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GE WIND 1.5 MW. Wind Turbines Continue to Grow Larger…Taller…More Productive.

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Presentation on theme: "GE WIND 1.5 MW. Wind Turbines Continue to Grow Larger…Taller…More Productive."— Presentation transcript:

1 GE WIND 1.5 MW

2 Wind Turbines Continue to Grow Larger…Taller…More Productive

3 World Wide Growth

4 Plan Now for Coming yet Larger WTGs

5 A Typical Large Turbine has Multiple Subsystems and Controls

6 Cost of Energy Trend 1979: 40 cents/kWh Increased Turbine Size R&D Advances Manufacturing Improvements NSP 107 MW Lake Benton wind farm 4 cents/kWh (unsubsidized) 2004: 3 - 5 cents/kWh 2000: 4 - 6 cents/kWh

7 Current Situation –Wind viable at higher wind speed sites (Class 6 – avg. 15 mph @ 10m) –Limited high wind sites –Subsidies important New Focus Needed –Shift to future industry needs –Broaden range of competitive opportunities –Eliminate the need for subsidies Motivation for Low Wind Speed Technology R&D 2020 Wind Cost of Energy 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 1990 COE (¢/kWh [constant 2000 $]) Low wind speed sites 1995 2000 200520102015 Bulk Power Competitive Price Band High wind speed sites

8 Acquiring Wind Least-Cost: Size Matters Assuming the same wind speed of 8.08 M/S, a large wind farm is more economical Source: AWEA

9 The NIMBY Equation: “What’s in it for me” Perceived Project Benefits Perceived Project Detriment ≥ 1 Perceived Detriments: Visual Impacts Noise Health and Public Safety Environmental Neighborhood Character Perceived Benefits: Reduced Electric Bills Jobs Community Pride (Sustainability) Environmental Educational Curriculum Benefit

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13 Getting a Building permit: “You want to put up a what?” Obtaining a Building Permit depends on local, county, state and federal regulations. Some, all, or none of the following may apply: –Town or county zoning regulations –State coastal regulations Within the coastal zone –State Dept. of Environmental Management regulations Wetlands, or landfills Wildlife Areas –Local Historic District regulations –State historic or cultural resource commissions Designated historic area Areas with archeological significance Designated viewshed area –Federal Land or National Historic Register designation –State building and electrical codes

14 California Distributed Generation (DG) Wind Pros –Most Economical Renewable Technology –Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) Incentive of $1,500 per kW (I MW maximum) Total Project Size Increased to 5 MW –Net Metering Law (1 MW) –High Electric Rates –“Progressive” State –Desert Heating Effect – Turbine Power Coincides with Peak Cons –Limited Number of Large Loads in Windy Locations –Only 2 Utility-Scale DG Wind Turbines installed to date. –Incentive Funds Administered by Utilities. Conflict of Interest. –Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) or “Green Tags” not yet actively traded. REC’s “monetize” Environmental Benefits.

15 Simplifying Wind Resource Assessments Simplifying Wind Resource Assessments

16 Wind Resource Assessment Tools Becoming More Sophisticated

17 Energy Usage vs Turbine Production 2005 Plant Energy Usage (3,044,784 kWh/Yr) Average of 347 kW / 465 HP Predicted Turbine Production (2,000,000 kWh/Yr) Average of 217 kW / 290 HP 66% of Electricity provided by turbine The environmental equivalent of: Taking 90 cars off the road Or Planting 1,900 trees

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19 Desert Heating Effect “Accounting” (15 minute monthly basis) treatment in utility tariff does not reflect the underling reality (economics/statistics). Benefits of Peak System Summer Load Reduction from Wind Turbine will go to Ratepayers & Utility NOT Elementis Specialties.

