 8 x 19 in.

23 Standard of Ur (peace side) from Tomb 779, Royal Cemetery Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar) Iraq ca. 2,600 B.C.E. wood, shell, lapis lazuli, red limestone approximately 8 x 19 in.

24 Akkadian Art Explore how art is used to express political ideas of kingship and territory in the ancient Akkadian and Neo-Sumerian cultures.

25 Akkadian Art Explore how art is used to express political ideas of kingship and territory in the ancient Akkadian and Neo-Sumerian cultures. Akkadians * Called themselves kings of the world; leaders assumed divine attributes * Innovations: cast hollow-life size bronze sculptures, place figures at different levels in a landscape * The united Third Dynasty of Ur fell to the Elamites.

26 Victory stele of Naram-Sin from Susa, Iran ca. 2,254-2,218 B.C.E. sandstone 79 in. high

27 Victory Stele of Naram-Sin  depicts the king’s defeat of the Lullubi peoples of present-day Iran  damaged at the top and the bottom  made of pink limestone  Akkadian kings ruled with absolute authority  How is the king’s victory shown in this work?  rejected traditional division of carvings in layers…

28 Victory stele of Naram-Sin from Susa, Iran ca. 2,254-2,218 B.C.E. sandstone 79 in. high

29 Neo-Sumerian Art

30 Neo-Sumerian and Babylonians BCE * Ruling style returned to city-states * Largest ziggurat built at Ur, Gudea of Lagash built several temples with votive offerings of himself to the Gods, Hammurabi creates his law code * The Elamite capital, Susa, was sacked by the Assyrians in 641 BCE.

31 Ziggurat at Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar) Iraq ca. 2,100 B.C.E. mud brick

32 Ziggurat at Ur  Ziggurat  Built by Ur-Nammu to help rebuild the economy during the Third Dynasty of Ur  Part of temple complex that served as an administrative center for the city  also was a shrine to the moon god Nanna, the patron deity of Ur  Was restored in the Neo-Babylonian period  Only the foundation survives  lowest level is original construction; upper two levels are Babylonian restorations

33 Ziggurat (restored) at Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar) Iraq ca. 2,100 B.C.E. mud brick

34 34 Ziggurat (northeastern facade with restored stairs), Ur (modern Tell Muqayyar), Iraq, ca BCE.

35 Babylonian Art Explore the Code of Hammurabi, how it is expressed in art and why it contributes to cultural understanding in the ancient Near East.

36 Stele with code of Hammurabi from Susa, Iran ca. 1,780 B.C.E. basalt 88 in. high

37 Hammurabi’s Code  Stele (pl. stelae): a carved stone slab used to mark graves/to commemorate historical events  Hammurabi: Babylon’s greatest king( BCE)  Most complete legal document of Antiquity  Three parts:  Historical prologue: Hammurabi as the protector of the weak and oppressed  Lyrical epilogue: the work and its influence on the future laws written simply to be understood by all

38 Stele with code of Hammurabi from Susa, Iran ca. 1,780 B.C.E. basalt 88 in. high

39 Sasanian Art Explore how the Persian art and the later Sassanian art is different from other art of Mesopotamia.

40 Palace of Shapur I from Ctesiphon, Iraq ca. 250 C.E.

41 Palace of Shapur  ruined today  1880 earthquake  Central figure is monumental brick audience hall covered by barrel vault that comes almost to a point  Blind arcades across the façade  is an arcade that is composed of a series of arches that has no actual openings and that is applied to the surface of a wall as a decorative element: i.e. the arches are not windows or openings but are part of the masonry face

42 Palace of Shapur I from Ctesiphon, Iraq ca. 250 C.E.

43 43 Palace of Shapur I, Ctesiphon, Iraq, ca. 250 CE.

44 44 Triumph of Shapur I over Valerian, rock-cut relief, Bishapur, Iran, ca. 260 CE.

45 Summarizing Thought:  How is art used to show power in Ancient Mesopotamia?

46 Exit Slip- Power and Art  On your own, decipher a painting/sculpture, etc., assigned to you. Explain reasoning!  How old is the work? How do you know? Physical evidence? Documentary Evidence? Internal Evidence?  What is its style? Period Style? Regional style? Personal style?  What is the subject? Genre? Portraiture? Landscape? Still Life? Iconography?  Who made it? Attribute? School?  Who paid for it? Patron?

47 Credits  William V. Ganis, PhD  Gardner’s PowerPoint, chapter 2, 13 th edition


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