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1 Fields and Signals in Coupled Coaxial and Cylindrical Cavities John C. Young Chalmers M. Butler Clemson University.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Fields and Signals in Coupled Coaxial and Cylindrical Cavities John C. Young Chalmers M. Butler Clemson University."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Fields and Signals in Coupled Coaxial and Cylindrical Cavities John C. Young Chalmers M. Butler Clemson University

2 2 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Introduction Sample Structures Integral Equation Motivation Data and Observations

3 3 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Structures

4 4 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Structures

5 5 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Structure and Sections

6 6 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation Definitions

7 7 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation Definitions

8 8 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation Definitions

9 9 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation

10 10 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation

11 11 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation Definitions

12 12 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Integral Equation

13 13 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Solution Technique Pulse Expansion/Point Matching – matrix equation Kummer’s transformation – acceleration of convergence Fields at points in cavity can be found from knowledge of aperture fields

14 14 Experimental Setup

15 15

16 16 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Input Admittance

17 17 Reflection Coefficient Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group

18 18 Input Admittance Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group

19 19 Reflection Coefficient Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group

20 20 Input Admittance Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group

21 21 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Frequency Domain Data Radial Cutoff Frequencies Section 1 Section GHz 1.58 GHz 14.9 GHz 3.27 GHz Axial Resonant Frequencies TEM Mode Section GHz 3.00 GHz TM 01 Mode Section GHz 3.39 GHz

22 22 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Frequency Domain Data Radial Cutoff Frequencies Section 1 Section GHz 1.58 GHz 14.9 GHz 3.27 GHz

23 23 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Frequency Domain Data Axial Resonant Frequencies TEM Mode Section 2 Section GHz 1.50 GHz TM 01 Mode Section 2 Section GHz 7.54 GHz Radial Cutoff Frequencies Section 1 Section 2 Section GHz 1.58 GHz 7.39 GHz 14.9 GHz 3.27 GHz 14.9 GHz

24 24 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Frequency Domain Data Axial Resonant Frequencies TEM Mode Section GHz 3.00 GHz TM 01 Mode Section GHz 3.39 GHz Radial Cutoff Frequencies Section 1 Section 2 Section GHz 1.58 GHz 7.39 GHz 14.9 GHz 3.27 GHz 14.9 GHz

25 25 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Sample Frequency Domain Data Radial Cutoff Frequencies Section 1 Section 2 Section GHz 1.58 GHz 7.39 GHz 14.9 GHz 3.27 GHz 14.9 GHz Axial Resonant Frequencies TEM Mode Section 2 Section GHz 1.87 GHz 2.50 GHz 3.75 GHz TM 01 Mode Section 2 Section GHz 7.62 GHz

26 26 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Preliminary Time Domain Data

27 27 Preliminary Time Domain Data Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group

28 28 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Disadvantages of frequency domain analysis Advantages of time domain analysis Provides direct physical interpretation Gives intuitive idea of meaning of frequency domain data Difficult to interpret data Very complicated for complex structures

29 29 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Easy to use with existing frequency domain analysis For signals with frequency content below the cutoff frequencies of all the cavities, transmission line analysis provides a very good approximation Requires knowledge of dc fields in the guide

30 30 Clemson University / Applied Electromagnetics Group Conclusions Fields in cascaded cavities can be determined Frequency domain data is often difficult to interpret, even for relatively simple structures Time domain analysis is easier to interpret physically and helps in understanding frequency domain data


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