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Restorative Justice: a viable option for non-academic misconduct? Robyn Jacobson Managing Conflict in Education www.managingconflict.ca.

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Presentation on theme: "Restorative Justice: a viable option for non-academic misconduct? Robyn Jacobson Managing Conflict in Education www.managingconflict.ca."— Presentation transcript:

1 Restorative Justice: a viable option for non-academic misconduct? Robyn Jacobson Managing Conflict in Education

2 NOT GUILTY GUILTY

3 Do you recognize any of these terms from your Code of Conduct? Guilty Not Guilty Conviction at Trial Trial de novo Award costs Stay of decision Frivolous, vexatious or without foundation Motion Disclosure Plaintiff Defendant Opening Statement Closing Statement Oaths Affirmations Summons Notice of Appeal Grounds of Appeal Binding Jurisdiction Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

4 “Nothing is admissible in evidence at a hearing that would be inadmissible in a court by reason of any privilege under the law of evidence or by statute.”

5

6 Reframing Language Found in Traditional Campus Judicial Affairs Programs Existing Language Judicial Affairs Charge Prehearing Evidence Guilty/not guilty Sanctions Appeals Hearing officer Legal counsel Accused Victim Reframed Language Student Conduct Administration, Conduct and Conflict Resolution Process Conduct, referral, conduct question Administrative meeting, conference Sharing of information Responsible/not responsible Restorative or educational measures or community actions Individual and process safeguards Facilitator Advisor/advocate Respondent Complainant, harmed party Nancy Geist Giacomini, “Incorporating Principles of Conflict Resolution and Social Justice into Formal Student Conduct Code Pathways” in Jenniufer Meyer Schrage & Nancy Geist Giacomini, Reframing Campus Conflict: Student Conduct Practice Through a Social Justice Lens at 190.

7 Spectrum of Resolution Options Jennifer Meyer Schrage & Nancy Geist Giacomini, Reframing Campus Conflict: Student Conduct Practice Through a Social Justice Lens (Virginia: Stylus Publications, 2009).

8 What is Restorative Justice? [http://www.novaservices.org/restorative_justice.htm]

9 Retributive Justice Crime is a violation of the state, defined by lawbreaking and guilt. Justice determines blame and administers pain in a contest between the offender and the state directed by systemic rules. Restorative Justice Crime is a violation of people and relationships. It creates obligations to make things right. Justice involves the victim, offender, and the community in a search for solutions which promote repair, reconciliation, and reassurance. Howard Zehr, Changing Lenses: A New Focus for Crime and Justice (Scottsdale, Pa.: Herald Press, 1990) at 181.

10 Retributive Justice Focuses on: The offence committed The offender Questions: [http://www.topnews.in/law/files/jail.jpg]  What offence has been committed?  Who is guilty?  What punishment should be imposed?

11 Restorative Justice Focuses on: The needs of the victim (person harmed) The community (as well as the person who caused the harm) Questions:  What harm has been done?  How can this be remedied? [http://camosun.ca/images/fnes/circle_group.jpg]  Who is responsible for making things right?

12 Restorative Justice can... Build community Align beliefs of the university community with the expected behaviour Give legitimacy to the process of dealing with non-academic misconduct

13 [Restorative Justice] certainly has great potential for being effectively adapted to the unique culture and needs of university members and community. Discussion and outcomes generated by the people directly affected by a student’s conduct can help meet the University’s educational mission, have a greater emotional impact and seem more valid to all involved than outcomes imposed by administrators or as a result of bureaucratic processes. Bill Warters, with Tom Sebok and Andrea Goldblum, “Making Things Right: Restorative Justice Comes to Campuses”

14 Restorative Justice is not appropriate for all offences where student does not take responsibility for the offence victimless crimes where beliefs are not aligned

15 Spectrum of Resolution Options Jennifer Meyer Schrage & Nancy Geist Giacomini, Reframing Campus Conflict: Student Conduct Practice Through a Social Justice Lens (Virginia: Stylus Publications, 2009).

16 David R. Karp, “Introducing Restorative Justice to the Campus Community” in David R. Karp & Thom Allena, Restorative Justice on the College Campus Restorative justice processes help educate community members about the need for civic commitment and build student capacity for evaluating the impact of their behavior on the community. They also legitimate college policies by creating not only due process, but also consensus around behavioural standards and equitable responses to misconduct. Offender accountability is central, but it is balanced with a concern for integration – which is defined by the offender’s ability to regain trust through demonstrated good citizenship.

17 Thank You Robyn Jacobson Managing Conflict in Education


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