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Marketing 334 Consumer Behavior Chapter 16 Alternative Evaluation and Selection From: Consumer Behavior, 10 th ed. By Hawkins, Mothersbaugh and Best.

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Presentation on theme: "Marketing 334 Consumer Behavior Chapter 16 Alternative Evaluation and Selection From: Consumer Behavior, 10 th ed. By Hawkins, Mothersbaugh and Best."— Presentation transcript:

1 Marketing 334 Consumer Behavior Chapter 16 Alternative Evaluation and Selection From: Consumer Behavior, 10 th ed. By Hawkins, Mothersbaugh and Best

2 Alternative Evaluation and Selection

3 How Consumers Make Choices bounded rationality In reality, all consumers have bounded rationality  A limited capacity for processing information. metagoal  A metagoal refers to the general nature of the outcome being sought.

4 How Consumers Make Choices Metagoals in Decision Making Maximize the accuracy of the decision Maximize the accuracy of the decision Minimize the cognitive effort required for the decision Minimize the cognitive effort required for the decision Minimize the experience of negative emotion Minimize the experience of negative emotion Maximize the ease of justifying the decision Maximize the ease of justifying the decision

5 16-5 How Consumers Make Choices 1.Affective Choice 2.Attitude-Based Choice 3.Attribute-Based Choice Three types of consumer choice processes:

6 How Consumers Make Choices Affective choices tend to be more holistic. Brand not decomposed into distinct components for separate evaluation. Evaluations generally focus on how they will make the user feel as they are used. Affective Choice Choices are often based primarily on the immediate emotional response to the product or service.

7 How Consumers Make Choices Attribute- versus Attitude-Based Choice Processes Attribute-Based Choice Requires the knowledge of specific attributes at the time the choice is made, and it involves attribute-by-attribute comparisons across brands. Attitude-Based Choice Involves the use of general attitudes, summary impressions, intuitions, or heuristics; no attribute-by-attribute comparisons are made at the time of choice.

8 Avis Courtesy Avis, Inc.

9 Gucci Watch

10 16-10 Evaluative Criteria Evaluative criteria are typically product features or attributes associated with either benefits desired by customers or the costs they must incur. Evaluative criteria can differ in  type  number  importance Nature of Evaluative Criteria

11 16-11 Evaluative Criteria Measurement of Evaluative Criteria Involves a determination of:  The Evaluative Criteria Used  Judgments of Brand Performance on Specific Criteria  The Relative Importance of Evaluative Criteria

12 Evaluative Criteria 1.Direct 1.Direct methods include asking consumers what criteria they use in a particular purchase. 2.Indirect 2.Indirect techniques assume consumers will not or cannot state their evaluative criteria. Projective techniquesProjective techniques Perceptual mappingPerceptual mapping Determination of Which Evaluative Criteria Are Used

13 Evaluative Criteria Perceptual Mapping of Beer Brand Perception

14 Evaluative Criteria Measuring consumer judgments of brand performance on specific attributes can include:  Rank ordering scales  Semantic Differential Scales  Likert Scales Determination of Consumers’ Judgments of Brand Performance on Specific Evaluative Criteria Performance on Specific Evaluative Criteria

15 Evaluative Criteria The importance assigned to evaluative criteria can be directindirect measured either by direct or by indirect methods.  The constant sum scale is the most common direct method.  Conjoint Analysis is the most common indirect method. Determination of the Relative Importance of Evaluative Criteria

16 16-16 Individual Judgment and Evaluative Criteria  Accuracy of Individual Judgments  Use of Surrogate Indicators  The Relative Importance and Influence of Evaluative Criteria  Evaluative Criteria, Individual Judgments, and Marketing Strategy

17 16-17 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices  Conjunctive Rule  Disjunctive Rule  Elimination-by-Aspects Rule  Lexicographic Rule  Compensatory Rule Non-compensatory

18 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices WinBook, Dell, IBM, and Toshiba are eliminated because they fail to meet all the minimum standards. Conjunctive Rule Minimum343123

19 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Disjunctive Rule Disjunctive Rule: Establishes a minimum required performance for each important attribute (often a high level). All brands that meet or exceed the performance level for any key attribute are acceptable. If minimum performance was: Price5 Weight5 Processor Not critical Battery life Not critical After-sale support Not critical Display quality 5

20 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices WinBook, Compaq, and Dell meet minimum for at least one important criterion and thus are acceptable. Disjunctive Rule Minimum55---5

21 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Elimination-by-Aspects Rule First, evaluative criteria ranked in terms of importance Second, cutoff point for each criterion is established. Finally (in order of attribute importance) brands are eliminated if they fail to meet or exceed the cutoff. RankCutoff Price13 Weight24 Display quality 34 Processor43 After-sale support 53 Battery life 63

22 16-22 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Step 1: Price eliminates IBM and Toshiba Step 2: Weight eliminates WinBook Step 3: Of remaining brands (HP, Compaq, Dell), only Dell meets or exceeds display quality minimum. Elimination-by-Aspects Rule Minimum343334

23 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Consumer ranks the criteria in order of importance. Then selects brand that performs best on the most important attribute. If two or more brands tie, they are evaluated on the second most important attribute. This continues through the attributes until one brand outperforms the others. WinBook would be chosen because it performs best on Price, our consumer’s most important attribute. Lexicographic Decision Rule

24 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices compensatory decision rule The compensatory decision rule states that the brand that rates highest on the sum of the consumer’s judgments of the relevant evaluative criteria will be chosen. Compensatory Decision Rule

25 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Compensatory Decision Rule Importance Score Importance Score Price30 Weight25 Processor10 Battery life 05 After-sale support 10 Display quality 20 Total100 Assume the following importance weights: Using this rule, Dell has the highest preference and would be chosen. The calculation for Dell is:

26 Decision Rules for Attribute-Based Choices Summary of Resulting Choices from Different Decision Rules


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