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Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Welcome.

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Presentation on theme: "Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Welcome."— Presentation transcript:

1 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Welcome

2 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Gabi Stirling Editor, CRP News Overview and introduction to the day; What is an Exclusion Scheme? What is its legal basis – and what are the legal obligations of its members? The benefits to business crime reduction partnerships; Good Practice; the Future Session 1: to Keynote Presentation

3 What is an Exclusion Scheme? Members, Offenders and Exclusions DIY Justice system Punishment Benefits of Exclusion Schemes ‘Localism’ in action

4 Legal basis of Exclusion Common Law Right of Exclusion Equalities Act Role of police Human Rights Act Data Protection Act Best Practice

5 How do Exclusion Schemes work in practice? Rules Functions Administration

6 Partnerships and Exclusion Schemes Exclusion Schemes = ‘clubs’ Involvement with non-Members = Partnerships Police Court system Local government Now more than ever

7 Funding All but the smallest Schemes need money Radio systems Third-party sources Own revenue-stream Continuing role for ‘seed’ funding

8 Localism and Interworking Exclusion Schemes are local What is ‘local’? Non-urban, rural areas? Displacement Importance of inter-working

9 The Future New technology, private security, internet Spending cuts Police and Crime Commissioners New government judicial strategies Restorative Justice

10 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Session 2: to Local crime reduction partnerships in practice Bill Moss Town Centre Manager, Maidstone Real life: practical experience of running a successful exclusion scheme; working with police and other partners; extending the remit; delivering member benefits

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12 Partnerships in Practice Bill Moss Town Centre Manager Maidstone

13 Partnerships in Practice 70,000 Homes 150,000 Residents 2.4% Current unemployment rate 10,000 Target for new jobs by 2026

14 Partnerships in Practice Biggest shopping town in Kent Biggest shopping town spend in Kent Biggest night economy in Kent TCM represents more than 75% of retail floorspace

15 Partnerships in Practice 650 face to face businesses 50% National – 50% Independent 10% Empty units 1,500 people employed in night economy 20,000 clubbers each weekend £65m pa night economy spend 3,500 meals served on a typical Saturday

16 Partnerships in Practice TCM lead the town centre crime reduction partnership Manage and finance Maidstone Shopmobility Manage and finance Urban Blue Active member of the Fair Trade Group Active members of special project groups e.g. Battle of Maidstone Re-enactment; St George’s Day Aim to be first on the list of invitees to join new groups – become invaluable

17 Partnerships in Practice BCRP ‘MaidSafe’ 150 members – 165 radios £90k per annum revenue - £10 per week membership Employs full time Intelligence Manager TCM and PA charge % of salary to MaidSafe All relevant costs charged separately to MaidSafe Separate accounts kept under the umbrella of TCM

18 Partnerships in Practice Managing the Night Economy Many licensed premises ‘condition of license’ to join MaidSafe Safer Socialising Awards Section 27 Notices Exclusion Notice Scheme Saturday night Police briefing TCM Night Economy Forum Purple Flag application

19 Partnerships in Practice Managing the Night Economy Street Pastors Police ‘ownership’ of areas Taxi Marshals – huge struggle to finance - £10k pa Portable urinals Street litter policy after 10pm

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21 Partnerships in Practice Urban Blue Community Bus

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24 Partnerships in Practice Urban Blue Community Bus History – how it happened Costs – approximately £30k pa – eg servicing Volunteers – expenses only Medical supplies – Boots – Prime Minister Lessons learned – awning, location, power First stop for door staff via MaidSafe radios

25 Urban Blue Statistics 397 ambulance call outs saved in the past twelve months Many would have resulted in A & E admissions thus saving the NHS many thousands of pounds Partnerships in Practice

26 Breathalysing clubbers as they arrive in town 46% of those tested over 10mg/ml 20% of those tested over 35mg/ml Most prevalent in age group Mobile phone and water

27 Partnerships in Practice Bottled Water Campaign funded by Baroness Newlove’s Safer Communities Fund 10,000 bottles of Urban Blue Water with three relevant messages on the label

