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Interdisciplinary Narrative Writing Unit By: Ty Sutz Grade 5 Narrative Writing Simulated Journal ELA Civil War.

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Presentation on theme: "Interdisciplinary Narrative Writing Unit By: Ty Sutz Grade 5 Narrative Writing Simulated Journal ELA Civil War."— Presentation transcript:

1 Interdisciplinary Narrative Writing Unit By: Ty Sutz Grade 5 Narrative Writing Simulated Journal ELA Civil War

2 Grade 5 GA Writing Assessment utilizes ELA5W1, ELA5W2, and ELA5C1 test of narrative, informational and persuasive writing Scoring : ideas, organization, style, and conventions

3 Grade 5 GA Writing Assessment Narrative Writing recounts a story grounded in personal experience or the writer’s imagination circumstances or events uses a setting, characters, circumstances or events uses, a plot, point of view, and a sense of resolution employs flashback, foreshadowing, dialogue, tension, or suspense

4 Grade 5 GA Writing Assessment Narrative Writing Student Checklist Prepare Yourself to Write. Make Your Paper Meaningful. Make Your Paper Interesting to Read. Make Your Paper Easy to Read.

5 Pre-Assessment You are a visitor to the Amazon Rainforest. Write a postcard to your friends in class explaining what you have learned about the people and creatures of the rainforest. 1.Choose a topic all students can write about. 2.Pass out several sheets of paper and two sharpened pencils per student. 3.Give students 30 minutes to write. Prompt given orally and in writing: -helps teacher determine student’s present level of performance

6 Narrative Writing

7 Narrative Writing… A story like in a book, movie, or play… Contains: Setting Characters Problem or goal Key events Ending

8 Instructional grouping during introduction and practice Students’ Benefit Teacher interaction Attention focused Modeling Learn from each other Teacher’s Benefit Efficient use of time More time on task Scaffolding Equitable delivery of information

9 Stage 1

10 Prewriting First stage 70 % of writing process Utilizes graphic organizer Choose topic, gather & organize thoughts

11 Pre-writing Graphic Organizer TopicCharacters STORY MAP 1 Beginning Setting A day in the Civil War

12 Middle First … Next… Then…

13 Ending Story Map #.6 Dr. Tonja Root’s ECED 4300 Website. Retrieved May 19, 2009 from

14 3: Met the PLO2: Partially Met the PLO 1: Did Not Meet the PLO0: Not Met Topic selection Well-defined topic Related appropriately to genre Somewhat too narrow or broad May need to make minor change to conform to genre Too narrow or too broad Not related to genre No attempt Story mapConforms to the function 3+ events Conclusion Somewhat conforms to the function 2 events May complete: Conclusion Attempts made to conform to function 2 events Conclusion No attempt Character s Lists 2+ characters Describes 2+ characters ’ physical and personality traits Lists 1+ characters Describes 1-2 characters ’ physical or personality traits Lists 1+ characters No description included No characters listed SettingDescribes 3 elements of setting Describes 2 elements of setting Describes 1 element of setting Setting not developed ProblemWell-developed problem stated Clear problem statedProblem stated may not be related No problem Events3+ events listed with details for each event 3+ events listed with details for 2 events 2 events listed Details not included 0-1 event listed Event 1Relates to topic with three details Relates to topic with two details Relates to topic with one details Not related to topic Event 2Relates to topic with three details Relates to topic with two details Relates to topic with one details Not related to topic Event 3Relates to topic with three details Relates to topic with two details Relates to topic with one details Not related to topic Conclusio n Well-developed conclusion Developed but left reader hanging Conclusion attemptedNo conclusion Total points 3 x _______ = ______ points 2 x _______ = ______ points 1 x _______ = ______ points Scoring Guide for Narrative Prewriting Stage Developed by Root, T. (2006). Scoring guide for narrative prewriting stage. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved on May 18, 2009, from

15 Accommodations Developmental differences  Seating  Rephrasing  Repetition in verbal cues  Prompting  Extra assistance/practice Cultural Differences  Proximity  Body language  Verbal & written language  Rephrasing  Seating  Translation dictionary

16 Drafting Stage 2

17 F O C U S Drafting form IDEAS from graphic organizer F O C U S on content Catch readers attention w/ intro 3 + body paragraphs w/ details sums Conclusion sums up ideas

18 Area:ExceedsMeetsPartially MeetsDoes Not Meet Introduction  3 or more characters with descriptive details were present in the introduction  4 or more parts of the setting with details was present in the introduction  A problem with multiple supporting details was present in the introduction  2 characters with descriptive details were present in the introduction  3 parts of the setting with details were present in the introduction  The problem with supporting details was listed in the introduction  1 character with descriptive details was present in the introduction  2 part of the setting with details was present in the introduction  The problem was listed with no supporting details in the introduction  0 characters were present in the introduction  1 part or less of the setting was present in the introduction  There was no problem listed in the introduction Body  Body had 4 or more events with supporting details  Body had 3 events with supporting details  Body had 2 event with supporting details  Body had 1 or no events with supporting details Events  Listed 4 or more events  Listed 4 or more supporting details for each event  Listed 3 events  Listed 3 supporting details for most events  Listed 2 events  Listed 1 to 2 supporting details for most events  Listed 1 to 0 events  Listed 0 supporting details for most events Conclusion  Provided an end to the story Provided an end to the story  Provided partial end to the story  Did not provide an end to the story 4 th Grade Rubric for Drafting Sutz, T. (2009). Rubric for Drafting, unpublished rubric, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia.

