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Order - Torpediniformes Family - Narkidae The Sleeper Rays www.mainenterprises.co.nz/

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Presentation on theme: "Order - Torpediniformes Family - Narkidae The Sleeper Rays www.mainenterprises.co.nz/"— Presentation transcript:

1 Order - Torpediniformes Family - Narkidae The Sleeper Rays

2 Narkidae Torpediniformes Narkidae or subfamily Narkinae Crassinarke Crassinarke dormitor Heteronarce Heteronarce garmani Heteronarce mollis Narke Narke capensis Narke dipterygia Narke japonica Temera Temera hardwickii Typhlonarke Typhlonarke aysoni *Electrolux Electrolux addisoni n ~ 12 species Family Narcinidae - Subfamilies Narkidae & Narcininae? 4-5 Genera Appoximately 12 species (Compagno 2005)

3 Defining Characteristics Electric rays with broadly rounded snouts Cranial rostrum reduced to a narrow medial rod Circular/disk shaped body Short jaws not highly protrusible Strong labial cartilage Transverse mouth w/ shallow peripheral groove Monocuspidate teeth Precaudal tail moderately long and stout Large caudal fin population doubling time yrs Electric rays with broadly rounded snouts Cranial rostrum reduced to a narrow medial rod Circular/disk shaped body Short jaws not highly protrusible Strong labial cartilage Transverse mouth w/ shallow peripheral groove Monocuspidate teeth Precaudal tail moderately long and stout Large caudal fin population doubling time yrs Heteronarce & Elecrolux- 2 dorsal fins Crasinarke, Narke, Typhlonarke - 1 dorsal fin Temera - no dorsal fins

4 Typhlonarke aysoni - blind electric ray, blind legged torpedo Biology: Found on the continental shelf and slope Bathydemersal, marine, depth range 65 – 900 m Endemic to New Zealand Morphology: cm TL One dorsal fin No anal spines Dark brown dorsally, light brown ventrally Almost useless eyes Large part of the anterior is modified muscle-electric organs to stun prey, possibly navigation and prey detection in murky waters Red List Status: Data deficient Dangerous: harmless Biology: Found on the continental shelf and slope Bathydemersal, marine, depth range 65 – 900 m Endemic to New Zealand Morphology: cm TL One dorsal fin No anal spines Dark brown dorsally, light brown ventrally Almost useless eyes Large part of the anterior is modified muscle-electric organs to stun prey, possibly navigation and prey detection in murky waters Red List Status: Data deficient Dangerous: harmless

5 Temera hardwickii - Finless Sleeper Ray Kelvin K P Lim Greyish-brown with pale edges to the fins max 46 cm TL Disk width ~7.5 cm Demersal marine, found inshore and offshore in continental waters usually on sandy areas and reefs Tropical, Indo-West Pacific- Andaman Sea near Thailand to Burma Importance: aquarium trade, public aquariums Red List Status: Not in IUCN Red List Produces electric shocks when handled.

6 Narke japonica Japanese sleeper ray Basically same 40 cm TL Subtropical, reef-associated, depth 12-23m Northwest Pacific: southern Japan to the South China Sea near Hong Kong. Does not do well in aquariums, minor value as food Basically same 40 cm TL Subtropical, reef-associated, depth 12-23m Northwest Pacific: southern Japan to the South China Sea near Hong Kong. Does not do well in aquariums, minor value as food fishwatcher.la.coocan.jpfishing-forum.org

7 Narke capensis Cape numbfish SFSA Zsilavecz, G. Demersal depth range 20 – 183 m Subtropical - Southeast Atlantic, Cape Point to central Natal, South Africa Possibly occurring in Mozambique and Madagascar The Fish Database of Taiwan Demersal marine Temperate, Western Pacific southern Japan to the South China Sea Demersal marine Temperate, Western Pacific southern Japan to the South China Sea Crassinarke dormitor Sleeper torpedo

8 Heteronarce mollis Soft electric ray 22.5 cm SL Tropical, deep waters Western Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden Hegar 25 cm TL Subtropical, 73 – 329 m Western Indian Ocean: southern Mozambique to Algoa Bay, South Africa Heteronarce garmani Natal electric ray

9 Electrolux addisoni Named after Mark Addison who collected the holotype and the Electrolux vacuum cleaner company. (photographed in 1984, specimen 2003) 20.2 cm TL Dorsal dark brown with small pale yellow spots & concentric black stripes Endemic to East Coast South Africa Named after Mark Addison who collected the holotype and the Electrolux vacuum cleaner company. (photographed in 1984, specimen 2003) 20.2 cm TL Dorsal dark brown with small pale yellow spots & concentric black stripes Endemic to East Coast South Africa Dr Phil Heemstra JC Penny

10 Electrolux addisoni Nostrils-nasal curtain Mouth-Jaws Chondrocranium Skeleton - more vertebrae Prominent spiracular papillae Nostrils-nasal curtain Mouth-Jaws Chondrocranium Skeleton - more vertebrae Prominent spiracular papillae Holotype

11 References: Carrier, J.C., Musick, J.A., Heithaus, M.R., Biology of Sharks and Their Relatives. CRC Press, pp Compagno, LJV & PC Heemstra (2007) Electrolux addisoni, a new genus and species of electric ray from the east coast of South Africa (Rajiformes: Torpedinoidei: Narkidae), with a review of torpedinoid taxonomy. Smithsonian Bulletin 7, 15– Cited by New fish named after vacuum cleaner, Heok Hee Ng: www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (08/2007), accessed 10/1/07. IUCN IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.. Downloaded on 25 October Nelson, J.S., Fishes of the World 4 th edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 73. Hamlett, W. C., Sharks, Skates, and Rays the Biology of Elasmobranch Fishes. The John Hopkins University Press. pp. 33. References: Carrier, J.C., Musick, J.A., Heithaus, M.R., Biology of Sharks and Their Relatives. CRC Press, pp Compagno, LJV & PC Heemstra (2007) Electrolux addisoni, a new genus and species of electric ray from the east coast of South Africa (Rajiformes: Torpedinoidei: Narkidae), with a review of torpedinoid taxonomy. Smithsonian Bulletin 7, 15– Cited by New fish named after vacuum cleaner, Heok Hee Ng: www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (08/2007), accessed 10/1/07. IUCN IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.. Downloaded on 25 October Nelson, J.S., Fishes of the World 4 th edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 73. Hamlett, W. C., Sharks, Skates, and Rays the Biology of Elasmobranch Fishes. The John Hopkins University Press. pp. 33.

12 Any Questions?


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