28 Partnerships in Practice

29 Day Time Economy Exclusion notices Sharing of photographs Members meetings Full time Intelligence Manager Never underestimate the power of a cup of tea and a chocolate biscuit

30 Partnerships in Practice Day Time Economy Annual members awards County wide meetings at Police Headquarters Build a strong relationship with local media - (don’t be afraid of them) Host visits from other towns/countries Produce a member’s brochure

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32 Partnerships in Practice Exclusion Notice Scheme Financial challenges Maximising engagement

33 Partnerships in Practice Why is Maidstone successful?

34 Partnerships in Practice Because we talk to each other

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36 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour to Refreshments

37 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Session 3: to Creating a new partnership Tony Mernagh Chief Executive of Brighton & Hove Business Forum The first steps in setting up a new partnership are the most important…

38 Tony Mernagh 5 th July 2012

39 Brighton & Hove BCRP

40 The first thing you need 1. The first thing you need a problem looking for a solution

41 Some places don’t need one

42 2. Interested parties Does something already exist? 6,000 fewer

43 3. What structure? Unincorporated association Simple & cheap Not a separate legal entity Liability of the members Limits to activity Unregulated

44 Form a Company Limited by sharesguarantee £50 & not complicated Liability limited to £1 Legal entity = empowering Regulated by HMRC and Companies House

45 Community Interest Company A business with primarily social objectives Respected Slight additional reporting liability

46 It starts to get serious Equipment Insurance Someone

47 4. What now? Communication Revenue generation Upfront cost

48 Operating a radio net Buying or renting the kit Buying or renting the kit £2k to £200k Holding an Ofcom licence Holding an Ofcom licence £100 to £500 Distribution to members Distribution to members Invoicing and money collection Invoicing and money collection

49 2011/ handsets £160,000 £260,000

50 Growing the scheme 1 staff 2 staff 4 staff members

51 It starts to get even more serious Equipment Insurance Someone

52 Radio net CCTV Control Room

53 Member’s intranet Data integrity agreement

54 Smartphone app

55 Taking it a stage further Incident reports Exclusion Notice scheme

56 Effective? 2 cards = 65 1 card =1000 5,000 p.a.

57 Restorative Justice

58 Getting paid

59 Be organised/ be firm Spreadsheet Accounting package Book-keeper Financial controller Credit control Bad debt £256

60 Brighton outsourcing

61 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Session 4: to Setting up a radio network Roy Smith Metropolitan Police Service A review of latest radio systems; selecting, implementing and administrating a network; financing the system; inter-linking with police

62 Partnerships Against Crime South East Regional Conference 2012 BCRP Radio Networks Roy Smith, Business Crime & Partnerships Manager, New Scotland Yard Date Arial 14pt TOTAL POLICING

63 Disclaimer! "The MPS cannot endorse any single supplier or product. Any reference to suppliers, manufacturers or products in this presentation does not necessarily indicate they are endorsed or approved for use by the MPS" Date Arial 14pt TOTAL POLICING

64 It's really simple! TOTAL POLICING

65 Technical Jargon TOTAL POLICING 5 Tone Selcall Stun / Revive / Kill IP Site Connect FDMA / TDMA 12.5Khz channel spacing PTT ID Lithium Iron / NiMh / NiCAD

66 Objective of this presentation? TOTAL POLICING

67 Isn't radio out of date / old fashioned? TOTAL POLICING

68 Why radio? TOTAL POLICING Instant one-to-many communication Real time intelligence sharing Direct links to police / CCTV Easy to use even with minimal training Visible deterrent Easy to maintain, simple to operate Tried and trusted technology

69 Brand New? TOTAL POLICING Time for an upgrade?

70 First steps? TOTAL POLICING Police / Council / CCTV Support MUST be a partnership Clear business benefits Selling the concept / Demonstrating results Think BUSINESS!!!!!!