19 Stage 3 Revising

20 Revising Meet reader’s needs Re-evaluate content Reread Adding, deleting, changing, re-arranging Strategies: – Selective expansion – Author’s chair – Writing groups

21 SymbolMeaningExample Insert a word or punctuation little My brother fell, but he was hurt. not Delete …apples, cherries, carrots, and grapes. Re-arrange We bought some shoes. We went to the store. Sutz, T. (2009) Revisions Marks. Unpublished piece. Valdosta State University. Valdosta, GA Revisions Marks Exceeded Standards Meets StandardPartially Meet Standard Standard Not Met SentencesUsed complete sentences and complex sentence Used complete sentences. Used some sentences Mostly had phrases. Little to no sentences used. ParagraphsThere is 1 beginning, 3 middle and 1 conclusion paragraph There is 1 beginning, 2 middle and 1 conclusion paragraph There is no clear beginning, middle, or conclusion paragraphs Revision MarksUsed revision marks correctly to revise paper Used some revision marks correctly Attempted to use revision marks correctly No attempt to use revision marks ContentMade correct changes to content to make reading flow, clear Changed content to improve clarity Changed content still lacks clarity Did not make any changes Revisions Rubric Sutz, T. (2009) Revision’s Rubric. Unpublished piece. Valdosta State University. Valdosta, GA

22 Stage 4 Editing

23 Editing Set aside for a couple days Proofreading. Again and again. Focus on mechanics: – Spelling, capitalization, and punctuation. Use proofreader’s marks Peer editing/ teacher conferences

24 Category4-Exceeds PLO3-Meets PLO 2-Partially Meets PLO 1-Does Not Meet PLO 0-Does Not Meet PLO Spelling 0 errors in spelling 1-2 errors in spelling 3-4 errors in spelling 5 or more errors in spelling No attempt to correct spelling Punctuation Commas, apostrophes, ending punctuation 0-2 errors in punctuation 3-4 errors in punctuation 5-7 errors in punctuation 8 or more errors in punctuation No attempt to punctuate Capitalization Beginning of sentences, names, and proper nouns 0 errors in capitalization 1-2 errors in capitalization 3-4 errors in capitalization 5 or more errors in capitalization No attempt to capitalize Proofreader’s Marks 0 errors in use of proofreader’s marks. 1-4 errors in use of proofreader’s marks. 5 or more errors in proofreader’s marks. Did not properly use any proofreader’s marks. No attempt to use proofreader’s marks Editing Rubric Sutz, T. (2009) Editing Rubric. Adapted from Dr. Root’s Web site

25 Proofreader’s Marks

26 Stage 5 publishing

27 Publishing Sharing complete piece w/ others Illustrations, displays, presentation Finest handwriting, or typed

28 Exceeds StandardMeets StandardPartially Meets Standard Does Not Meet Standard Ideas and Content-Includes a clearly presented central idea with relevant facts, supporting details, or explanations - Establishes a well developed idea/plot, and setting -Includes a central idea with mostly relevant facts, supporting details, or explanations - Establishes an idea/plot and setting -Includes a central idea with limited facts, supporting details, and/or explanations Establishes a weak idea/plot and setting -Includes a central idea but lacks related facts, supporting details, and/or explanations Establishes no real idea/plot or setting Organization-Organizing structure that includes paragraphs - Engages reader creatively, relates significant events, and moves to a clear conclusion - Organizing structure that includes paragraphs - Engages the reader, relates significant events, and moves to a conclusion -Organizing structure with very few paragraphs - Minimally developed sequence of events and fails to fully engage the reader or conclude story -Organization lacks paragraphing structure - Sequence of events is not present or confusing and fails to engage the reader or conclude story Martin, L.L. (2007). Publishing Scoring Guide. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. (READ 7140). GA. Narrative Publishing Scoring Guide

29 Voice-Appropriate to topic, purpose, and audience - Engaging -Shows an awareness of Audience - Writing is somewhat engaging - inconsistent or Weak - Shows limited awareness of audience Little or no voice is evident - Awareness of audience or personal involvement is not evident Sentence FluencySentences flow - Sentence length, structure, and complexity is varied Sentences flow - Sentence structures are varied Sentences are fragmented, run-on or confusing - Sentence structures are limited in variety Sentences are incomplete and/or unclear Word ChoiceUses dramatic descriptive language - Enables the reader to visualize the events or experiences Uses descriptive language - Enables the reader to visualize the events or experiences Uses limited, repetitive word choice - Gives a visual picture Uses limited, repetitive word choice - Does not give a visual picture MechanicsContains few, if any, errors in mechanics that makes the writing easy to read and understand Contains some mechanical errors that do not interfere with the meaning Contains frequent mechanical errors that are noticeable and confuse the reader Contains many mechanical errors and the writing is difficult to follow Martin, L.L. (2007). Publishing Scoring Guide. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. (READ 7140). GA.


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