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MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 1 Aug 2006 MPK Pilot Training for Continued Operational Evaluation of Runway Status Lights (RWSL)

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Presentation on theme: "MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 1 Aug 2006 MPK Pilot Training for Continued Operational Evaluation of Runway Status Lights (RWSL)"— Presentation transcript:

1 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 1 Aug 2006 MPK Pilot Training for Continued Operational Evaluation of Runway Status Lights (RWSL) at SAN Jason Coon and Peter Hwoschinsky, FAA Maria Picardi Kuffner, MIT/LL San Diego (SAN) Runway Status Lights (RWSL) This work is sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration under Air Force Contract #FA C Opinions, interpretations, recommendations and conclusions are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

2 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 2 Aug 2006 MPK Outline Runway Incursion Problem Runway Status Lights (RWSL) Solution –RWSL Operational Concept –RWSL Operational Requirements –RWSL Operational Evaluation at SAN Summary

3 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 3 Aug 2006 MPK Definition of Runway Incursion “Any occurrence at an aerodrome involving the incorrect presence of an aircraft, vehicle or person on the protected area of a surface designated for the landing and take-off of aircraft.” –Source: FAA Runway Safety Office Pilot deviations are the largest cause of runway incursions

4 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 4 Aug 2006 MPK Overview of RWSL Runway Status Lights Purpose –Reduce frequency and severity of runway incursions –Prevent runway accidents How do lights do this? By increasing pilots’ and vehicle operators’ situational awareness –Direct indication via runway entrance lights (RELs) that a runway is unsafe to enter or cross

5 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 5 Aug 2006 MPK RWSL Operational Concept

6 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 6 Aug 2006 MPK REL Operational Requirements RELs must not interfere with normal safe operations RELs must operate automatically for each landing and departure RELs must accurately depict runway is unsafe to enter/cross –Red if runway not safe –Otherwise off (no illumination) Runway Guard Lights (yellow) Runway Entrance Lights (red)

7 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 7 Aug 2006 MPK RWSL System Architecture Airport Surface Surveillance Primary Radar Transponder Multilateration ASR-9 Terminal Area Surveillance Fusion State Machine Light Activation Logic ATC Displays Field Lighting System Prediction Engine LAX DFW

8 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 8 Aug 2006 MPK Operational Evaluation at SAN RELs installed on RWY 09/27 –North side: TXYs C1, C2, C6 –South side: TXYs B1, B6, B10

9 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 9 Aug 2006 MPK Configuration of Runway Entrance Lights (RELs ) RELs are red when it is unsafe to enter the runway Red RELs always aligned with taxiway centerlines and directed toward taxiway hold line –Including one REL placed on runway centerline –SAN taxiway centerlines are both straight and curved Runway Entrance Lights Concept RELS New RELs LAX Existing RGLs

10 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 10 Aug 2006 MPK REL Logic RELs turn ON when high-speed traffic exists or is predicted to be on the runway –Departures turn on all RELs downfield during takeoff roll at or above a site adaptable speed parameter –Arrivals turn on all RELs on the projected runway at a site adjustable distance parameter from the threshold (usually 3/4 nmi) All RELs turn OFF when: –Departures are declared airborne by RWSL logic (usually 100’) –Arrivals have landed and slowed to taxi speed (usually below 35 kts) RELs at specific intersections: –Individual RELs turn off just prior to the intersection being cleared to reduce interference with ATC use of anticipated separation –Individual RELs may be on at intersections just ahead of aircraft in landing roll-out

11 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 11 Aug 2006 MPK Protocol for Pilots Viewing Red RELs When RELs illuminate red, the runway is unsafe to enter or cross and the pilots should stop immediately When the lights are off, pilots/vehicle operators may not enter or cross the runway without ATC clearance – In some instances (anticipated separation), RELs may be illuminated while the clearance is being given, but should be turned off by the time the controller has finished issuing the clearance RELs indicate runway status only; they do not indicate clearance!

12 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 12 Aug 2006 MPK Proposed Phraseology Flight crew members and air traffic controllers should follow these procedures with installed RELs: –When cleared to either “cross the runway”, “position and hold”, or “immediate takeoff”, and RELs are illuminated; stop the aircraft and indicate to Air Traffic “Transair 123 stopped with red lights” and then wait for further clearance. –When RELs illuminate normally due to crossing, landing or departing traffic without any proximate hazard, the flight crew should remain clear of the runway or stopped short of the runway and wait for further clearance. –When controllers issue clearances that result in aircraft stopping due to red lights at runway/taxiway intersections, Air Traffic should reevaluate the traffic and issue further clearances accordingly. –When no clearance was given or the clearance was to “hold short of the runway” but the aircraft continued across the hold line and flight crews observed illuminated red lights, the flight crew should tell Air Traffic that “Transair 123 is stopped with red lights.”

13 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 13 Aug 2006 MPK Phase 1: Engineering Development (Completed Dec 05) –Recorded surveillance data –Laboratory (controlled) environment –Engineering assessment Phase 2: Shadow Operations (Completed May 06) –Live surveillance data –Simulated RWSL operation on display in tower –Controller evaluation Phase 3: Extended Operational Evaluation (06-09) –Live surveillance data –RWSL system operating in real time –User Group (controllers and pilots) evaluation Current: Continued Operational Evaluation with new airport surveillance (ASDE-X) RWSL Development Phases

14 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 14 Aug 2006 MPK Pilot information sources Media planned for training pilots –Website available on-line –FAA Notices to Airmen (NOTAM) –Jeppesen/LIDO Chart Inserts –Posters/training cards distributed to pilots by airlines and unions –Powerpoint presentations and animations ATIS (example) –“Runway status lights operational evaluation in progress”

15 MIT Lincoln Laboratory RWSL OpEval PilotTraining, page 15 Aug 2006 MPK Summary RWSL Goal –reduce frequency and severity of runway incursions RWSL Concept –improve safety via increased pilots’ situational awareness RWSL Method –provide automatic depiction that a runway is unsafe to enter via status lights on airport for pilots RWSL Requirements –controller acceptance: no impact on normal safe operations –pilot acceptance: operational suitability of lights


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