71 Is now a good time? TOTAL POLICING

72 Before you choose a supplier? TOTAL POLICING How are you going to fund the system? 1.Existing cash reserves (Purchase) / Bank Loan 2.Hire 3.Long term lease 4.Total managed service

73 TOTAL POLICING Purchase? Most cost effective Long term revenue stream High initial outlay Hire? No cash required upfront Maintenance included Profits to the radio supplier Lease? Lower monthly cost Maintenance included? Maybe! End of term lump sum? Managed Service? Maintenance / Invoicing / Sales included Very little work required Very Expensive

74 Comparethemeerkat.com TOTAL POLICING

75 Things to think about? TOTAL POLICING Reputation? Ask for references (preferably other schemes) Go and see their product in action Trust / relationship Are they "Authorised" dealers (Not re-sellers) Maintenance / Support Geographical location? (IMPORTANT!!!!)

76 Technology? TOTAL POLICING Don’t buy analogue (even if it is really cheap!) Don’t be mis-sold radios with "Selcall" "Digital Signalling" are NOT necessarily digital (E.g. Motorola GP340 / GP344 / Icom ICF3GS)

77 The future is DIGITAL! TOTAL POLICING Not all Digital is the same. This is where it gets a little bit complicated....

78 TDMA vs FDMA Reality is Motorola / HYT / Vertex vs Icom / Kenwood TOTAL POLICING TDMA 2 for the price of 1 Infrastructure cost is less Future proof for expansion Separate Shopwatch / Pubwatch FDMA Channels are "narrow" so in THEORY easier to licence Better analogue / digital migration Higher infrastructure costs (you need 2 of everything)

79 Features? Will you actually use them? TOTAL POLICING Essential? Stun / Revive / Kill Caller ID Emergency button Nice to Have? Text messaging Private calling GPS

80 Infrastructure TOTAL POLICING Where will your base station / repeater (s) be located? Planning permission? Site-survey / coverage (better with digital) Who will "control" your radio channels? Does it work from basements / CCTV rooms? Options? (Mobiles with PSU & Magmount) Multiple base stations (IP Site Connect) Site roaming Connection via IP / Microwave / BT Redcare

81 Command & Control? TOTAL POLICING This might not make me popular! Do NOT buy products sold by single suppliers Consider "open source" software (TRBONet good example) Voice recording / reports (Good to demonstrate value and deal with complaints)

82 Practical pointers? TOTAL POLICING Make sure you give the police / CCTV radios Establish an SLA with the BOCU Commander (use ACPO contacts) Remember its NOT 999 and police / CCTV have lots of radio traffic – focus on DEMAND REDUCTION Don't use call signs! Who is Charlie Tango 22 Foxtrot Bravo Zula 1 Alpha? Effective training – repeat it (Staff churn) Visit regularly (make sure they don't sit on desks!)

83 Conclusion? TOTAL POLICING Go Digital Purchase if possible – but hire / managed service can have its benefits Police support Sell the business benefit (Demand reduction for police and profit protection / staff safety for business)

84 Questions? (Tea, 1 Sugar, Digestives) TOTAL POLICING Roy Smith Mobile:

85 Freedom of Information Act NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKEDPublication Scheme Y/N: Y Title: Partnerships Against Crime Presentation (Radio Networks) 2012 Summary: As Above Branch / OCU: TP Capability & Business Support Date created: 22/10/12Review date: N/A Version: 1.0 Author: Roy Smith (231047) TOTAL POLICING

86 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour to Lunch

87 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Charlie Newman Director, Littoralis Ltd Exclusion Schemes are Admin-intensive. In theory online Administration is more efficient, effective and compliant. But what is the practical, real-life reality? Session 5: to Online vs paper-based administration

88 Paper-based vs online partnerships Online systems are more efficient, effective and compliant. But are they practical? Charlie Newman, Littoralis Limited

89 Online vs Paper Lower cost? More efficient? More accurate? Easier to replicate and ‘publish’? Easier to access? Integrated? More systematic?

90 Why so much Admin? Reporting to many Members Members are customers Data Protection Act.

91 Admin vs The Rest Communicating with Members Attracting new Members Liaising with Partners Building relationships with new Partners New innovative projects Representing the business community.