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22 Solar Power Park Geo- thermal Roof Top & Industrial PV Solar Power Park Wind Power Park Solar Power Park Solar Power Park Wind Power Park Wind Power Park San Diego County Could Provide Sites For Solar & Wind Power Parks, Where Environmental Assessment, Permits, Power Lines & Water are Pre-arranged For All Solar Power Plant Developers Solar Power Park

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25 The Iowa Stored Energy Plant (ISEP) 3 Proven Technologies 1. Renewable wind energy 2. Aquifer storage of gas 3. Combustion turbine

26 CAES drive train (Dresser Rand)  Motor/ Generator and Combustion Turbine --------- Motor/Generator and Compressor Train 

27 The Alabama CAES plant Alabama Electric Cooperative McIntosh Power Plant Aerial View

28 Electric Power Substation at CAES Power Plant CAES Power Plant Operation During Energy Storage or Compression Phase Wind Generation Used to Compress Air No Extra Grid Power Used TAW 7/18/2002 Power Flow Air Flow Local Wind Farm Underground Aquifer Compressed Air Storage 50 MW 0 MW

29 San Diego Wind Resource

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31 Wind Harvest Vertical Axis Wind Turbines George Wagner (415) 663-8565 Wind Harvest’s turbines located in Palm Springs.

32 Maintaining Turbine Performance Artificial Rain

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34 Sky WindPower Dave Shepard - 619 265- 3434

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36 Recycled Energy

37 In 2004 this plant generated more clean power than we estimate was produced by all of the solar collectors throughout the world

38 Recycled Energy What is Recycled Energy? –Distributed Generation –Recovering heat or pressure energy from a process Proven Technology. 9,900 megawatts in operation in US. Equivalent of 10 large nuclear plants. This is 10% of the potential predicted by the EPA Recycling waste energy could have produced about 20% of the US electricity in 2003. This would have displaced about 25% of the fuel that was used to generate electricity WHY ARE WE NOT DOING THIS?

39 Conventional central generation plants dump 2/3 of their energy into lakes, rivers and cooling towers while factories and commercial facilities burn more fuel to produce the heat just thrown away.

40 How did we get here? Unquestioned belief that central generation is optimal Protected from competition and rewarded by obsolete rules the power industry continues to ignore opportunities to recycle energy. “The power industry consistently made sub-optimal choices over the past three decades.” WHAT CAN BE DONE?

41 “The best electric-only technology now converts more than 50 percent of the fuel to power, but the industry’s average efficiency has not improved in forty-three years. No other industry wastes two-thirds of its raw material; no other industry has stagnant efficiency; no other industry gets less productivity per unit output in 2004 than it did in 1904.” Source: Tom Casten – Critical Thinking About Energy

42 Regulated Monopoly Utilities Source: Tom Casten – Critical Thinking About Energy

43 Regulated Monopoly Utilities Source: Tom Casten – Critical Thinking About Energy Monopoly Efficiency Gap

44 5,242 generation plants were evaluated to compare plants built under monopoly protection vs Independent Power Producers to determine if optimal decisions had been made.

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48 Central Generation vs Distributed Generation Regulated Monopoly vs Private Sector

49 Recommended Actions 1.Comprehensive Reform – ERRATA (Energy Regulatory Reform and Tax Act) 2.National Fossil Fuel Efficiency Standard –Give an allowance for incremental fossil fuel. Start with national average from last year –Force all generators to purchase adequate allowances of shut them down. –Reduce the fossil fuel allowances each year.

50 Conclusion of Tom Casten and Brennan Downes Study The Distributed Generation Case saves $5 Trillion of capital investment Reduces power cost by 40% Cuts greenhouse gas emissions in half.

51 Do we need Mandatory Requirements from the Government? Should government pass standards to make buildings earthquake-proof or should we just assume that the market will build them for the next earthquake

52 Obstacles to Change Entrenchment of the “Utility Regulatory Complex” Lack of understanding of the issues. This can seem overly complex but it is Economics 101 Fringe Elements of the “Environmental Movement” with the Following Traits –Purists with Extreme/Inflexible Views –Anti-globalists, Anti-capitalists. You get what you reward!

53 “The best electric-only technology now converts more than 50 percent of the fuel to power, but the industry’s average efficiency has not improved in forty-three years. No other industry wastes two-thirds of its raw material; no other industry has stagnant efficiency; no other industry gets less productivity per unit output in 2004 than it did in 1904.” Source: Tom Casten – Critical Thinking About Energy

54 Regulated Monopoly Utilities Source: Tom Casten – Critical Thinking About Energy Monopoly Efficiency Gap


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