92 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards Documentation

93 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards Documentation

94 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards Documentation

95 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards Documentation

96 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards Documentation

97 Admin tasks Constitution Data Sharing Agreement Rules of Membership Radio Protocol Incident Report forms Warning cards. Documentation

98 Admin tasks Signing in and signing out Printing and distributing Galleries Collecting Galleries before expiry Processing Incident Reports Mugshot Management

99 Admin tasks Signing in and signing out Printing and distributing Galleries Collecting Galleries before expiry Processing Incident Reports Mugshot Management

100 Admin tasks Signing in and signing out Printing and distributing Galleries Collecting Galleries before expiry Processing Incident Reports Mugshot Management

101 Admin tasks Signing in and signing out Printing and distributing Galleries Collecting Galleries before expiry Processing Incident Reports Mugshot Management

102 Admin tasks Signing in and signing out Printing and distributing Galleries Collecting Galleries before expiry Processing Incident Reports. Mugshot Management

103 Admin tasks Exclusion Monitoring Maintaining and distribution of Exclusion lists Exclusion extensions Exclusion Management

104 Admin tasks Exclusion Monitoring Maintaining and distribution of Exclusion lists Exclusion extensions Exclusion Management

105 Admin tasks Exclusion Monitoring Maintaining and distribution of Exclusion lists Exclusion extensions. Exclusion Management

106 Admin tasks Certification Re-certification Document revisions Membership monitoring. Compliance

107 Admin tasks Key Performance Indicators Reporting to Board of Management Reporting to Members Reporting to ‘stakeholders’. Reporting

108 Admin tasks Reporting to Board and Members Monthly Membership meetings Communication to ALL Members Promoting scheme to new Members Communicating with other Schemes Communications

109 Admin tasks Reporting to Board and Members Monthly Membership meetings Communication to ALL Members Promoting scheme to new Members Communicating with other Schemes. Communications

110 Online solutions

111 Secure website Secure, Members- only website

112 Database Secure, Members- only website Database of Offender and Incident data

113 Weekly eNewsletter Secure, Members- only website Database of Offender and Incident data eCommunications

114 Total integration Secure, Members- only website Database of Offender and Incident data eCommunications …all integrated into one system

115 Documentation All in one place Available 24/7

116 Documentation All in one place Available 24/7 Easily updated Reference Library Immediately downloadable Any digital format

117 Mugshot Management No signing-in or signing-out Automatic expiry Member-coded

118 Incident reporting No signing-in or signing-out Automatic expiry Member-coded Quick, complete ID- linked incident reporting

119 Incident reporting Information Management No signing-in or signing-out Automatic expiry Member-coded Quick, complete ID- linked incident reporting CCTV image uploading CC’ed to Third Parties

120 Incident reporting No signing-in or signing- out Automatic expiry Member-coded Quick, complete ID- linked incident reporting CCTV image uploading CC’ed to Third Parties Integrated with database

121 Offender Management Easily monitor Warnings, Cards & Bans Easily monitor Incident outcomes Automatic deletion of personal data after inactivity Automatic updating of Exclusion Lists

122 Offender Management Easily monitor Warnings, Cards & Bans Easily monitor Incident outcomes Automatic deletion of personal data after inactivity Automatic updating of Exclusion Lists

123 Compliance Self-certification Member ID confirmation

124 Compliance Self-certification Member ID confirmation Compliance with Must- Read Documents Downloadable from intranet No access without completion

125 Compliance Self-certification Member ID confirmation Compliance with Must- Read Documents Downloadable from intranet No access without completion Access monitoring

126 Reporting 100% automated By Offender, Incident, Reporter, benchmark Monthly and 5-years to date Analysis by location, offence type and nature, drink and drugs, weapons…

127 Communications 100% automated Reaches ALL Members Builds Member participation Promotes Scheme’s successes and VFM News, Alerts, Events, Agendas, Minutes

128 Communications 100% automated Reaches ALL Members Builds Member participation Promotes Scheme’s successes and VFM News, Alerts, Events, Agendas, Minutes Options for immediate or urgent communication

129 Admin vs The Rest Less time on Admin means… more time on The Rest Communicating with Members Attracting new Members Liaising with Partners Building relationships with new Partners New innovative projects Representing the business community

130 How much? Implementation of a full system with all functionality: £500 set-up and £50 a month

131 And finally

132 Littoralis

133 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Christine Graham Principal, Christine Graham Consultancy Police & Crime Commissioners, Community Trigger, Restorative Justice and the role of Partnerships Session 6: to The future: partnerships, government and community

134 The Future: Partnerships, Government and Community Christine Graham

135 Police and Crime Commissioners Anti-social Behaviour – new tools and powers Restorative Justice

136 Police and Crime Commissioners

137 41 Police and Crime Commissioners will be elected One for each force (except London) Elections on 15 th November 2012 Elected for a term of four years

138 Different roles of Police and Crime Commissioner Public engagement Setting strategic direction Enabling delivery Ensuring accountability

139 What will they do? Hold Chief Constable account for performance Hire and fire Chief Constable Produce a Police and Crime Plan Make Crime and Disorder Reduction Grants

140 Police and Crime Panels 41 Police and Crime Panels Between members including a minimum of one councillor from each local authority area and two co-opted members Critical friend to PCC, providing as much support as scrutiny

141 What do we know about potential PCCs? Nearly all (81%) have worked at some point in the private sector Nearly two-thirds (64%) have been councillors Majority (78%) believe people will vote for a political party

142 What will their priorities be? 69% - anti-social behaviour 50% - alcohol-related crime and disorder

143 If they were to make one change – what would it be? Neighbourhood policing/community-led solutions Crime prevention and victim support Youth offending

144 How can you be preparing for PCC? Prepare a briefing about your area Send to all the potential candidates Offer to meet with them to brief them Be aware that funding you might have received in the past from CSP may now have moved over to PCC Opportunity to seek funding for initiatives

145 Putting Victims First: More effective responses to anti-social behaviour

146 Aim of the changes Agencies identifying vulnerable and repeat victims earlier and responding at the first sign of trouble A simpler toolkit with powers reduced from 19 to 6 Tough orders to deal with ASB that escalates into criminality The community getting involved in tackling ASB Agencies held to account locally by the Police and Crime Commissioner and victims through the Community Trigger

147 Community Trigger A trigger can be initiated by a third party (eg carer or family member) in the case of vulnerable victims Will be open to use by businesses as well as individuals Currently being piloted in a number of areas

148 New Tools and Powers Criminal Behaviour Order Crime Prevention Injunctions Community Protection Notice Community Protection Order (public places) Community Protection Order (closures) Police powers

149 A more detailed briefing is available at:

150 Restorative Justice

151 What is restorative justice? Brings those who are harmed through crime and those responsible for the harm together Enables communication so that everyone affected by a particular incident can play a part in repairing the harm and finding a positive way forward Gives victims the chance to tell the perpetrators the affect that the crime had on them Gives perpetrators the chance to understand the impact and make amends

152 Best practice Those facilitating the restorative justice should be trained Used by Youth Offending Teams as part of the Referral Order process

153 How much is it used? Recent report by HMIC – Facing Up To Offending: Use of Restorative Justice in the criminal justice system 12% of cases handled by officers in 2011 led to some form of informal resolution – compared with 0.5% in 2008 Rise corresponded with a fall in other out of court settlements such as cautions or on-the-spot fines

154 Views of those involved 85% of victims were happy with the process 75% of victims said it had achieved reparation 91% of offenders said the process was fair 70% said the experience had affected their views on offending 61% said it had not been an easy option

155 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour to Refreshments

156 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Speakers and Delegates ‘Open Mike’ Q&A and discussion session exploring and expanding on issues raised in the conference Session 7: to Plenary Session

157 Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour Further PAC conferences on ‘Exclusion Schemes: reducing high street crime and anti-social behaviour’ North Regional Conference, Leeds, 6 December 2012 Midlands Regional Conference, Birmingham, 28 February 2013 Scotland National Conference, Glasgow, 23 May 2013 Full details at the PAC website: to Networking


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